Basic newbie questions - Linux

This is a discussion on Basic newbie questions - Linux ; 1. Where is the FAQ for this group? 2. If not answered in the FAQ, please tell me: (a) Will Linux run on Dell, IBM and/or Compaq computers or do I need special machines made by Sun Microsystems or other ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Basic newbie questions

  1. Basic newbie questions

    1. Where is the FAQ for this group?
    2. If not answered in the FAQ, please tell me:
    (a) Will Linux run on Dell, IBM and/or Compaq computers or do
    I need special machines made by Sun Microsystems or other providers?
    (b) Am I right in thinking that Star Office is more or less
    the Linux equivalent of Windows Office? With spreadsheet, database, word
    processor, calculator and calendaring/contact management functions?
    (c) If I go to a Linux system using Star Office, will any
    commercially available brand of Linux (Mandrake, Red Hat, etc.) permit me to
    run Star Office?
    (d) Where can I find a web-site, magazine or other source of
    information that will fill me in on a basic level on what I need to convert
    my small office (three networked computers) from Windows to Linux?

    Please don't bother answering any of the above questions if they are already
    answered in the FAQ. Thanks in advance for your help.



    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----

  2. Re: Basic newbie questions

    pinstripe wrote:

    > (a) Will Linux run on Dell, IBM and/or Compaq computers or do I need
    > special machines made by Sun Microsystems or other providers?


    Yes, will run on Dell and the like, but depends on what hardware you have.
    No, you do not need a Sun.

    > (b) Am I right in thinking that Star Office is more or less the Linux
    > equivalent of Windows Office? With spreadsheet, database, word processor,
    > calculator and calendaring/contact management functions?


    You can use OpenOffice for spreadsheet, word processor and presentation.
    Database stuff is in the works for version 2. For calculator and
    calendaring and contact management there are a million possibilities. Some
    of them come with the GUI you use, some are web based.

    > (c) If I go to a Linux system using Star Office, will any commercially
    > available brand of Linux (Mandrake, Red Hat, etc.) permit me to run Star
    > Office?


    Some if not most of them include OpenOffice in their distribution. The
    commercial aspect of Mandrake and the like is that they charge you for
    creating the distribution and some paper manuals. There are distributions
    such as SuSE that are also freely available, but then you do not have paper
    manuals.

    > (d) Where can I find a web-site, magazine or other source of information
    > that will fill me in on a basic level on what I need to convert my small
    > office (three networked computers) from Windows to Linux?


    Google is your friend. First make a list of things you really need, then
    find a distro you like. Begin with experimenting with it before converting
    your office, or ask somebody that can help you with that.

    --
    Ruurd
    ..o.
    ...o
    ooo

  3. Re: Basic newbie questions


    "pinstripe" wrote in message
    news:420919e2$1_2@127.0.0.1...
    > 1. Where is the FAQ for this group?
    > 2. If not answered in the FAQ, please tell me:
    > (a) Will Linux run on Dell, IBM and/or Compaq computers or
    > do
    > I need special machines made by Sun Microsystems or other providers?

    you need nothing. linux was developed for dell, ibm compaq x86. and
    later ported to others like suns

    > (b) Am I right in thinking that Star Office is more or
    > less
    > the Linux equivalent of Windows Office? With spreadsheet, database, word
    > processor, calculator and calendaring/contact management functions?
    > (c) If I go to a Linux system using Star Office, will any
    > commercially available brand of Linux (Mandrake, Red Hat, etc.) permit me
    > to
    > run Star Office?
    > (d) Where can I find a web-site, magazine or other source
    > of
    > information that will fill me in on a basic level on what I need to
    > convert
    > my small office (three networked computers) from Windows to Linux?
    >

    way i heard is that, ms office do the jobs. but windows is suck at
    defending itself from the web even when you do notthing at all meaning
    without any user accidents, you'll have headache one way or another. even
    with automatic update from ms and you followed the rules from ms strictly
    and well. plp lose alot of tiem and moeny from it. that's where linux is
    strong. when windows was shaken by net, linux was stable. even with virus
    and warms. so you might want to thinking of mix up the two well, if you
    want to avoid feature headaches from it.

    hope it helps...

