linux in local partition?? - Linux

This is a discussion on linux in local partition?? - Linux ; Hi, Could I install linux operating system on Logical partition drive instead of primary partition C drive?? I have only on disk in my PC, I am using partition magic to partition a disk from C drive as logical partition. ...

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  1. linux in local partition??

    Hi, Could I install linux operating system on Logical partition drive
    instead of primary partition C drive??
    I have only on disk in my PC, I am using partition magic to partition a
    disk from C drive as logical partition.
    I am new in Linux operating. Thanks in advance.


  2. Re: linux in logical partition??

    I meant to say install linux in logical partition. Sorry

    cljlk wrote:

    > Hi, Could I install linux operating system on Logical partition drive
    > instead of primary partition C drive??
    > I have only on disk in my PC, I am using partition magic to partition a
    > disk from C drive as logical partition.
    > I am new in Linux operating. Thanks in advance.
    >



  3. Re: linux in local partition??

    cljlk wrote:

    > Hi, Could I install linux operating system on Logical partition drive
    > instead of primary partition C drive??


    .... yes, but more specifically, to a "logical" partition
    (and not "C" drive - this is m$ terminology)
    ..
    --
    /// Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer, skydiver, \\\
    \\\ and author: "Inside Linux", "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed" ///
    \\\ http://pages.sbcglobal.net/mtobler/mjt_linux_page.html ///
    If you can't learn to do it well, learn to enjoy doing it badly.


  4. Re: linux in local partition??

    I am re-installing RedHat9.0 since I did not set up swap space which
    should be 256Mb. I have 128Mb memmory.
    I highlight:
    /dev/hda5 ex3
    then, I press new buttion, it opens a window "Add Partition"
    I select the mount mount / and enger 1000Mb for /, which is 1G-byte.
    Select the radio box "Fill all spce up to 1000Mb. Press on button "OK"
    A "Error Partitioning" window open immediately say:
    Could not allocate requested partition: Partitioning failed:
    Could not allocate partitions as primary partitions.

    Would anyone please shed a light, I need to set up swap, make partition.

    Thanks.......
    Richard Steiner wrote:

    > Here in comp.os.linux.misc, cljlk spake unto us, saying:
    >
    >
    >>Hi, Could I install linux operating system on Logical partition drive
    >>instead of primary partition C drive??

    >
    >
    > Most non-Microsoft operating systems (including Linux, OS/2, and BeOS)
    > can be installed in a logical partition and boot from that partition.
    >
    > The inability to do so is largely limited to DOS or Windows variants
    > and classic Unix variants (e.g., FreeBSD or Solaris).
    >



  5. Re: linux in local partition??

    In article <3F758609.9020708@hotmail.com>,
    cljlk writes:
    >
    > I am re-installing RedHat9.0 since I did not set up swap space which
    > should be 256Mb. I have 128Mb memmory.
    > I highlight:
    > /dev/hda5 ex3
    > then, I press new buttion, it opens a window "Add Partition"
    > I select the mount mount / and enger 1000Mb for /, which is 1G-byte.
    > Select the radio box "Fill all spce up to 1000Mb. Press on button "OK"
    > A "Error Partitioning" window open immediately say:
    > Could not allocate requested partition: Partitioning failed:
    > Could not allocate partitions as primary partitions.
    >
    > Would anyone please shed a light, I need to set up swap, make partition.


    I'd have to try re-installing Red Hat to be sure, but I think what's
    happening is that all your disk space is already allocated to partitions,
    so you can't add a new one. You'll need to delete a partition to make
    room for new partitions. Of course, doing so will delete any files
    currently on those partitions. Alternatively, you could use GNU Parted,
    PartitionMagic, or some such to shrink an existing partition without
    deleting files on it. (I don't believe RH includes any dynamic partition
    resizers in its installation routines, but I could be mistaken about
    that.)

    --
    Rod Smith, rodsmith@rodsbooks.com
    http://www.rodsbooks.com
    Author of books on Linux, FreeBSD, and networking

  6. Re: linux in local partition??

    Lo and behold, Richard Steiner sayeth:
    > Here in comp.os.linux.misc, cljlk spake unto us,
    > saying:
    >
    >> Hi, Could I install linux operating system on Logical partition

    drive
    >> instead of primary partition C drive??

    >
    > Most non-Microsoft operating systems (including Linux, OS/2, and

    BeOS)
    > can be installed in a logical partition and boot from that

    partition.
    >


    Some Windows OSs too such as Windows 2000 or XP.

    > The inability to do so is largely limited to DOS or Windows variants
    > and classic Unix variants (e.g., FreeBSD or Solaris).


    --
    --
    Remove COLLECTIVERECTUM to e-mail.



  7. Re: linux in local partition??

    ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.os.linux.setup.]
    On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 02:07:02 +0100,
    EvilBill[AGQx] wrote:
    > Lo and behold, Richard Steiner sayeth:
    > > Here in comp.os.linux.misc, cljlk spake unto us,
    > > saying:
    > >
    > >> Hi, Could I install linux operating system on Logical partition
    > >> drive instead of primary partition C drive??

    > >
    > > Most non-Microsoft operating systems (including Linux, OS/2, and
    > > BeOS) can be installed in a logical partition and boot from that
    > > partition.
    > >

    >
    > Some Windows OSs too such as Windows 2000 or XP.


    For Dos/Windows You can store the bulk in a logical partition, but you
    still need to boot from a primary partition. In NT/2K/XP: ntldr,
    boot.ini, ntdetect.com are in the root of what was the active primary
    partition when you installed.

