Re: iSeries... i5... Java Standards. - IBM AS400

This is a discussion on Re: iSeries... i5... Java Standards. - IBM AS400 ; "Dr.UgoGagliardelli" writes: > Using the ext directory is not forbidden, just for jar, or make an > /home/applications/... Using the ext directory changes the global behaviour of the JVM and I would not recommend it. For developing you may put ...

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Thread: Re: iSeries... i5... Java Standards.

  1. Re: iSeries... i5... Java Standards.

    "Dr.UgoGagliardelli" writes:

    > Using the ext directory is not forbidden, just for jar, or make an
    > /home/applications/...


    Using the ext directory changes the global behaviour of the JVM and I
    would not recommend it.

    For developing you may put it whereever you prefer.

    For deployed code, I would usually put stuff as jar-files in a
    separate directory under a project specific folder. If you can, you
    may want to include the corresponding source code in the jar, as this
    will allow you later to maintain the jar without locating the exact
    source in your source code repository.

    If you have many dependencies (i.e. on jakarta projects) put a copy of
    the jar files along with your own jars, instead of having a global JAR
    repository. This will make your deployments more stable.


    --
    ThorbjÝrn Ravn Andersen

  2. Re: iSeries... i5... Java Standards.

    We do something similar: in the root of the IFS we have 3 directories
    (1 for System Testing, 1 for User Testing, and 1 for Production), and
    within each of those we have 1 directory per application; each
    application directory then has its own subdirectories for Jar files,
    properties files, data files etc.


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