How to address LARGE (12GB) amounts of RAM? - Linux

This is a discussion on How to address LARGE (12GB) amounts of RAM? - Linux ; Hi there, I just became the proud owner of a Sun V65x which I want to serve up Oracle 10g. Here is some info about it: I'm running RedHat ES 2.1 (I think, maybe it is AS 2.1): [root@moi /tmp]# ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: How to address LARGE (12GB) amounts of RAM?

  1. How to address LARGE (12GB) amounts of RAM?

    Hi there,

    I just became the proud owner of a Sun V65x which I want to serve up Oracle 10g.

    Here is some info about it:

    I'm running RedHat ES 2.1 (I think, maybe it is AS 2.1):

    [root@moi /tmp]# uname -a
    uname -a
    Linux sgrid-db2 2.4.9-e.24smp #1 SMP Tue May 27 16:07:39 EDT 2003 i686 unknown
    [root@moi /tmp]#


    It has 4x 3.06GHz Xeon CPU:

    [root@moi tmp]# dmesg
    e: 512K
    CPU: Physical Processor ID: 0
    Intel machine check reporting enabled on CPU#1.
    CPU: After vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU: After generic, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU: Common caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU1: Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU 3.06GHz stepping 09
    Booting processor 2/6 eip 2000
    Initializing CPU#2
    masked ExtINT on CPU#2
    ESR value before enabling vector: 00000000
    ESR value after enabling vector: 00000000
    Calibrating delay loop... 6107.95 BogoMIPS
    CPU: Before vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000, vendor = 0
    CPU: L1 I cache: 12K, L1 D cache: 8K
    CPU: L2 cache: 512K
    CPU: Physical Processor ID: 3
    Intel machine check reporting enabled on CPU#2.
    CPU: After vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU: After generic, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU: Common caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU2: Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU 3.06GHz stepping 09
    Booting processor 3/7 eip 2000
    Initializing CPU#3
    masked ExtINT on CPU#3
    ESR value before enabling vector: 00000000
    ESR value after enabling vector: 00000000
    Calibrating delay loop... 6107.95 BogoMIPS
    CPU: Before vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000, vendor = 0
    CPU: L1 I cache: 12K, L1 D cache: 8K
    CPU: L2 cache: 512K
    CPU: Physical Processor ID: 3
    Intel machine check reporting enabled on CPU#3.
    CPU: After vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU: After generic, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU: Common caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU3: Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU 3.06GHz stepping 09
    Total of 4 processors activated (24418.71 BogoMIPS).


    It has 6 x 2GB dimms in it for a total of 12GB of RAM.

    On the surface this looks like a nice little package.

    The problem is...
    I think that my Linux kernel is configured such that it can only
    address some of it.

    For example, when I run 'top', I see this:

    [root@moi tmp]# top
    (null) 12:52pm up 6 days, 20:21, 1 user, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.00
    60 processes: 59 sleeping, 1 running, 0 zombie, 0 stopped
    CPU0 states: 0.0% user, 0.0% system, 0.0% nice, 100.0% idle
    CPU1 states: 0.0% user, 0.0% system, 0.0% nice, 100.0% idle
    CPU2 states: 0.0% user, 0.0% system, 0.0% nice, 100.0% idle
    CPU3 states: 0.0% user, 0.0% system, 0.0% nice, 100.0% idle
    Mem: 1027716K av, 333864K used, 693852K free, 192K shrd, 93952K buff
    Swap: 2096472K av, 0K used, 2096472K free 149732K cached

    It appears that I only have 1027716K of RAM which can be seen by Linux.

    How do I confirm this?

    A related and more important question,
    "How do I configure my 32 bit Linux so it can see 12GB of RAM?"

    It must be possible if the V65x allows me to put 12GB RAM in the chasis.

    -moi

  2. Re: How to address LARGE (12GB) amounts of RAM?

    Equis Uno wrote:
    > Hi there,
    >
    > I just became the proud owner of a Sun V65x which I want to serve up Oracle 10g.
    >
    > Here is some info about it:
    >
    > I'm running RedHat ES 2.1 (I think, maybe it is AS 2.1):
    >
    > [root@moi /tmp]# uname -a
    > uname -a
    > Linux sgrid-db2 2.4.9-e.24smp #1 SMP Tue May 27 16:07:39 EDT 2003 i686 unknown
    > [root@moi /tmp]#
    >
    >
    > It has 4x 3.06GHz Xeon CPU:
    >
    > [root@moi tmp]# dmesg
    > e: 512K
    > CPU: Physical Processor ID: 0
    > Intel machine check reporting enabled on CPU#1.
    > CPU: After vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    > CPU: After generic, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    > CPU: Common caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    > CPU1: Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU 3.06GHz stepping 09
    > Booting processor 2/6 eip 2000
    > Initializing CPU#2
    > masked ExtINT on CPU#2
    > ESR value before enabling vector: 00000000
    > ESR value after enabling vector: 00000000
    > Calibrating delay loop... 6107.95 BogoMIPS
    > CPU: Before vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000, vendor = 0
    > CPU: L1 I cache: 12K, L1 D cache: 8K
    > CPU: L2 cache: 512K
    > CPU: Physical Processor ID: 3
    > Intel machine check reporting enabled on CPU#2.
    > CPU: After vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    > CPU: After generic, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    > CPU: Common caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    > CPU2: Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU 3.06GHz stepping 09
    > Booting processor 3/7 eip 2000
    > Initializing CPU#3
    > masked ExtINT on CPU#3
    > ESR value before enabling vector: 00000000
    > ESR value after enabling vector: 00000000
    > Calibrating delay loop... 6107.95 BogoMIPS
    > CPU: Before vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000, vendor = 0
    > CPU: L1 I cache: 12K, L1 D cache: 8K
    > CPU: L2 cache: 512K
    > CPU: Physical Processor ID: 3
    > Intel machine check reporting enabled on CPU#3.
    > CPU: After vendor init, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    > CPU: After generic, caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    > CPU: Common caps: bfebfbff 00000000 00000000 00000000
    > CPU3: Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU 3.06GHz stepping 09
    > Total of 4 processors activated (24418.71 BogoMIPS).
    >
    >
    > It has 6 x 2GB dimms in it for a total of 12GB of RAM.
    >
    > On the surface this looks like a nice little package.
    >
    > The problem is...
    > I think that my Linux kernel is configured such that it can only
    > address some of it.
    >
    > For example, when I run 'top', I see this:
    >
    > [root@moi tmp]# top
    > (null) 12:52pm up 6 days, 20:21, 1 user, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.00
    > 60 processes: 59 sleeping, 1 running, 0 zombie, 0 stopped
    > CPU0 states: 0.0% user, 0.0% system, 0.0% nice, 100.0% idle
    > CPU1 states: 0.0% user, 0.0% system, 0.0% nice, 100.0% idle
    > CPU2 states: 0.0% user, 0.0% system, 0.0% nice, 100.0% idle
    > CPU3 states: 0.0% user, 0.0% system, 0.0% nice, 100.0% idle
    > Mem: 1027716K av, 333864K used, 693852K free, 192K shrd, 93952K buff
    > Swap: 2096472K av, 0K used, 2096472K free 149732K cached
    >
    > It appears that I only have 1027716K of RAM which can be seen by Linux.
    >
    > How do I confirm this?
    >
    > A related and more important question,
    > "How do I configure my 32 bit Linux so it can see 12GB of RAM?"
    >
    > It must be possible if the V65x allows me to put 12GB RAM in the chasis.
    >
    > -moi


