M$FT--what a powerful company to buy! - Linux

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  1. M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    Why doesn't everybody just buy MSFT (Microsoft) and be done with it!
    What a powerful company--I'm surprised the stock price isn't higher,
    but as a long-term shareholder who doesn't plan to sell, I'm not
    worried.

    Why don't you join the gravy train? This stock and this company
    simply cannot be beat.

    Even their equity investments grow tenfold (Halo developers).

    RL


  2. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    Asstroturfer raylopez99 wrote on behalf of Micoshaft Corporation:

    > Why doesn't everybody just buy MSFT (Microsoft)


    You are spliffing again and posting right?
    Micoshaft stock is sinking along with its Pista crap.

    Download and switch to free Linux and open source software
    and then understand why Micoshaft Corporation hasn't any chances.

    http://www.livecdlist.com
    http://www.ubuntu.com
    http://www.distrowatch.com
    http://www.openoffice.org


  3. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    7 wrote:
    > Asstroturfer raylopez99 wrote on behalf of Micoshaft Corporation:
    >
    >> Why doesn't everybody just buy MSFT (Microsoft)

    >
    > You are spliffing again and posting right?
    > Micoshaft stock is sinking along with its Pista crap.
    >
    > Download and switch to free Linux and open source software
    > and then understand why Micoshaft Corporation hasn't any chances.
    >
    > http://www.livecdlist.com
    > http://www.ubuntu.com
    > http://www.distrowatch.com
    > http://www.openoffice.org


    Or download it and see why Microsoft is so good and has so much of the
    market share (even when the competiton is offered for free).

    YMMV, Rich



  4. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    Rich wrote:

    > 7 wrote:
    >> Asstroturfer raylopez99 wrote on behalf of Micoshaft Corporation:
    >>
    >>> Why doesn't everybody just buy MSFT (Microsoft)

    >>
    >> You are spliffing again and posting right?
    >> Micoshaft stock is sinking along with its Pista crap.
    >>
    >> Download and switch to free Linux and open source software
    >> and then understand why Micoshaft Corporation hasn't any chances.
    >>
    >> http://www.livecdlist.com
    >> http://www.ubuntu.com
    >> http://www.distrowatch.com
    >> http://www.openoffice.org

    >
    > Or download it and see why Microsoft is so good and has so much of the
    > market share (even when the competiton is offered for free).
    >
    > YMMV, Rich



    BWAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHHAAAAA!!!!

    Yes, oh please download it and see if micoshaft
    can beat Linux technology in action!!!

    Or if you are out saving time, go to www.youtube.com
    and search for beryl and compiz and see how the other half live.



  5. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    In comp.os.linux.advocacy, raylopez99

    wrote
    on Fri, 05 Oct 2007 10:06:44 -0700
    <1191604004.399032.282320@y42g2000hsy.googlegroups. com>:
    > Why doesn't everybody just buy MSFT (Microsoft) and be done with it!
    > What a powerful company--I'm surprised the stock price isn't higher,
    > but as a long-term shareholder who doesn't plan to sell, I'm not
    > worried.
    >
    > Why don't you join the gravy train? This stock and this company
    > simply cannot be beat.


    Explain this, then:

    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?t=5y&s...l&c=&c=%5EGSPC
    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?t=5y&s...l&c=&c=%5EIXIC
    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?t=5y&s...=l&c=&c=%5EDJI

    and for that matter this:

    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?t=5y&s...EIXIC&c=%5EDJI

    Granted,

    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?s=MSFT...%5EIXIC,%5EDJI

    suggests RedHat's 5 year performance gain is a bit of a
    fluke, but MSFT is currently underperforming all major
    indexes -- and has been since February of this year.

    Try XOM if you're going to talk up a stock; their track
    record has been rather impressive these last 5 years.
    (No doubt they deliver their sales pitches with, ahem,
    oily precision.)