    > Please don't bother answering any of the above questions if they are
    > already
    > answered in the FAQ. Thanks in advance for your help.
    >
    >
    >
    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
    > News==----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+
    > Newsgroups
    > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption
    > =----




  4. Re: Basic newbie questions

    The above answers were very helpful and I thank R. F. Pels and News for
    them.

    Just one comment to News regarding the vulnerability of Windows to virus,
    worms, etc., I was able with the use of a good anti-virus program up-dated
    twice daily (because you never know just when the day's virus definitions
    will be released) to keep the system free of infection, deleting unopened
    every unexpected attachment even from people I knew and scanning every
    attachment for virus before opening it, no matter who it came from.
    However, I DID find that Windows crashed on a fairly regular basis for no
    apparent reason, often at the most inconvenient times. One of the major
    reasons that I am thinking of Linux is the stability of the Linux system
    compared to Windows.

    Once again, thanks to both of you for your assistance.

    "News" wrote in message
    news:QT9Od.5265$oO.2960@newsread2.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
    >
    > "pinstripe" wrote in message
    > news:420919e2$1_2@127.0.0.1...
    > > 1. Where is the FAQ for this group?
    > > 2. If not answered in the FAQ, please tell me:
    > > (a) Will Linux run on Dell, IBM and/or Compaq computers or
    > > do
    > > I need special machines made by Sun Microsystems or other providers?

    > you need nothing. linux was developed for dell, ibm compaq x86. and
    > later ported to others like suns
    >
    > > (b) Am I right in thinking that Star Office is more or
    > > less
    > > the Linux equivalent of Windows Office? With spreadsheet, database,

    word
    > > processor, calculator and calendaring/contact management functions?
    > > (c) If I go to a Linux system using Star Office, will any
    > > commercially available brand of Linux (Mandrake, Red Hat, etc.) permit

    me
    > > to
    > > run Star Office?
    > > (d) Where can I find a web-site, magazine or other source
    > > of
    > > information that will fill me in on a basic level on what I need to
    > > convert
    > > my small office (three networked computers) from Windows to Linux?
    > >

    > way i heard is that, ms office do the jobs. but windows is suck at
    > defending itself from the web even when you do notthing at all meaning
    > without any user accidents, you'll have headache one way or another. even
    > with automatic update from ms and you followed the rules from ms strictly
    > and well. plp lose alot of tiem and moeny from it. that's where linux is
    > strong. when windows was shaken by net, linux was stable. even with

    virus
    > and warms. so you might want to thinking of mix up the two well, if you
    > want to avoid feature headaches from it.
    >
    > hope it helps...
    >
    > > Please don't bother answering any of the above questions if they are
    > > already
    > > answered in the FAQ. Thanks in advance for your help.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
    > > News==----
    > > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+
    > > Newsgroups
    > > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption
    > > =----

    >
    >




    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----

  5. Re: Basic newbie questions

    M. Gould wrote:
    > The above answers were very helpful and I thank R. F. Pels and News for
    > them.
    >
    > Just one comment to News regarding the vulnerability of Windows to virus,
    > worms, etc., I was able with the use of a good anti-virus program up-dated
    > twice daily (because you never know just when the day's virus definitions
    > will be released) to keep the system free of infection, deleting unopened
    > every unexpected attachment even from people I knew and scanning every
    > attachment for virus before opening it, no matter who it came from.
    > However, I DID find that Windows crashed on a fairly regular basis for no
    > apparent reason, often at the most inconvenient times. One of the major
    > reasons that I am thinking of Linux is the stability of the Linux system
    > compared to Windows.
    >
    >


    And my comment: I just recently installed FC3 dual-boot with the XP
    system I've been running for 3 years. I never had a problem with XP
    crashing. Now I've been hearing for a long time about how stable Linux
    is, too. In the three weeks or so that I've been running Linux, I've had
    Gnome crash on me twice. Just "bloop" and I'm looking at the login
    screen. True enough, the kernel didn't crash, but that's scant comfort
    if all your apps just disappear. Very little practical difference.