    You will need to recompile your kernel 2.4.x with 64GB High Memory support.

    Note that's not the 4GB High Memory support, otherwise it will only use
    4GB :0 . If your kernel 2.4.9 doesn't have the 64GB High Memory option
    then you will need to upgrade your kernel (my kernel 2.4.25 does).

    --
    Ben M.

    ----------------
    What are Software Patents for?
    To protect the small enterprise from bigger companies.

    What do Software Patents do?
    In its current form, they protect only companies with
    big legal departments as they:
    a.) Patent everything no matter how general
    b.) Sue everybody. Even if the patent can be argued
    invalid, small companies can ill-afford the
    typical $500k cost of a law-suit (not to mention
    years of harassment).

    Don't let them take away your right to program
    whatever you like. Make a stand on Software Patents
    before its too late.

    Read about the ongoing battle at http://swpat.ffii.org/
    ----------------

  3. Re: How to address LARGE (12GB) amounts of RAM?

    All,

    does anyone out there have a simple recipe I could follow to
    recompile my kernel 2.4.x with 64GB High Memory support?

    I've never relinked a linux kernel before,
    but I want to learn!

    plz respond here:
    comp.os.linux.admin

    Thanks,

    -moi


    >
    > You will need to recompile your kernel 2.4.x with 64GB High Memory support.
    >
    > Note that's not the 4GB High Memory support, otherwise it will only use
    > 4GB :0 . If your kernel 2.4.9 doesn't have the 64GB High Memory option
    > then you will need to upgrade your kernel (my kernel 2.4.25 does).
    >
    > --
    > Ben M.
    >
    > ----------------
    > What are Software Patents for?
    > To protect the small enterprise from bigger companies.
    >
    > What do Software Patents do?
    > In its current form, they protect only companies with
    > big legal departments as they:
    > a.) Patent everything no matter how general
    > b.) Sue everybody. Even if the patent can be argued
    > invalid, small companies can ill-afford the
    > typical $500k cost of a law-suit (not to mention
    > years of harassment).
    >
    > Don't let them take away your right to program
    > whatever you like. Make a stand on Software Patents
    > before its too late.
    >
    > Read about the ongoing battle at http://swpat.ffii.org/
    > ----------------


  4. Re: How to address LARGE (12GB) amounts of RAM?

    Equis Uno wrote:
    >
    > does anyone out there have a simple recipe I could follow to
    > recompile my kernel 2.4.x with 64GB High Memory support?
    >
    > I've never relinked a linux kernel before,
    > but I want to learn!


    It isn't all that hard really. The basics are listed below but
    you'll have to do the configuring yourself and include the
    options your system needs.

    If your using the same kernel version then edit the Makefile and
    add something to the EXTRAVERSION= line so it doesn't overwrite
    the current kernel modules.

    If you have already compiled a kernel and want to use the same
    configuration other than a couple of changes you may want to save
    the ".config" file to an alternate file. Then after running
    "make mrproper" you can copy it back into place and then run
    "make menuconfig" and make any changes needed. This will save you
    from having to go through and re-configuring ecerything again.


    make mrproper
    make menuconfig

    configure kernel for your system

    make dep
    make clean
    make bzImage

    # Make and install modules if configured to use modules.
    make modules
    make modules_install

    # Install kernel manually
    cp arch/i386/boot/bzImage /boot/vmlinuz-2.4.xx #2.4.xx = version
    cp System.map /boot/System.map-2.4.xx

    vi /etc/lilo.conf
    add a section for the new kernel.
    run "lilo -v" to up date the MBR

    If you use grub then add a section for the new kernel in the
    grub.conf file.


    --
    Confucius: He who play in root, eventually kill tree.
    Registered with The Linux Counter. http://counter.li.org/
    Slackware 9.1.0 Kernel 2.4.25 SMP i686 (GCC) 3.3.3
    Uptime: 14 days, 18:46, 2 users, load average: 0.99, 1.10, 1.1

+ Reply to Thread