    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?s=MSFT...%5EIXIC,%5EDJI

    (Disclaimers: I am not an investment advisor. Enter the
    stock market at one's own risk. No warranties expressed
    or implied. Past indicators are not necessarily predictors
    of future growth or value. May cause warts. Not for
    use while intoxicated. Drinking may substantially impair
    investment activity, intentional humor, and the capability
    of standing up without falling over. In case of a nuclear
    attack, stand on the rooftop and say "I LOVE YOU! YOU'RE
    DA BOMB!". Under no circumstances should one jump off into
    outer space while wearing an explosive space modulator.)


    >
    > Even their equity investments grow tenfold (Halo developers).


    Only if one's lucky to be in the team at the right time,
    presumably.

    >
    > RL
    >


    --
    #191, ewill3@earthlink.net
    /dev/signature: No such file or directory

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  6. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    On 2007-10-05 10:06:44 -0700, raylopez99 said:

    > Why doesn't everybody just buy MSFT (Microsoft) and be done with it!
    > What a powerful company--I'm surprised the stock price isn't higher,
    > but as a long-term shareholder who doesn't plan to sell, I'm not
    > worried.
    >
    > Why don't you join the gravy train? This stock and this company
    > simply cannot be beat.
    >
    > Even their equity investments grow tenfold (Halo developers).
    >
    > RL


    Microsoft has always succeeded by copying Apple software (often
    poorly). People are finally realizing they should go directly to
    Apple. Apple's share of the laptop market has grown to 17%. Forget
    MSFT, buy AAPL.


  7. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    On Oct 5, 4:35 pm, MS wrote:
    > On 2007-10-05 10:06:44 -0700, raylopez99 said:
    >
    > Microsoft has always succeeded by copying Apple software (often
    > poorly).


    Not entirely true. Before Apple released the Apple-II, Microsoft
    supported the IMSAI, a big box with toggle switches used to enter the
    instruction and data values, which then read paper tape, which then
    allowed you to enter and run BASIC programs using a Teletype keyboard/
    printer.

    When Steve Jobs showed up with the Apple-II and his nice suit, and a
    monitor that sat on top of the Computer/Keyboard, he stole the show.
    Bill Gates replied by calling all of the attendees of the show a bunch
    of Pirates and Thieves who were stealing his software (which he stole
    from DEC through a time-share company he was working for in the
    1970s).

    > People are finally realizing they should go directly to
    > Apple. Apple's share of the laptop market has grown to 17%. Forget
    > MSFT, buy AAPL.


    That's an older number. According to browser surveys, Apple picked up
    about 40 million PCs last year. Since the release of Vista, Apple's
    share in terms of units sold might be as high as 30%, and in terms of
    revenue could be as high as 50%. Apple machines are still selling for
    over $2000, while Vista-Only machines have dropped to below $500 from
    their original asking price of $1500 for comparable machines.

    This might be a big problem for Microsoft, since Gateway (one of the
    few "pure Microsoft" plays, was on the verge of bankruptcy before
    being purchased by Acer, who has built their market share by selling
    "Linux-Ready" machines at higher profit margins. Dell and HP
    subsidize their PC Vista/Windows market with revenue/profits from
    Printers and HDTV systems.

    Driving down 202 was interesting

    CompUSA - all closed
    PC Warehouse - Closed
    National Computer - Closed

    Several smaller computer stores were only offering used machines.
    The one store that looked busy, had Linux machines on the display
    floor, and there were several shoppers sitting at desks, ignoring the
    Windows machines, and actively engaged with the Linux machines.

    Fortunately for Microsoft, there aren't many of those little
    independent shops around anymore.



  8. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    Ray,are you confusing Microsoft with Google?

