ntp configuration file keeps resetting to installation default - Linux

This is a discussion on ntp configuration file keeps resetting to installation default - Linux ; I'm trying to setup ntpd for my network but am having numerous problems. For the moment, I have only one question for a single problem that has really annoyed me for over a week now. My /etc/ntp.conf keeps resetting to ...

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Thread: ntp configuration file keeps resetting to installation default

  1. ntp configuration file keeps resetting to installation default

    I'm trying to setup ntpd for my network but am having numerous problems.
    For the moment, I have only one question for a single problem that has
    really annoyed me for over a week now.

    My /etc/ntp.conf keeps resetting to the default conf from the install,
    every time I boot the computer.

    The old ntp.conf gets moved to /etc/ntp.conf.sv and the default conf
    takes its place. Since the default conf is not suitable (no ntp sync
    servers listed) this will not do at all. I'm having to manually
    # cp /etc/ntp.conf.sv /etc/ntp.conf
    # /etc/init.d/ntpd start
    each time I boot the computer.

    Here's my system:
    Gentoo Linux (1.4, latest stable updates)
    vanilla-sources-2.4.24
    net-misc/ntp-4.1.2

    The first thing I did was search google for others who have had the same
    problem with no hits. I then searched forums.gentoo.org with no luck.

    So I searched for other files on my computer ending in .sv. I got three
    results:
    # find /etc/ -iname '*.sv'
    /etc/resolv.conf.sv
    /etc/yp.conf.sv
    /etc/ntp.conf.sv
    #
    The only results google gives is for /etc/resolv.conf.sv. Amongst
    others, the manpage for dhcp comes up (with it replacing resolv.conf
    when the client receives its DNS options). So I read man ntpd and found
    nothing on the config being replaced.

    Then I read /etc/init.d/ntpd with the no result. Just in case, I removed
    it from startup. Rebooted. Config file was renamed and replaced still.
    Strange.

    I then thought it might be filesystems corruption. So I rebooted with
    the Gentoo LiveCD and fsck all the volumes. No problem.

    Whilst I was there, I did however, mount the root partition to see if
    the /etc/ntp.conf had been replaced. Result! It hadn't, so some progress
    there. It wasn't being replaced on shutdown.

    So I took the CD out and booted in single user mode. The file had been
    replaced. Doh!

    Continuing, I tried searching the startup/config scripts for references
    to ntp.conf:
    # grep -R 'ntp.conf' /etc/
    /etc/init.d/ntpd: if [ ! -f /etc/ntp.conf ] ; then
    /etc/init.d/ntpd: eerror "Please create /etc/ntp.conf"
    /etc/init.d/ntpd: eerror "Sample conf:
    /usr/share/ntp/ntp.conf"
    #
    Bah! I knew that already.

    So for some random reason (desperation perhaps), I decided to completely
    remove all traces of vanilla-sources-2.4.24 and reinstall/recompile it.
    So, as usual, I booted the previous kernel (vanilla-sources-2.4.23) and
    removed/reinstalled/recompiled vanilla-sources-2.4.24.

    Whilst I was waiting for the compile, I had a look to see if
    /etc/ntp.conf had been replaced. It hadn't. Huh? I took it as a good
    omen for my quest.

    So I booted with the new kernel. /etc/ntp.conf was replaced again.
    After many reboots it seems that the conf gets replaced with
    vanilla-sources-2.4.24 but not with vanilla-sources-2.4.23. This baffles
    me as I thought that they used the same startup/configuration files!

    This is where I have ran out of steam/ideas. So now I'm trying the
    newsgroups. I must be missing something here. If someone could point
    the obvious out or send me on a new line of research it would be of
    great help. I'll post if I find anything new.

    Thanks,
    --
    Ben M.

    PS. How was my post for advice. I am trying my hardest to "Ask questions
    the smart way" - http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html. Did
    you like/hate the way I put it? Please let me know so I can ask better
    in the future.

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  2. Re: ntp configuration file keeps resetting to installation default- RESOLVED

    Lol, found the solution. dhcpd is the culprit. It overwrites
    /etc/ntp.conf whether or not it is given anything about ntp. So close
    yet so far. Huh.

    --
    Ben M.

    ----------------
    What are Software Patents for?
    To protect the small enterprise from bigger companies.

    What do Software Patents do?
    In its current form, they protect only companies with
    big legal departments as they:
    a.) Patent everything no matter how general
    b.) Sue everybody. Even if the patent can be argued
    invalid, small companies can ill-afford the
    typical $500k cost of a law-suit (not to mention
    years of harassment).

    Don't let them take away your right to program
    whatever you like. Make a stand on Software Patents
    before its too late.

    Read about the ongoing battle at http://swpat.ffii.org/
    ----------------


  3. Re: ntp configuration file keeps resetting to installation default

    Visit twiki.ntp.org, and see item 8.4 on the main page (ntp.conf and dhcpd).

    H

  4. Re: ntp configuration file keeps resetting to installation default- RESOLVED

    In article ,
    Ben Measures wrote:
    >Lol, found the solution. dhcpd is the culprit. It overwrites
    >/etc/ntp.conf whether or not it is given anything about ntp.


    Two comments:
    1) The culprit is the client, dhcpcd, not the server.
    2) I don't believe dhcpcd does anything unless the server claims to have
    NTP information.

  5. Re: ntp configuration file keeps resetting to installation default- RESOLVED

    Allen McIntosh wrote:
    > In article ,
    > Ben Measures wrote:
    >
    >>Lol, found the solution. dhcpd is the culprit. It overwrites
    >>/etc/ntp.conf whether or not it is given anything about ntp.

    >
    >
    > Two comments:
    > 1) The culprit is the client, dhcpcd, not the server.
    > 2) I don't believe dhcpcd does anything unless the server claims to have
    > NTP information.


    Heh, thats what I meant. I was in a hurry to mark the thread resolved.

    I tried to take the whole thing back. Oh the shame.

    --
    Ben M.

    ----------------
    What are Software Patents for?
    To protect the small enterprise from bigger companies.

    What do Software Patents do?
    In its current form, they protect only companies with
    big legal departments as they:
    a.) Patent everything no matter how general
    b.) Sue everybody. Even if the patent can be argued
    invalid, small companies can ill-afford the
    typical $500k cost of a law-suit (not to mention
    years of harassment).

    Don't let them take away your right to program
    whatever you like. Make a stand on Software Patents
    before its too late.

    Read about the ongoing battle at http://swpat.ffii.org/
    ----------------


  6. Re: ntp configuration file keeps resetting to installation default- RESOLVED

    Harlan Stenn wrote:
    > Visit twiki.ntp.org, and see item 8.4 on the main page (ntp.conf and dhcpd).
    >
    > H


    Thanks for your reply, thats exactly the resolution I need.

    --
    Ben M.

    ----------------
    What are Software Patents for?
    To protect the small enterprise from bigger companies.

    What do Software Patents do?
    In its current form, they protect only companies with
    big legal departments as they:
    a.) Patent everything no matter how general
    b.) Sue everybody. Even if the patent can be argued
    invalid, small companies can ill-afford the
    typical $500k cost of a law-suit (not to mention
    years of harassment).

    Don't let them take away your right to program
    whatever you like. Make a stand on Software Patents
    before its too late.

    Read about the ongoing battle at http://swpat.ffii.org/
    ----------------


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