    Michael C.
    --
    mcsuper5@usol.com http://mcsuper5.freeshell.org/
    Registered Linux User #303915 http://counter.li.org/



  8. Re: linux in local partition??

    In , on 09/26/2003
    at 09:48 AM, cljlk said:

    >Hi, Could I install linux operating system on Logical partition drive
    > instead of primary partition C drive??


    I've never installed Linux on a primary drive, much less on C. The
    only things[1] I've ever put on primary partions are DOS and OS/2 Boot
    Manager. Everything else I put on logical drives in extended logical
    partitions.

    >I am using partition magic


    Keep good backups and make sure you have a sector editor; PQ PM is not
    housebroken.

    [1] I don't do windoze.

    --
    Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT

    Unsolicited bulk E-mail will be subject to legal action. I reserve
    the right to publicly post or ridicule any abusive E-mail.

    Reply to domain Patriot dot net user shmuel+news to contact me. Do
    not reply to spamtrap@library.lspace.org


  9. Re: linux in local partition??


    "joseph philip" wrote in message
    newsan.2003.09.27.17.02.29.823224@nntp.will.suffice...
    > On Sat, 27 Sep 2003 08:43:53 -0400, cljlk wrote:
    >
    > > I am re-installing RedHat9.0 since I did not set up swap space which
    > > should be 256Mb. I have 128Mb memmory. I highlight:
    > > /dev/hda5 ex3
    > > then, I press new buttion, it opens a window "Add Partition" I select
    > > the mount mount / and enger 1000Mb for /, which is 1G-byte. Select the
    > > radio box "Fill all spce up to 1000Mb. Press on button "OK" A "Error
    > > Partitioning" window open immediately say: Could not allocate requested
    > > partition: Partitioning failed: Could not allocate partitions as primary
    > > partitions.
    > >
    > > Would anyone please shed a light, I need to set up swap, make partition.

    >
    >
    > The root partition needs to be a "primary" partition. That means, it will
    > be refered to as "hda1, hda2, hda3 or hda4" In your case, you have created
    > a second primary partition ( named hda2) and set it as an "extended
    > partition" that is, a partition that contains more partitions. The
    > contained partitions are NOT primary partitions, and are NOT bootable by
    > the bios.


    I believe this claim is mistaken. I seem to remember, although I'd have to
    look, setting up a triple boot machine that had its 3rd Linux installation
    on entirely extended partitions.



    > Solution:
    > Use the following partitioning:
    > hda2 / (root) 500MB
    > hda3 extended -REST-OF-THE-DISK- (12GB ? )
    > hda5 swap 256MB
    > hda6 /usr 3000MB
    > hda7 /home 2000MB
    >


    Or much more simply.

    hda2 / rest of disk
    hda3 swap 1000MB

    The days of needing to split up your root partition inito multiple disks for
    no compelling performance reason are gone. Dead, over, pushing up daisies,
    etc., etc. The reason for the extensive disk fragmentation into multiple
    partitions had to do with LILO limitations of the "/boot" directory bearing
    partition, backup systems such as "restore" that were disk based rather than
    active file-system based, etc. And in those cases, those separate partitions
    were often separate disks, which forced fragementation of your file system
    this way.

    The only partitions you must have now are /, and many installers insist on
    having a swap partition even when you can get away without having one. If
    you have a userbase that needs some limits wrapped around "/home", or you
    are running a big mailserver that would benefit from running "/var/spool"
    with a reiserfs file system and the access-time turned off on that
    partition, great, do it. But don't do it without a compelling reason.
    Repartitiong all the fiddly little bits is a pain in the ass.



  10. Re: linux in local partition??

    In article ,
    "Nico Kadel-Garcia" writes:
    >
    > The days of needing to split up your root partition inito multiple disks for
    > no compelling performance reason are gone.

    ....
    > The only partitions you must have now are /, and many installers insist on
    > having a swap partition even when you can get away without having one. If
    > you have a userbase that needs some limits wrapped around "/home", or you
    > are running a big mailserver that would benefit from running "/var/spool"
    > with a reiserfs file system and the access-time turned off on that
    > partition, great, do it. But don't do it without a compelling reason.
    > Repartitiong all the fiddly little bits is a pain in the ass.


    This is largely a matter of personal preference, of course, but I like
    putting /home and /usr/local on their own partitions so that I can wipe
    out the main OS and install fresh (or install another distribution)
    without risking my user files or locally-compiled programs. As you
    suggest, there are specialized reasons to put other directories on their
    own partitions, too.

    IMHO, a good setup for newbies is to have root (/), /home, and a swap
    partition. If they're installing on particularly old hardware, a separate
    /boot partition located below the 1024-cylinder mark may be in order,
    too, but that's becoming rare. Non-newbies probably have a good enough
    idea of what they're doing to design their own partitioning scheme as
    they see fit.

    --
    Rod Smith, rodsmith@rodsbooks.com
    http://www.rodsbooks.com
    Author of books on Linux, FreeBSD, and networking

  11. Re: linux in local partition??

    [Please note Followup...]

    In , rodsmith@nessus.rodsbooks.com:

    [Snip...]

    > IMHO, a good setup for newbies is to have root (/), /home, and a swap
    > partition.


    Agreed; for most SOHO/workstations, this is fine. IME, some server installs
    which face potential DoS attacks might want to put /tmp and /var (for large
    data and log file overruns, respectively) on separate partitions (to remain
    accessible, even if these storage areas are overrun).

    And I agree generally with both you and Nico: partition-happy installs just
    don't make sense for most newbies and SOHO enviromnents.

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at airmail, dotted with net. DO NOT SPAM IT.
    Standard Disclaimer: These are my opinions not Internet America.

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