    --
    Lubow
    "raylopez99" wrote in message
    news:1191604004.399032.282320@y42g2000hsy.googlegr oups.com...
    > Why doesn't everybody just buy MSFT (Microsoft) and be done with it!
    > What a powerful company--I'm surprised the stock price isn't higher,
    > but as a long-term shareholder who doesn't plan to sell, I'm not
    > worried.
    >
    > Why don't you join the gravy train? This stock and this company
    > simply cannot be beat.
    >
    > Even their equity investments grow tenfold (Halo developers).
    >
    > RL
    >




  9. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    Simplify, Rex Ballard. You're thinking too much and too far ahead.
    One step at a time...

    RL

    BARRONS MAGAZINE
    Microsoft's Halo Effect

    Microsoft (MSFT: Nasdaq) By Goldman Sachs ($29.84, Oct. 9, 2007)

    WE ARE REITERATING OUR Buy on Microsoft and raising our estimates to
    account for the aQuantive acquisition and the Halo 3 videogame.

    Microsoft stands at a major juncture in its lifecycle with Vista and
    Office 2007 launched but with the future bringing forth changing
    technology and business models. However, the near-term bull case is
    compelling.

    Specifically, we expect upside to first-quarter numbers from Halo 3,
    the aQuantive acquisition closing, currency benefits, and ongoing
    traction in new-product cycles such as Office 2007


    On Oct 7, 11:54 am, Rex Ballard wrote:


  10. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    Check out these numbers. Two words: Micro Soft.

    RL


    PC units sold (worldwide), followed by year sold. So for example, in
    1994, 44 million units were sold, while in 2006, 239 million were sold

    44
    59
    69
    0
    0
    107.7
    117
    125
    136
    154
    178
    204
    239


    1994
    1995
    1996
    1997
    1998
    1999
    2000
    2001
    2002
    2003
    2004
    2005
    2006


  11. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2007 08:03:33 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:

    >Specifically, we expect upside to first-quarter numbers from Halo 3,
    >the aQuantive acquisition closing, currency benefits, and ongoing
    >traction in new-product cycles such as Office 2007


    And Windows XP, the product that refuses to die!

  12. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    "Charlie Perrin" wrote in message
    news:7v1rg31t6qm1cov8pci09r001j72j9m2f4@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 10 Oct 2007 08:03:33 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:
    >
    >>Specifically, we expect upside to first-quarter numbers from Halo 3,
    >>the aQuantive acquisition closing, currency benefits, and ongoing
    >>traction in new-product cycles such as Office 2007

    >
    > And Windows XP, the product that refuses to die!


    I was a Beta tester for XP (and Win98 and some other programs) and it
    was pretty good out of the gate. A bit bloated over Win 2000 but newer
    hardware soon took care of that. Worked very well with all my hardware
    during testing. I couldn't find many bugs at all that weren't already
    known. If anyone has doubts about MSFT being a world class
    organization, they should do some beta testing with them. It was
    definitely a rewarding experience. Now if they could just get their
    stock going a bit better, some of my stock funds would like it. ;-)

    Fred


  13. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    On Oct 10, 11:03 am, raylopez99 wrote:
    > Simplify, Rex Ballard. You're thinking too much and too far ahead.
    > One step at a time...
    > RL
    >
    > BARRONS MAGAZINE
    > Microsoft's Halo Effect
    >
    > Microsoft (MSFT: Nasdaq) By Goldman Sachs ($29.84, Oct. 9, 2007)
    >
    > WE ARE REITERATING OUR Buy on Microsoft and raising our estimates to
    > account for the aQuantive acquisition and the Halo 3 videogame.


    Look at the track record. When an analyst "reiterates" a Buy, this
    usually means
    that they have a Whale (usually a client with holdings of $10 million
    or more) who wants
    to dump a substantial quantity of the stock. Usually a mutual fund,
    pension fund,
    or major institutional investor who wants to sell. They need minnows
    who will buy enough
    shares based on reccomendations - to keep the price from falling too
    quickly.

    When they downgrade to a "hold" or a "sell", that usually means they
    have a whale
    who wants to buy in, but at a low target price, and they need to talk
    the price down.