    In my experience, if you are getting frequent crashes -- regardless of
    the OS -- you should investigate the possibility that you have flaky
    RAM. That will bite you in the butt real good. Just "wham" for no
    apparent reason.

    Just my $0.02 worth.

    Rod

  6. Re: Basic newbie questions



    > is, too. In the three weeks or so that I've been running Linux, I've had
    > Gnome crash on me twice. Just "bloop" and I'm looking at the login


    that's cuz you're running developer's version. all new versions
    of softwares are stilling being developed, even the recent stables(this
    is way i see definition of developing software). i recommend you to stay
    behind a little. fc is still being developed as well. simply it's not
    product complete yet to my view. only redhat and companies sell it as
    product with lower cost. i personally still use kernel v 2.2. most of
    new features of linux kernel are still experimental literally. and they
    dont' finish up the project that well in my observation. heard them
    talking kernel source tree is getting trashy and someone needs to clean it
    up nicely. and i noticed programmers experiment lotta things in kernel
    and leaves it as it is. you might want to stop getting excited from new
    features if you want to get jobs done, and unless the new feature's rock
    solid.

    if you never got win xp crashed i dont' believe you, unless you dont' use
    internet with it. After my fresh installation, i accidently misspelled
    web address google in explorer, and visited unknow site. from that moment
    explore just redirect page to that, and went out of control. I just
    reinstalled it and updated. and after five six month surfing the
    internet, win xp's getting trashy again, acting weired time to time,
    starting to troubles me a little, and in win xp home ntbackup doesn't work
    dammit. i'm about to lose all data again unless i pay them another fee
    for gettin backup software! ( paying $$ for nothing ! )

  7. Re: Basic newbie questions

    besides what os do you think makes servers desktops even laptops running
    356 24/7 stable? well I'll say BSD, but linux is alternative to it and to
    windows. you'll see not many use windows for server or even stability.
    if your linux system crashes, it's simple. either hardware bios, hardware
    incompatiability, non-ecc, screwed up linux configuration, and lastly
    software bug the betas. a lot of linux new features don't advance above
    beta lol. except one you really need it. if you eliminate all of these
    trouble points, your system will run virtually stable, worry free, no
    virus, no worms 24/7. and windows is not.

    ... yeah people recommend to use BSD for safe cuz of nature of linux
    development. but i find a little left behind, patched linux is stable
    enuf for desktop router with personallized shell script running 24/7

  8. Re: Basic newbie questions

    * Rod Engelsman wrote in comp.os.linux:
    > M. Gould wrote:



    > And my comment: I just recently installed FC3 dual-boot with the XP
    > system I've been running for 3 years. I never had a problem with XP
    > crashing. Now I've been hearing for a long time about how stable Linux
    > is, too. In the three weeks or so that I've been running Linux, I've had
    > Gnome crash on me twice.


    So? there are ENDLESS numbers of gui's you can use, switch if Gnome is
    giving you issues.
    --
    David
    Just give Alice some pencils and she will stay busy for hours.

  9. Re: Basic newbie questions

    pinstripe wrote:

    > 2. If not answered in the FAQ, please tell me:
    > (a) Will Linux run on Dell, IBM and/or Compaq computers or
    > do
    > I need special machines made by Sun Microsystems or other providers?


    Linux will run on pretty much anything - we use a combination of Dell, IBM,
    Toshiba and other computers, all running Linux without problems. You may
    find issues with some hardware - "winmodems" for example, aren't well
    supported, and some printers have only Windows drivers available (blame the
    manufacturers!). However, in most instances, you won't have hardware
    compatability issues.

    > (b) Am I right in thinking that Star Office is more or
    > less
    > the Linux equivalent of Windows Office? With spreadsheet, database, word
    > processor, calculator and calendaring/contact management functions?


    Star Office is now a closed source version - most folks use Open Office,
    which is based on Star Office, but is open source. All the functions of MS
    Office are available, but with better stability. You can also import and
    export your files in MS file formats (like Word .doc) if you want to,
    though Open Office has its own (more efficient) file formats.

