Partitioning in Linux - Linux

This is a discussion on Partitioning in Linux - Linux ; I wanted to see how to partition in Linux prior to an installation. I started with Ubuntu and created the following: This is a 6GB drive / 4GB /home 1.4 GB /swap 600 MB My question is this....do you still ...

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Thread: Partitioning in Linux

  1. Partitioning in Linux

    I wanted to see how to partition in Linux prior to an installation. I
    started with Ubuntu and created the following:

    This is a 6GB drive


    / 4GB

    /home 1.4 GB

    /swap 600 MB


    My question is this....do you still have to manually allocate and create a
    /SWAP partition?


    Thanks.



  2. Re: Partitioning in Linux

    "KT" writes:

    >I wanted to see how to partition in Linux prior to an installation. I
    >started with Ubuntu and created the following:


    >This is a 6GB drive



    >/ 4GB


    >/home 1.4 GB


    >/swap 600 MB



    >My question is this....do you still have to manually allocate and create a
    >/SWAP partition?


    What are you asking? You have a swap partition (or ratehr I assume so. It
    is NOT /swap. A swap partition is not part of the filesystem)



  3. Re: Partitioning in Linux

    Okay, thanks...that's what I was looking for - the fact that I do NOT have
    to create /SWAP. In the partitioning tool I had 600+MB left but no option
    for plain swap space - the only thing it listed were /var, /home, /usr,
    /home but NOT plain SWAP - that's why I created /swap myself - it at least
    had an option for your own partition label - so I labeled /swap thinking
    swap uses its own partition and that the system would recognize it anyhow.




    wrote in message
    news:d1lt5v$dol$1@nntp.itservices.ubc.ca...
    > "KT" writes:
    >
    >>I wanted to see how to partition in Linux prior to an installation. I
    >>started with Ubuntu and created the following:

    >
    >>This is a 6GB drive

    >
    >
    >>/ 4GB

    >
    >>/home 1.4 GB

    >
    >>/swap 600 MB

    >
    >
    >>My question is this....do you still have to manually allocate and create a
    >>/SWAP partition?

    >
    > What are you asking? You have a swap partition (or ratehr I assume so. It
    > is NOT /swap. A swap partition is not part of the filesystem)
    >
    >




  4. Re: Partitioning in Linux

    KT wrote:
    > Okay, thanks...that's what I was looking for - the
    > fact that I do NOT have to create /SWAP. In the
    > partitioning tool I had 600+MB left but no option
    > for plain swap space - the only thing it listed
    > were /var, /home, /usr, /home but NOT plain SWAP -
    > that's why I created /swap myself - it at least
    > had an option for your own partition label - so I
    > labeled /swap thinking swap uses its own partition
    > and that the system would recognize it anyhow.
    >

    What distro and what partitioning tool? You still need a
    swap partition. It is just not called /swap. Your
    partitioning tool should have given you the option of
    creating a swap partition. The system won't run at all well
    without a swap partition.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    Barzoomian the Martian - http://barzoomian.blogspot.com

  5. Re: Partitioning in Linux

    Spake KT:
    > Okay, thanks...that's what I was looking for - the fact that I do NOT have
    > to create /SWAP. In the partitioning tool I had 600+MB left but no option
    > for plain swap space - the only thing it listed were /var, /home, /usr,
    > /home but NOT plain SWAP - that's why I created /swap myself - it at least
    > had an option for your own partition label - so I labeled /swap thinking
    > swap uses its own partition and that the system would recognize it anyhow.


    A swap partition is not a /swap partition.

    If you ask for a /swap partition, the installer will create an ordinary
    filesystem and mount it at /swap. This is not correct.

    A swap partition is like a swapfile under Windows, or virtual memory
    under MacOS. It does not contain files. It is not mounted anywhere on
    the filesystem. A swap partition is an extension to MEMORY, not the
    filesystem. You don't mount your main memory (RAM) anywhere, either.

    The last Ubuntu install I did automatically (IIRC) created a swap
    partition with a size equal to half the main memory (in that case,
    500Mb).

    --
    Trent Buck, Student Errant
    We're the technical experts. We were hired so that management could
    ignore our recommendations and tell us how to do our jobs.
    -- Mike Andrews

  6. Re: Partitioning in Linux

    Yes, the Ubuntu automatic partition portion does create a standard swap
    space. What I was tryiong to do is create a separate /home partition using
    the MANUAL process via Ubuntu tool (during setup). It allowed me to to
    create the / and the /home but I did not see an option with what do to do
    next with the remaining space - such as create swap space - so I created
    /swap (which I now know is incorrect) - I just did not see anything else
    peratining to swap space during this manual mode.