    When looking - it's important to know WHO the analyst is, and their
    track record over time.
    An analyst who reiterated a buy, or upgraded to strong buy for
    Goodyear Tire, Enron, WorldCom,
    or any of the other train wrecks - within 60 days of the crash in
    their share prices, is probably someone
    you want to be a contrarian with.

    At least Goldman didn't upgrade Microsoft to a Strong Buy, meaning
    that Bill Gates was getting ready to dump a huge chunk of his
    holdings, or a mass defection of a major fund.

    Watch for insider trading activity as well. Bill Gates has been known
    to sell as many as 1 million shares a day for a month just before the
    price starts dropping. The price is on the high range, around $30/
    share.
    Since the stock has historically ranged between $24 and $30/share,
    there would need to be a change in fundamentals - new revenue streams,
    a higher than normal increase in revenues, a corporate aquisition, or
    announced intent to pay dividends to make a buy at $30/share credible.

    A buy at $25/share would make good sense.

    At $30/share, if there were one of the factors described above -
    something that would increase revenues, without dipping into cash
    reserves to "stuff the channel", What's "priced in" is profits
    increasing at 10% per year, net profit of 27.51%, and operating margin
    of 36.23%.

    http://finance.google.com/finance?client=ob&q=MSFT

    The numbers for the June quarter look a bit low, and September
    earnings will be announced October 25th.

    If you have a crystal ball, and you can see into the future (without
    speaking to any Microsoft executives), then you can decide whether
    Vista has boosted Microsoft's profits to 35% and operating margins to
    45%, making MSFT a $45/share stock, and buy,

    Or maybe your crystal ball says profits are down to 25% and operating
    margins are down to 32%, making MSFT a $20 stock, in which case you
    might want to sell.

    There seem to be mixed messages coming out of Microsoft prior to the
    quiet period. Dell and HP have indicated that they are selling a lot
    of machines with XP, Microsoft executives claim that this has not
    impacted revenue or unit volumes. This would seem to mean that
    Microsoft expects things to say pretty much the same. They have a
    predictable revenue stream, growth, profits, and margins will likely
    be about the same, and the stock is likely to continue to be worth
    $25-30/share.

    If you have information that you can legally make public that
    indicates otherwise, feel free to do so.

    > Microsoft stands at a major juncture in its lifecycle with Vista and
    > Office 2007 launched but with the future bringing forth changing
    > technology and business models. However, the near-term bull case is
    > compelling.


    Analysts and Investors will probably be looking more carefully at this
    quarter's SEC filing to see where the revenue is coming from. If
    there are shifts away from business revenue, and increases in Vista
    revenue, it could be that Microsoft is playing a shell game, raising
    prices by using it's monopoly power and getting OEMs to pay higher
    prices for equivalent functionality (Vista Business Edition at 20%
    premium to get the same functionality as XP Professional that sold for
    the price of Vista Home Premium).

    On retail shelves, I'm also noticing more and more AMD-64 chip
    machines being sold with Vista Home Premium, which may mean that
    Microsoft plans to collect royalties from Distributors who want to run
    Vista as a virtualized Linux client. Keep in mind that in order to
    get the 64 bit functionality, one has to buy a machine with Vista
    Ultimate. Machines with Ultimate are priced at $200-300 more than
    similar machines with Home Premium, which means that Microsoft may be
    collecting a substantial premium for this offering.

    I've also noticed that more and more Staples, Best Buy, and Office Max
    stores are just not bothering to fill display space with new models of
    PCs. It looks like they are clearing out Vista machines and just
    leaving holes on the shelf. In some cases, the tag even says "Display
    model only".

    Given that this follows the shut-down of CompUSA, PC Warehouse, and
    many Gateway stores, it looks like Vista was not a good thing for
    Retailers. Perhaps Microsoft needs to revise their license terms?

