need floppy based disk imaging tool for Red Hat 9 - Linux

This is a discussion on need floppy based disk imaging tool for Red Hat 9 - Linux ; Have Red Hat 9 with ext3 and linux-swap partitions. Looking for a disk-imaging tool (something like Symantec's Ghost). Would like to: a. Boot off a floppy. b. Use the imaging tool (on the floppy) to make a hard disk image. ...

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Thread: need floppy based disk imaging tool for Red Hat 9

  1. need floppy based disk imaging tool for Red Hat 9

    Have Red Hat 9 with ext3 and linux-swap partitions.
    Looking for a disk-imaging tool (something like Symantec's Ghost).

    Would like to:
    a. Boot off a floppy.
    b. Use the imaging tool (on the floppy) to make a hard disk image.
    c. Store the image on another PC via FTP, SMB, etc. (Networking
    support.)
    d. In case of a disaster, would like to use the image to recreate the
    system on a new hard disk.
    e. This disk-imaging tool should be open source or freeware.

    Appreciate your suggestions.

  2. Re: need floppy based disk imaging tool for Red Hat 9

    If you have SMB support in your kernel at the moment, its reasonably
    simple to make your own boot disk. If you feel up to it, I'd be happy to
    help you out with the creation of it.

    luther wrote:
    > Have Red Hat 9 with ext3 and linux-swap partitions.
    > Looking for a disk-imaging tool (something like Symantec's Ghost).
    >
    > Would like to:
    > a. Boot off a floppy.
    > b. Use the imaging tool (on the floppy) to make a hard disk image.
    > c. Store the image on another PC via FTP, SMB, etc. (Networking
    > support.)
    > d. In case of a disaster, would like to use the image to recreate the
    > system on a new hard disk.
    > e. This disk-imaging tool should be open source or freeware.
    >
    > Appreciate your suggestions.



  3. Re: need floppy based disk imaging tool for Red Hat 9

    In comp.os.linux.admin luther wrote:
    > Have Red Hat 9 with ext3 and linux-swap partitions.
    > Looking for a disk-imaging tool (something like Symantec's Ghost).
    >
    > Would like to:
    > a. Boot off a floppy.


    Yes, or a CD, or from the Network. Or, you can reinstall from lilo.

    > b. Use the imaging tool (on the floppy) to make a hard disk image.


    Hmmm, not usually.

    > c. Store the image on another PC via FTP, SMB, etc. (Networking
    > support.)


    Certainly, but you access it via rsync, optionally protected via ssh.

    > d. In case of a disaster, would like to use the image to recreate the
    > system on a new hard disk.


    Certainly.

    > e. This disk-imaging tool should be open source or freeware.


    Yup.

    Have a look at System Imager (www.systemimager.org). Its supported by
    HP, the documentation is good, updates are really easy (it uses rsync,
    so the "image" is a non-compressed directory on a server. It can do
    non-interactive autoinstalls, handle disks of different sizes fairly
    easily, and supports overrides for each host.

    Contrary to what the documentation says, you don't need to use
    /etc/hosts, its quite happy using DNS.

    If you're still not sure, check out the IRC channel #sisuite on
    irc.systemimager.org. There aren't a lot of people in the channel
    usually, but its still quite helpful. There's also a mailing list.

    I use it in my lab to maintain 12 Debian machines. When an update comes
    out, I just apt-get upgrade on my golden client, test it a bit, upload
    the changes to the server (it doesn't take very long), then use dsh to
    run updateclient on all of the clone machines. The re-sync doesn't take
    long, but if you're doing them all at the same time, use a switch, not a
    hub.

    My machines aren't homogeneous either. They are all x86, but they have
    different hardware (about three types, with a wider selection of video
    cards). I deal with these differences myself, adding some startup
    scripts of my own creation to install the right XF86Config, load the
    right module for the NIC and Sound, etc. You could also do this using
    discover (what Knoppix uses), or in the case of RedHat, Kudzu I guess.

    Future versions of systemimager will support reliable multicast, so it
    will be more efficient.

