AutoMount - Linux

This is a discussion on AutoMount - Linux ; Hello All, I installed vector-linux, in my old Laptop (Toshiba 2520CDT). Everything works fine after quite a bit of research on Internet. I am having problems in automount. I would like my system automount my windows drives. I googled and ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: AutoMount

  1. AutoMount

    Hello All,
    I installed vector-linux, in my old Laptop (Toshiba 2520CDT).
    Everything works fine after quite a bit of research on Internet. I am
    having problems in automount. I would like my system automount my
    windows drives. I googled and found out that autofs is the solution.
    "ps -ef" doesnt give any process named autofs in my system. I tried to
    look for auto.master in /etc/ dir. I couldnt find that too. So I
    persume, the kernal I have, doesnt support starting autofs.. am I
    correct ? .. is there any way I can confirm it ? Is there any round
    about way to do it ? My second question is as follows.
    After being unsuccessful in mounting through autofs, I tried to
    manually mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/windows/win_c
    /dev/hda5 /mnt/windows/win_d
    /dev/hda6 /mnt/windows/win_f

    It works perfectly when I am root. But, when I login as any other user
    I dont have rigts to access the files. chmod -R 755 /mnt/windows/win_d
    is a very time consuming process, and it fails to store the information
    once I rebbot. Is there some way I can have r+w permissions on the
    drives I have mounted as root ?

    Thanks in advance for any help.
    Ik.


  2. Re: AutoMount

    Spake ik:
    > Everything works fine after quite a bit of research on Internet. I am
    > having problems in automount. I would like my system automount my
    > windows drives. I googled and found out that autofs is the solution.


    Automount is for removable drives (e.g. USB keys).

    > /dev/hda5 /mnt/windows/win_d
    > /dev/hda6 /mnt/windows/win_f


    These are permanently connected (I assume). Therefore you can simply
    (as root) add to your /etc/fstab file:

    /dev/hda5 /mnt/windows/win_d vfat rw,user,auto,exec 0 0

    The "user" option allows non-root users to access the filesystem.

    The "auto" option causes the filesystem to be mounted automatically at
    boot time.

    The "vfat" option specifies a FAT filesystem. If you have NTFS instead,
    use "ntfs" in its place. Be careful, writing to NTFS filesystems is not
    supported / stable under most Linux distributions.

    --
    Trent Buck, Student Errant
    Indeed do many things come to pass.

+ Reply to Thread