    > Specifically, we expect upside to first-quarter numbers from Halo 3,
    > the aQuantive acquisition closing, currency benefits, and ongoing
    > traction in new-product cycles such as Office 2007


    We will also want to watch for changes in business support contracts.
    Many businesses seem to have shifted away from the "Subscription Plan"
    aka premium support, to either "pay per box" or "standard support"
    with minimal support and costs. This could indicate a corporate shift
    away from automatic upgrades of Office, away from Office entirely, and
    possibly even a transition to Open Office and other Open Document
    based Office Automation software.

    At this point, I will say that I have no insider information and am
    looking only at public statements made by Microsoft and OEMs and
    observations made in various retail outlets in NY,PA, VA, and MD over
    the last 12 months. It seems that the retail market is worse off than
    it was 3 months before Vista was released, and the OEM market seems to
    be less than enthusiastic about Vista as well.

    > On Oct 7, 11:54 am, Rex Ballard wrote:




  14. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2007 19:52:57 -0700, "FrediFizzx" wrote:

    >"Charlie Perrin" wrote:


    >> And Windows XP, the product that refuses to die!


    >I was a Beta tester for XP (and Win98 and some other programs) and it
    >was pretty good out of the gate. A bit bloated over Win 2000 but newer
    >hardware soon took care of that. Worked very well with all my hardware
    >during testing. I couldn't find many bugs at all that weren't already
    >known.


    I found one in the Windows 95 beta that they asked for detailed
    instructions how to duplicate. So from that I would assume that I was
    the first to report it. (In Sim City, click on the mayor's house and
    you'd lock up.)

    >If anyone has doubts about MSFT being a world class
    >organization, they should do some beta testing with them. It was
    >definitely a rewarding experience.


    And to think they were able to send Windows 95 out on floppies. Vista
    comes on a DVD.

    I've got boxes and boxes of floppies thanks to Microsoft.

    I can say one thing, TrueType fonts have worked the same since they
    were originally introduced. My "500 Bitstream fonts for $29" CD that I
    bought in the 3.1 days didn't make Vista blink once.

  15. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    On Oct 10, 8:07 pm, Rex Ballard wrote:

    Thanks Rex Ballard.

    I notice your posts here seem to have a tremendous amount of depth,
    insight and sophistication.

    Either you are an executive, insider or extremely knowledgeable
    techie.

    Or you're just making it up.

    No way of knowing.

    Take care,

    RL


  16. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    On Oct 11, 3:29 am, raylopez99 wrote:
    > On Oct 10, 8:07 pm, Rex Ballard wrote:
    > Thanks Rex Ballard.
    >
    > I notice your posts here seem to have a tremendous amount of depth,
    > insight and sophistication.
    >
    > Either you are an executive, insider or extremely knowledgeable
    > techie.


    I have worked in financial services for over 17 years, including Dow
    Jones, Standard & Poor's, Prudential,
    Met Life, several banks, and several brokerages, some as an employee,
    others as a consultant.

    > Or you're just making it up.


    The fundamental principles of economics are pretty much standard, and
    pretty easily verified.
    Where I openly engage in speculation, I try to use terms to indicate
    that, such as "seems like" or
    "could be", or "estimated at". I have some sources of information,
    including some that are confidential,
    and I read trade journals, web sites, technical, and market trends as
    part of my job.

    > No way of knowing.


    I've posted my URL several times
    http://www.open4success.org

    What's yours?


    > Take care,
    >
    > RL




  17. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    raylopez99 wrote:

    > Why doesn't everybody just buy MSFT (Microsoft) and be done with it!
    > What a powerful company--I'm surprised the stock price isn't higher,
    > but as a long-term shareholder who doesn't plan to sell, I'm not
    > worried.
    >
    > Why don't you join the gravy train? This stock and this company
    > simply cannot be beat.
    >
    > Even their equity investments grow tenfold (Halo developers).


    You'd be much better buying AAPL.

    --

    Immunity is better than innoculation.

