Re: Licensed programs - IBM AS400

This is a discussion on Re: Licensed programs - IBM AS400 ; Hi Tom, thanks for the reply. > That's a problem. If the seller doesn't know what he has, it raises the > chance that he's simply reselling the system. Yes, he is reselling, the machine came from a liquidated carpet ...

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Thread: Re: Licensed programs

  1. Re: Licensed programs

    Hi Tom, thanks for the reply.

    > That's a problem. If the seller doesn't know what he has, it raises the
    > chance that he's simply reselling the system.


    Yes, he is reselling, the machine came from a liquidated carpet
    warehouse or something like that. They seem to know something about
    it, just not a password or means of accessing it.

    I think I see what the situation is, I was under the impression that
    if you bought, for example, ILE C, that ILE C could only ever legally
    run on the machine you bought it for, and could not be transferred to
    another machine without clearing it with IBM first.

    >From your explaination it would seem that licenses are seperable from

    machines, so in theory at least, I might be able to find someone
    selling second-user licenses to things like SQL and ILE C?

    Cheers

    Garry


  2. Re: Licensed programs

    thegman wrote:

    >>From your explaination it would seem that licenses are seperable from

    > machines, so in theory at least, I might be able to find someone
    > selling second-user licenses to things like SQL and ILE C?


    Garry:

    Buying an entitlement doesn't include a license key. The license key is
    an encrypted code that's generated based on your system serial number,
    processor group and other details. The only source of the encrypted code
    is the owner of the product definition object (assuming it's protected
    by password, etc., which you can pretty much guarantee is the case for
    IBM LPPs).

    IOW, you can buy an entitlement, but you will have to order the license
    key code from IBM.

    AFAIK, that requires a support agreement. Maybe it doesn't; but
    considering what it can take to get codes out of IBM when you have both
    a maintenance agreement and a purchased entitlement, I wouldn't expect
    it to be easy. If you pay for a software maintenance agreement within a
    month or so of obtaining a system, even used, I _think_ it's a rational
    cost. (Still more than most individuals would pay. Remember that these
    are 'business systems', not designed for personal use.)

    Think in terms of $150/mo. for a 1-year contract, pre-paid. (That's a
    guess, but based on limited experience with agreements of this type.)
    That would be for a basic P05 tier system. The seller will need to
    notify IBM of the transfer of the system serial number to you in a
    timely fashion.

    You might want to get in touch with a Business Partner _before_ buying
    anything in order to get things lined up.

    Again, if anybody else can provide solid info, please feel free to do
    so. You might provide a zip code here so that any BPs can speak up or so
    others can add recommendations for your region.

    --
    Tom Liotta
    http://zap.to/tl400

  3. Re: Licensed programs

    Thanks Tom,
    I think I understand now, I guess it's easier and cheaper just to make
    sure what I need is already installed.

    I know IBM business partners are not set up to deal with enthusiast/
    small time developers like me, so I think I'll keep on checking eBay,
    and see what pops up.

    Cheers

    Garry

    > AFAIK, that requires a support agreement. Maybe it doesn't; but
    > considering what it can take to get codes out of IBM when you have both
    > a maintenance agreement and a purchased entitlement, I wouldn't expect
    > it to be easy. If you pay for a software maintenance agreement within a
    > month or so of obtaining a system, even used, I _think_ it's a rational
    > cost. (Still more than most individuals would pay. Remember that these
    > are 'business systems', not designed for personal use.)
    >
    > Think in terms of $150/mo. for a 1-year contract, pre-paid. (That's a
    > guess, but based on limited experience with agreements of this type.)
    > That would be for a basic P05 tier system. The seller will need to
    > notify IBM of the transfer of the system serial number to you in a
    > timely fashion.
    >
    > You might want to get in touch with a Business Partner _before_ buying
    > anything in order to get things lined up.
    >
    > Again, if anybody else can provide solid info, please feel free to do
    > so. You might provide a zip code here so that any BPs can speak up or so
    > others can add recommendations for your region.
    >
    > --
    > Tom Liottahttp://zap.to/tl400




  4. Re: Licensed programs

    thegman wrote:

    > I know IBM business partners are not set up to deal with enthusiast/
    > small time developers like me, so I think I'll keep on checking eBay,
    > and see what pops up.


    Garry:

    The suggestion to contact a BP wasn't completely from the standpoint of
    purchasing a system from one. Initiate a contact like "I'm thinking of
    buying a used system for learning for possible contract work. Once I buy
    a system, if I need to get additional LPPs or set up maintenance
    contracts, can I call on you to be my BP?"

    Anyone in the BP sales group might talk with you, but you can probably
    find one that's more talkative. While using a BP as a source for LPPs,
    license codes, etc., it part of _their_ business purpose, you (as a
    potential customer) can have some influence in the relationship. They
    can be a useful info source even if no business transaction ever happens.

    Don't drop an opportunity to talk with an experienced rep just because
    you don't think you'll ever hand a check over. You have a right to get
    what you can out of the relationship even if it's only advice.

    In theory, this e-mail address -- express@us.ibm.com -- is supposed to
    be able to supply you with a BP name if you request one. Send your name
    and geographical address there and ask them to give you a contact.

    If you get no response after a week or so, I'll look up the web address
    where I'm near certain you can enter a request and get help from IBM.

    You're best armed when you have info sources. This NG can be very good,
    but _official_ sources can be more useful.

    --
    Tom Liotta
    http://zap.to/tl400

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