    "Trent Buck" wrote in message
    news:20050321205333.31aa6b4e@harpo.marx...
    > Spake KT:
    >> Okay, thanks...that's what I was looking for - the fact that I do NOT
    >> have
    >> to create /SWAP. In the partitioning tool I had 600+MB left but no
    >> option
    >> for plain swap space - the only thing it listed were /var, /home, /usr,
    >> /home but NOT plain SWAP - that's why I created /swap myself - it at
    >> least
    >> had an option for your own partition label - so I labeled /swap thinking
    >> swap uses its own partition and that the system would recognize it
    >> anyhow.

    >
    > A swap partition is not a /swap partition.
    >
    > If you ask for a /swap partition, the installer will create an ordinary
    > filesystem and mount it at /swap. This is not correct.
    >
    > A swap partition is like a swapfile under Windows, or virtual memory
    > under MacOS. It does not contain files. It is not mounted anywhere on
    > the filesystem. A swap partition is an extension to MEMORY, not the
    > filesystem. You don't mount your main memory (RAM) anywhere, either.
    >
    > The last Ubuntu install I did automatically (IIRC) created a swap
    > partition with a size equal to half the main memory (in that case,
    > 500Mb).
    >
    > --
    > Trent Buck, Student Errant
    > We're the technical experts. We were hired so that management could
    > ignore our recommendations and tell us how to do our jobs.
    > -- Mike Andrews




  7. Re: Partitioning in Linux

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 06:35:07 GMT, "KT" wrote:

    >I wanted to see how to partition in Linux prior to an installation. I
    >started with Ubuntu and created the following:
    >
    >This is a 6GB drive
    >
    >
    >/ 4GB
    >
    >/home 1.4 GB
    >
    >/swap 600 MB
    >
    >
    >My question is this....do you still have to manually allocate and create a
    >/SWAP partition?
    >
    >
    >Thanks.
    >

    This will not work. It will just create an ext2/ext3/etc.. partition
    and mount it under /swap. The OS swap partition is a completely
    different type of filesystem that can not be mounted and used as
    normal storage. The SWAP partition is never mounted under the root
    filesystem and should not be called /swap. It is merely a chunk of
    disk of type 82 which tells the OS that it can be used for virtual
    memory. So the answer to your question is YES, you do need to create
    a partition and set it to type 82 to have a SWAP partition.

  8. Re: Partitioning in Linux

    Ian East wrote:
    > On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 06:35:07 GMT, "KT" wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I wanted to see how to partition in Linux prior to an installation. I
    >>started with Ubuntu and created the following:
    >>
    >>This is a 6GB drive
    >>
    >>
    >>/ 4GB
    >>
    >>/home 1.4 GB
    >>
    >>/swap 600 MB
    >>
    >>
    >>My question is this....do you still have to manually allocate and create a
    >>/SWAP partition?
    >>
    >>
    >>Thanks.
    >>

    >
    > This will not work. It will just create an ext2/ext3/etc.. partition
    > and mount it under /swap. The OS swap partition is a completely
    > different type of filesystem that can not be mounted and used as
    > normal storage. The SWAP partition is never mounted under the root
    > filesystem and should not be called /swap. It is merely a chunk of
    > disk of type 82 which tells the OS that it can be used for virtual
    > memory. So the answer to your question is YES, you do need to create
    > a partition and set it to type 82 to have a SWAP partition.


    6 GB is really small these days. I would pre-partition the drive like this:

    Using cfdisk, which is on the Ubuntu installation disk-
    4 GB (active, bootable) type 83
    1.5 GB type 83
    512 GB type 82

    The installer is going to reformat them anyway, and turn them into ext3.
    Things are just simpler when you have everything sized ahead of time.
    With a drive that small, you'll have to go with a minimal installation
    anyway, so plan out your partitions.

    I am writing this on a Dell Inspiron 4000 with a 20 GB drive, split in
    half. 9.5 GB win2k, 384 MB restore, 9.5 GB Mandrake-10.1, 384 MB swap.
    On my real computer, I have 111 GB of space and no windows at all, so I
    can play.

    Broken down for a 40 GB drive:
    / = 2 GB
    /boot = 128 MB
    /usr = 18 GB
    /home = 9 GB
    /var = 9 GB
    swap = 512 MB

    There was a long thread about a year ago on alt.os.linux.mandrake about
    how to properly proportion partition schemes. Remember that /usr
    contains all of your system binaries and that /var may or may not need
    to grow large (depending on mail, ftp and html usage). On a notebook,
    you can get away with a single / partition and a swap space, but this is
    a bad idea on a desktop.

    Go to Google Groups and search for partition schemes and see what you
    can find. When searching the groups don't try to be too exact and keep
    your queries short.

    HTH

    Michael

    --
    RLU #352695
    35.14N - 101.50W

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