    Peter

  18. Re: M$FT--what a powerful company to buy!

    On Oct 5, 10:06 am, raylopez99 wrote:

    John Dvorak's Second Opinion: There's great upside potential for
    Microsoft
    at MarketWatch (Fri 1:00pm)

    JOHN DVORAK'S SECOND OPINION
    Rethinking Microsoft
    Commentary: There's great upside potential for the software giant
    By John C. Dvorak
    Last Update: 1:00 PM ET Oct 12, 2007

    BERKELEY, Calif. (MarketWatch) -- It may be time to rethink our
    attitude toward shares of Microsoft Corp.
    Investors have been overlooking Microsoft (MSFT:30.28, +0.37, +1.2%)
    as a blue-chip investment over the past few years, and the company's
    stock has been moribund compared with the growth a decade ago.
    I say this because investors seem to be ignoring the fact that the
    software giant still dominates a growing sector of the economy -- with
    dominant products including the most successful operating system
    worldwide, as well as the definitive office-productivity applications.
    I'm thinking to myself, 'What would happen if Microsoft actually got
    its act together?'
    In addition, Microsoft may soon become the leader in console gaming, a
    business that until recently has propped up the entire Sony Corp.
    (SNE: empire.
    Then there is the online activity of the Redmond, Wash.-based company,
    with its search engine and portals.
    All these businesses are expanding, despite what appears to be either
    incompetent or perhaps just sloppy marketing and lukewarm customer
    approval.
    I'm thinking to myself, "What would happen if Microsoft actually got
    its act together?" Even more frightening would be the obscure
    possibility that people actually liked Microsoft the way they like
    Apple Inc. (AAPL:then?
    The point is that Microsoft has continued to grow during a period of
    what appears, to me, to be a time of trouble. Here is my short list of
    issues everyone has with Microsoft that has kept the stock from
    performing better:
    The belief that the company cannot sustain growth. It has peaked
    because the computer market has commoditized. But the market worldwide
    is not saturated and the online market is still rapidly growing.
    The belief that Linux or Apple can step in and dominate Microsoft,
    because the newest version of Windows lacks luster and has not been
    well received.
    The operating system and Microsoft Office businesses are dead, as is
    shrink-wrapped software. (I first heard this in 1993 and every year
    since.)
    Microsoft cannot compete with Google Inc. (GOOG:
    626.11, +4.11, +0.7%) online, given its previous inability to compete
    with MSN against AOL.
    The company lost whatever buzz it once had. The flame has gone out.
    Bill Gates is leaving for good, and that's a bad thing.
    Indeed, the bright spots out there for the company are few, or so it
    seems. At a recent Gartner Group meeting, Microsoft Chief Executive
    Steve Ballmer was taken to task by a woman who said she was a "mom"
    who hated Vista, and hated the rigmarole she had to go through for her
    daughter to install Vista then reinstall XP, because Vista was
    crummy.
    This apparently was a highlight of the conference.

    Now, if we look at all the negatives regarding Microsoft, we'll see
    that the company still makes more than $50 billion a year with
    excellent margins and continues to grow at a rate around 13% per
    quarter. What's wrong with this picture?
    You have to conclude that things can only improve for the company.
    Nothing short of a revolutionary version of Linux or a sudden shift to
    the Mac out of the blue will have any impact on the OS business.
    Attempts to dethrone Microsoft Office have gone nowhere.
    Recently, the company may have turned the corner on its most risky
    long-term strategy: the development of the Xbox console, along with an
    online-gaming system that rivals anything else out there.
    Microsoft has long reached critical mass as a blue-chip tech company,
    and has continued to prosper despite itself. All its missteps, botched
    products and strategies were because of internal, not external
    factors.
    It has yet to be beaten at its own game by another player. It gets
    beaten by Google online only because it is in Google's game.
    Because there is so much room for improvement at all levels, there's
    great upside potential for Microsoft.
    The problem is that it is difficult to look objectively at the company
    when you are confronted with its products daily, and they often
    contribute to daily frustration. Everyone is taking it out on the
    stock.


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