Re: Interesting article about Linux at InternetWeek - Linux

This is a discussion on Re: Interesting article about Linux at InternetWeek - Linux ; wrote in message news: ... > Microsoft force every user to register online and insist that the user may > not perform substantial hardware upgrades. In effect, this guarantees that > all licenses have a limited lifetime. At some stage ...

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Thread: Re: Interesting article about Linux at InternetWeek

  1. Re: Interesting article about Linux at InternetWeek

    wrote in message news:...


    > Microsoft force every user to register online and insist that the user may
    > not perform substantial hardware upgrades. In effect, this guarantees that
    > all licenses have a limited lifetime. At some stage the user must upgrade and
    > buy a new license, for a newer version.


    Not true here, although you will be prompted to reactivate and if you
    have a retail home version it may even require you to contact
    Microsoft to tell them who you are and that you just upgraded your
    machine. You will not have to buy a new license to use XP when you
    upgrade your machine.

    Beyond that I the rest for brevity and basically agree with
    your comments on the freedom of choice and implications of Microsoft.

    Of course the things you state and many of us argue never come into
    play in the boardroom....on another thread and in my own experiences I
    have heard often the expression "You never get fired for buying IBM."
    being changed to "You never get fired for buying Microsoft."

    Marketing may in the end decide the fate of Linux, I for one hope that
    Microsoft keeps sleeping at the wheel and ignoring the potential of
    Linux long enough to weaken their marketing engine.

    Keith.

  2. Re: Interesting article about Linux at InternetWeek

    spamgotcha@workingworld.ca (Keith Benedict) wrote in message news:<76b7dd44.0306270312.5fb83922@posting.google.com>...
    > wrote in message news:...
    >
    >
    > > Microsoft force every user to register online and insist that the user may
    > > not perform substantial hardware upgrades. In effect, this guarantees that
    > > all licenses have a limited lifetime. At some stage the user must upgrade and
    > > buy a new license, for a newer version.

    >
    > Not true here, although you will be prompted to reactivate and if you
    > have a retail home version it may even require you to contact
    > Microsoft to tell them who you are and that you just upgraded your
    > machine. You will not have to buy a new license to use XP when you
    > upgrade your machine.


    Like this is much better...

  3. Re: Interesting article about Linux at InternetWeek

    jedithezealot@yahoo.com (JEDIDIAH) wrote in message news:<5121813f.0306271219.304a85d6@posting.google.com>...
    > spamgotcha@workingworld.ca (Keith Benedict) wrote in message news:<76b7dd44.0306270312.5fb83922@posting.google.com>...
    > > wrote in message news:...
    > >
    > >
    > > > Microsoft force every user to register online and insist that the user may
    > > > not perform substantial hardware upgrades. In effect, this guarantees that
    > > > all licenses have a limited lifetime. At some stage the user must upgrade and
    > > > buy a new license, for a newer version.

    > >
    > > Not true here, although you will be prompted to reactivate and if you
    > > have a retail home version it may even require you to contact
    > > Microsoft to tell them who you are and that you just upgraded your
    > > machine. You will not have to buy a new license to use XP when you
    > > upgrade your machine.

    >
    > Like this is much better...


    I agree, its not any better AFAIK because I've had to do it a few
    times for people that didn't have a good internet connections and
    actually had to phone in the activation. Ever want to go insane...try
    that sometime.

    But whether its better or not I wasn't advocating Windows there, just
    pointing out his error in the "Buy another License" statement.

    Keith.

  4. Re: Interesting article about Linux at InternetWeek

    wrote in message news:...
    > In comp.os.linux Keith Benedict wrote:
    > > wrote in message news:...
    > >

    >
    > >> Microsoft force every user to register online and insist that the user may
    > >> not perform substantial hardware upgrades. In effect, this guarantees that
    > >> all licenses have a limited lifetime. At some stage the user must upgrade and
    > >> buy a new license, for a newer version.

    >
    > > Not true here, although you will be prompted to reactivate and if you
    > > have a retail home version it may even require you to contact
    > > Microsoft to tell them who you are and that you just upgraded your
    > > machine. You will not have to buy a new license to use XP when you
    > > upgrade your machine.

    >
    > I'm sure that the whole world feels a lot safer now that they have your
    > personal guarantee on that issue but meanwhile back in reality the problem
    > remains that Microsoft offers no such guarantee. Both the license itself
    > and the protection mechanism only provide for the support of one particular
    > PC configuration so the only thing you can be sure of is that they will
    > allow you to use it the first time.
    >
    > This URL covers most of their policy:
    >
    > http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/basi...ion/mpafaq.asp



    Yes and read it I have, I didn't state my personal guarentee on the
    issue...where in that did I use the term gaurentee? You must be
    misreading my post.

    As for the facts, read the link you provided. I am not advocating
    windows, simply stating that as per their own policies as you
    convienently pointed out to us, Microsoft will allow you to reinstall
    and transfer the software as per the legal agreement of said software.

    Now in the case of XP, it is fully transferable if you remove the
    product from the previous machine...or in the case of a significant
    upgrade where the machine believes it is a new machine you'd simply go
    on to reactivating.

    I don't care for activation, I personally dislike it very much, but
    the fact of the matter is someone stated *YOU MUST* buy a new license
    if you upgrade your machine. I simply corrected this as
    misinformation doesn't do anything for Linux or Windows beyond
    spreading FUD.


    > The point is that when you must go back and ask permission to use the
    > software again, re-activation is at Microsoft's discretion and they
    > don't give any written promise that what you call an upgrade, they
    > might call a "different PC". Here is a quote from their page:
    >


    Which is why I dislike it, but I didnt say I liked it...I simply said
    he was worng for spreading the idea you have to buy something again
    for a simple upgrade.



    Simply stated we all dislike it which is why I am not in a Microsoft
    Advocacy group cheering up and down....But at least we can dislike it
    for the real reasons.

    Keith.

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