    Two things to think about are host SSH keys (these could be managed
    using an override (a host-specific patch if you like, to the image).
    The other item is logs. This should be easy enough to manage, just don't
    write /var/log/ when you run updateclient.

    --
    Cameron Kerr
    cameron.kerr@paradise.net.nz : http://nzgeeks.org/cameron/
    Empowered by Perl!

  4. Re: need floppy based disk imaging tool for Red Hat 9

    luther wrote:
    > Have Red Hat 9 with ext3 and linux-swap partitions.
    > Looking for a disk-imaging tool (something like Symantec's Ghost).
    >
    > Would like to:
    > a. Boot off a floppy.


    Find Busybox, will seriously cut down on the file size of
    utilities. Build your own kernel with the absolute minimum
    hardware support for your machine. (Ex: You don't need USB
    support for this unless your keyboard is USB.)

    Or you can use a Knoppix bootable CD.

    > b. Use the imaging tool (on the floppy) to make a hard disk image.


    That's what they are used for...

    > c. Store the image on another PC via FTP, SMB, etc. (Networking
    > support.)


    Check. Easiest (MHO) is NFS. Not sure about doing this
    with FTP, you have to store the image file someplace before
    uploading to FTP server...

    If you do the floppy approach when you build the custom
    kernel make sure you include your network card as a built
    it. (I wouldn't use loadable modules on a floppy boot,
    takes more space and is more work to get going)

    > d. In case of a disaster, would like to use the image to recreate the
    > system on a new hard disk.


    That's the general idea..

    > e. This disk-imaging tool should be open source or freeware.


    man dd

    dd if=/dev/hda|gzip>/mnt/nfsmountpoint/image

    Note the use of gzip.

    When I did this a couple years ago I wrote a little C
    program to write huge files of 0x00 first. When you delete
    a file all the bits on the disk that make up the file are
    left, i.e. a mix of 1s and 0s, the rm command just removes
    the entry from the directory and marks the inodes as free.
    gzip will compress blocks of 0s much better than blocks of
    mixed 1s and 0s.

    --
    Kevin D. Snodgrass
    Help our soldiers in the field:
    http://www.operationac.org/
    Help our soldiers in the hospital:
    http://www.woundedwarriorhospitalfund.org/


  5. Re: need floppy based disk imaging tool for Red Hat 9

    lothario@email.com (luther) wrote in message news:...
    > Have Red Hat 9 with ext3 and linux-swap partitions.
    > Looking for a disk-imaging tool (something like Symantec's Ghost).
    >
    > Would like to:
    > a. Boot off a floppy.
    > b. Use the imaging tool (on the floppy) to make a hard disk image.


    Where do you propose to write this hd image? Can you write it to a
    second, local hd till you transfer it to the server?

    > c. Store the image on another PC via FTP, SMB, etc. (Networking
    > support.)
    > d. In case of a disaster, would like to use the image to recreate the
    > system on a new hard disk.


    Note that you will need physical access to the restored box, boot it
    from floppy ( grub floppy would be handy) and set up the boot loader
    properly in the MBR just in case. (Not aware of a tool that handles
    this with 100% reliability across a network connection). Assume
    you're trying to avoid doing an install process.

    > e. This disk-imaging tool should be open source or freeware.
    >
    > Appreciate your suggestions.


    My question above relates to my limited use of disk imaging tools
    other than S. Ghost. However, I do know and have good experience with
    the "drive copy" tools that come with new hard drives. These
    utilities are specific to each manufacturer but are available for free
    download. They boot from floppy, are wholly self-contained, are very
    fast, can verify media reliability, but will not copy to a network
    location (I believe, need to double check). Good for making back-up
    hard drives.

    From Google I did find the usual suspects (many folks use a script
    driving dd) and these utilities:
    Search: linux file utilities ghost
    http://www.partimage.org/ >>> gets my vote from limited personal use
    http://kennethhunt.com/archives/000393.html
    http://www.desktop-linux.net/backups.htm

    hth,
    prg
    email above disabled

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