    > (c) If I go to a Linux system using Star Office, will any
    > commercially available brand of Linux (Mandrake, Red Hat, etc.) permit me
    > to run Star Office?


    All the big distributions supply Open Office as part of the disk pack.

    > (d) Where can I find a web-site, magazine or other source
    > of
    > information that will fill me in on a basic level on what I need to
    > convert my small office (three networked computers) from Windows to Linux?


    Perhaps Google would be a good place to start. It will also be worth
    visiting the Suse and Mandrakesoft web sites.

    Chris

    --
    Everything gets easier with practice, except getting up in the morning!

  10. Re: Basic newbie questions

    SINNER wrote:
    > * Rod Engelsman wrote in comp.os.linux:
    >
    >>M. Gould wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    >>And my comment: I just recently installed FC3 dual-boot with the XP
    >>system I've been running for 3 years. I never had a problem with XP
    >>crashing. Now I've been hearing for a long time about how stable Linux
    >>is, too. In the three weeks or so that I've been running Linux, I've had
    >>Gnome crash on me twice.

    >
    >
    > So? there are ENDLESS numbers of gui's you can use, switch if Gnome is
    > giving you issues.


    Yeah, KDE seems more stable. And it has a look that is more comfortable
    for a Windows refugee.

    My point is just that you are all the time hearing about how stable a
    linux box is. "Why, I haven't rebooted my machine since the Carter
    administration!" Or how parsimonious with resources it is compared to
    Windows. But the comparison never seems to be apples to apples. It's
    always about a bare CLI running a server install. Why else would you run
    24/7? I don't like writing checks to the electric company *that* much.
    When I sleep so does my computer.

    The only valid comparison is gui to gui, running equivalent apps. So far
    my experience with linux has been mixed. I've been surprised by how well
    some things work and disappointed in other areas. In general, I find
    that it takes me longer to do things with linux and the apps for linux
    than it does in Windows, but I'm still on the steep slope of the
    learning curve. Occasionally, if I have something I need to do *now*, I
    have to just give up and reboot into XP. But so far, I would be
    hard-pressed to say that Linux is functionally *better* in any areas.
    Absent a political motivation -- or a particular technical need related
    to servers or such -- it's hard to see why one would switch from an
    already paid-for, legal copy of XP to run Linux.

    Ask me again in a few months.

    Rod

  11. Re: Basic newbie questions

    pinstripe wrote:
    > 1. Where is the FAQ for this group?
    > 2. If not answered in the FAQ, please tell me:
    > (a) Will Linux run on Dell, IBM and/or Compaq computers or do
    > I need special machines made by Sun Microsystems or other providers?
    > (b) Am I right in thinking that Star Office is more or less
    > the Linux equivalent of Windows Office? With spreadsheet, database, word
    > processor, calculator and calendaring/contact management functions?
    > (c) If I go to a Linux system using Star Office, will any
    > commercially available brand of Linux (Mandrake, Red Hat, etc.) permit me to
    > run Star Office?
    > (d) Where can I find a web-site, magazine or other source of
    > information that will fill me in on a basic level on what I need to convert
    > my small office (three networked computers) from Windows to Linux?
    >
    > Please don't bother answering any of the above questions if they are already
    > answered in the FAQ. Thanks in advance for your help.
    >
    >
    >
    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----I I have no idea where the FAQ for this group is,

    However I have had success running Debian (ubuntu) Fedora, Suse,
    Mandrake on Dells and Panasonics a good way to test is to use the
    Knoppix distro which runs entirely from the disk in order to test your
    hardware without discovering what does not work as advertised following
    a live install. You should not require a special machine.
    Open office which comes with most distros is the functional equivalent
    of microsoft office with the exception of the database feature, for that
    you would need star office.
    All distros that I have used are binarily capable of running star office

    www.linuxjournal.com
    www.linux.org
    www.sourceforge.net
    this news group and others like it.

    I would reccomend purchasing one of more of the following titles,
    Running Linux
    Linux in a Nutshell
    Wicked Cool Shell Scripts
    MultiTool Linux
    Learning Linux

    There are others, I just can't see them all from my desk.


+ Reply to Thread