Segmentation fault details? - Kernel

This is a discussion on Segmentation fault details? - Kernel ; Hi, all! I'd like to know some details about segmentation fault. What I mean is when a program accesses invalid memory area, it will get a SIGSEGV signal from kernel, and a message "Segmentation fault". I also find that dmesg ...

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Thread: Segmentation fault details?

  1. Segmentation fault details?

    Hi, all!

    I'd like to know some details about segmentation fault.
    What I mean is when a program accesses invalid memory area, it will
    get a SIGSEGV signal from kernel, and a message "Segmentation fault".

    I also find that dmesg can show we something like this:
    ProgramName[Pid]: segfault at xxxx eip xxxx esp xxxx error x
    It is useful and provides the first-step information for further
    debug/analysis.

    My question is how dmesg gets the information, and if there are any
    "decent" way to get this and maybe more information(An "indecent" way
    I came to is grep dmesg)
    so that I can perform some basic auto analysis.

    Thank you.

    Leo
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  2. Re: Segmentation fault details?

    Wang Yi wrote:

    > Hi, all!
    >
    > I'd like to know some details about segmentation fault.
    > What I mean is when a program accesses invalid memory area, it will
    > get a SIGSEGV signal from kernel, and a message "Segmentation fault".
    >
    > I also find that dmesg can show we something like this:
    > ProgramName[Pid]: segfault at xxxx eip xxxx esp xxxx error x
    > It is useful and provides the first-step information for further
    > debug/analysis.
    >
    > My question is how dmesg gets the information, and if there are any
    > "decent" way to get this and maybe more information(An "indecent" way
    > I came to is grep dmesg)
    > so that I can perform some basic auto analysis.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Leo


    Core dumps.

    You might also like to look at Ubuntu's "apport" bug reporting tool. IIRC
    the necessary kernel support is now in mainline. I believe it provides the
    option to dump core by piping it through an arbitrary program. The aim of
    apport is to capture these core dumps, notify the user, and give them the
    option to submit it to the Ubuntu developers.

    One advantage of this pipe technique is that you don't need to search the
    filesystem for core files. (They're dumped in the current directory, but
    you may not know what directory the program was in when it crashed).

    Alan

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  3. Re: Segmentation fault details?

    Wang Yi wrote:

    > Hi, all!
    >
    > *I'd like to know some details about segmentation fault.
    > *What I mean is when a program accesses invalid memory area, it will
    > get a SIGSEGV signal from kernel, and a message "Segmentation fault".
    >
    > *I also find that dmesg can show we something like this:
    > *ProgramName[Pid]: segfault at xxxx eip xxxx esp xxxx error x
    > *It is useful and provides the first-step information for further
    > debug/analysis.
    >
    > *My question is how dmesg gets the information, and if there are any
    > "decent" way to get this and maybe more information(An "indecent" way
    > I came to is grep dmesg)
    > so that I can perform some basic auto analysis.
    >
    > *Thank you.
    >
    > Leo


    Core dumps.

    You might also like to look at Ubuntu's "apport" bug reporting tool. *IIRC
    the necessary kernel support is now in mainline. *I believe it provides the
    option to dump core by piping it through an arbitrary program. *The aim of
    apport is to capture these core dumps, notify the user, and give them the
    option to submit it to the Ubuntu developers.

    One advantage of this last feature is that you don't need to search the
    filesystem for core files. *(They're dumped in the current directory, but
    you may not know what directory the program was in when it crashed).

    Alan

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