Re: [OT] Predicting the unpredictable - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: [OT] Predicting the unpredictable - Linux ; 7 wrote: > Roy Schestowitz wrote: >> [H]omer on Thursday: >> >>> Computer Software to Predict the Unpredictable >>> >>> .---- >>> | Amigan writes "Professor Jerzy Rozenblit at the University >>> | of Arizona was awarded $2.2 Million to ...

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Thread: Re: [OT] Predicting the unpredictable

  1. Re: [OT] Predicting the unpredictable

    7 wrote:
    > Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >> [H]omer on Thursday:
    >>
    >>> Computer Software to Predict the Unpredictable
    >>>
    >>> .----
    >>> | Amigan writes "Professor Jerzy Rozenblit at the University
    >>> | of Arizona was awarded $2.2 Million to develop software to
    >>> | predict the unpredictable

    >
    > I worked out a really clever algorithm which I intend to
    > patent to predict the unpredictable.
    >
    > First make an unpredictable prediction. Then add 2. Put
    > everything into envelopes and put in a box. Now add another
    > envelope containing a predictable unpredictability. Now
    > subtract 2. Now reach into the box and remove the predictable
    > unpredictability envelope. And now you are left inside the box
    > an envelope with your unpredictable prediction!!!!


    I think it would be easier to patent a "hanging chad" algorithm. :-)

    --
    HPT

  2. Re: [OT] Predicting the unpredictable

    High Plains Thumper wrote:

    > 7 wrote:
    >> Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >>> [H]omer on Thursday:
    >>>
    >>>> Computer Software to Predict the Unpredictable
    >>>>
    >>>> .----
    >>>> | Amigan writes "Professor Jerzy Rozenblit at the University
    >>>> | of Arizona was awarded $2.2 Million to develop software to
    >>>> | predict the unpredictable

    >>
    >> I worked out a really clever algorithm which I intend to
    >> patent to predict the unpredictable.
    >>
    >> First make an unpredictable prediction. Then add 2. Put
    >> everything into envelopes and put in a box. Now add another
    >> envelope containing a predictable unpredictability. Now
    >> subtract 2. Now reach into the box and remove the predictable
    >> unpredictability envelope. And now you are left inside the box
    >> an envelope with your unpredictable prediction!!!!

    >
    > I think it would be easier to patent a "hanging chad" algorithm. :-)


    You must have mis-understood something.

    OK Right! I know what it is!!!

    To use this system properly and effectively,
    you must not open the letter until
    your predicted unpredictability has come true.



  3. Re: [OT] Predicting the unpredictable

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, 7

    wrote
    on Thu, 18 Oct 2007 22:07:48 GMT
    :
    > High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >
    >> 7 wrote:
    >>> Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >>>> [H]omer on Thursday:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Computer Software to Predict the Unpredictable
    >>>>>
    >>>>> .----
    >>>>> | Amigan writes "Professor Jerzy Rozenblit at the University
    >>>>> | of Arizona was awarded $2.2 Million to develop software to
    >>>>> | predict the unpredictable
    >>>
    >>> I worked out a really clever algorithm which I intend to
    >>> patent to predict the unpredictable.
    >>>
    >>> First make an unpredictable prediction. Then add 2. Put
    >>> everything into envelopes and put in a box. Now add another
    >>> envelope containing a predictable unpredictability. Now
    >>> subtract 2. Now reach into the box and remove the predictable
    >>> unpredictability envelope. And now you are left inside the box
    >>> an envelope with your unpredictable prediction!!!!

    >>
    >> I think it would be easier to patent a "hanging chad" algorithm. :-)

    >
    > You must have mis-understood something.
    >
    > OK Right! I know what it is!!!
    >
    > To use this system properly and effectively,
    > you must not open the letter until
    > your predicted unpredictability has come true.
    >


    Is there a cat involved in all this, perchance? :-)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net -- insert random radioactive isotope here
    Useless C/C++ Programming Idea #992381111:
    while(bit&BITMASK) ;

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  4. Re: [OT] Predicting the unpredictable

    ____/ The Ghost In The Machine on Friday 19 October 2007 00:23 : \____

    > In comp.os.linux.advocacy, 7
    >
    > wrote
    > on Thu, 18 Oct 2007 22:07:48 GMT
    > :
    >> High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >>
    >>> 7 wrote:
    >>>> Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >>>>> [H]omer on Thursday:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Computer Software to Predict the Unpredictable
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> .----
    >>>>>> | Amigan writes "Professor Jerzy Rozenblit at the University
    >>>>>> | of Arizona was awarded $2.2 Million to develop software to
    >>>>>> | predict the unpredictable
    >>>>
    >>>> I worked out a really clever algorithm which I intend to
    >>>> patent to predict the unpredictable.
    >>>>
    >>>> First make an unpredictable prediction. Then add 2. Put
    >>>> everything into envelopes and put in a box. Now add another
    >>>> envelope containing a predictable unpredictability. Now
    >>>> subtract 2. Now reach into the box and remove the predictable
    >>>> unpredictability envelope. And now you are left inside the box
    >>>> an envelope with your unpredictable prediction!!!!
    >>>
    >>> I think it would be easier to patent a "hanging chad" algorithm. :-)

    >>
    >> You must have mis-understood something.
    >>
    >> OK Right! I know what it is!!!
    >>
    >> To use this system properly and effectively,
    >> you must not open the letter until
    >> your predicted unpredictability has come true.
    >>

    >
    > Is there a cat involved in all this, perchance? :-)


    $ diff prediction reality | cat

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    Microsoft loves competition.
    "Linux is a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to
    everything it touches."
    --Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO

  5. Re: [OT] Predicting the unpredictable

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Roy Schestowitz

    wrote
    on Fri, 19 Oct 2007 05:00:57 +0100
    <1556700.ZjQO1ZjhyB@schestowitz.com>:
    > ____/ The Ghost In The Machine on Friday 19 October 2007 00:23 : \____
    >
    >> In comp.os.linux.advocacy, 7
    >>
    >> wrote
    >> on Thu, 18 Oct 2007 22:07:48 GMT
    >> :
    >>> High Plains Thumper wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 7 wrote:
    >>>>> Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    >>>>>> [H]omer on Thursday:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Computer Software to Predict the Unpredictable
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> .----
    >>>>>>> | Amigan writes "Professor Jerzy Rozenblit at the University
    >>>>>>> | of Arizona was awarded $2.2 Million to develop software to
    >>>>>>> | predict the unpredictable
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I worked out a really clever algorithm which I intend to
    >>>>> patent to predict the unpredictable.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> First make an unpredictable prediction. Then add 2. Put
    >>>>> everything into envelopes and put in a box. Now add another
    >>>>> envelope containing a predictable unpredictability. Now
    >>>>> subtract 2. Now reach into the box and remove the predictable
    >>>>> unpredictability envelope. And now you are left inside the box
    >>>>> an envelope with your unpredictable prediction!!!!
    >>>>
    >>>> I think it would be easier to patent a "hanging chad" algorithm. :-)
    >>>
    >>> You must have mis-understood something.
    >>>
    >>> OK Right! I know what it is!!!
    >>>
    >>> To use this system properly and effectively,
    >>> you must not open the letter until
    >>> your predicted unpredictability has come true.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Is there a cat involved in all this, perchance? :-)

    >
    > $ diff prediction reality | cat
    >


    I was thinking more along the lines of Schroedinger's
    famous animal, but that also works. :-)

    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    Useless C/C++ Programming Idea #1123133:
    void f(FILE * fptr, char *p) { fgets(p, sizeof(p), fptr); }

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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