How to kill your VxVM boot ;-) - HP UX

This is a discussion on How to kill your VxVM boot ;-) - HP UX ; Hi, I never liked the complexity of VxVM and the absence of text terminal configuration (in SAM). However I had made an interesting (fatal however) experiment: A VxVM disk group consisting of two 18 GB disks is used for everything ...

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  1. How to kill your VxVM boot ;-)

    Hi,

    I never liked the complexity of VxVM and the absence of text terminal
    configuration (in SAM). However I had made an interesting (fatal however)
    experiment:

    A VxVM disk group consisting of two 18 GB disks is used for everything (also
    booting). While the system was running, I did "dd" both disks to two different
    disks (as a kind of backup). After some time I rebooted. Guess what?

    The system is unable to boot any more, because the system complains about
    "Unable to resolve duplicate diskid".

    An new over-quorum feature: If there are more disks that the system knows
    about, it stops to work. A good chance for a denial of service.

    Long live LVM!

    Regards,
    Ulrich

  2. Re: How to kill your VxVM boot ;-)

    Tell me about it, although I used a different technique
    (replicating volumes across different groups),that
    bastard still looks for old vg halting the boot for
    some 10 seconds- I cannot remove it, because LVM manager
    disables it after failing to find the drive, I cannot
    enable it to remove without first putting the disk back
    in...

    Speaking about computer schizophrenia...

    Rambo

  3. Re: How to kill your VxVM boot ;-)

    On Mar 21, 3:39 am, Ulrich Windl
    wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I never liked the complexity of VxVM and the absence of text terminal
    > configuration (in SAM). However I had made an interesting (fatal however)
    > experiment:
    >
    > A VxVM disk group consisting of two 18 GB disks is used for everything (also
    > booting). While the system was running, I did "dd" both disks to two different
    > disks (as a kind of backup). After some time I rebooted. Guess what?
    >
    > The system is unable to boot any more, because the system complains about
    > "Unable to resolve duplicate diskid".
    >
    > An new over-quorum feature: If there are more disks that the system knows
    > about, it stops to work. A good chance for a denial of service.
    >
    > Long live LVM!
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ulrich


    My first, and thankfully ONLY exposure to this product was actually
    under Digital UNIX. If my memory serves me, it was called LSM
    (Logical Storage Manager) under that platform. I absolutely hated
    it. We had it on a couple of Digital UNIX systems and as I became
    more and more familiar with Digital UNIX, I removed it from any system
    we had it installed on.

    When I saw they were including the base VxVM component on HP-UX, all I
    could say it "you're kidding". LVM is such a superior product (IMO).

    Charles R. Whealton
    Charles Whealton @ pleasedontspam.com


  4. Re: How to kill your VxVM boot ;-)

    On 26 мар, 05:43, "Chuck Whealton" wrote:
    > On Mar 21, 3:39 am, Ulrich Windl
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Hi,

    >
    > > I never liked the complexity of VxVM and the absence of text terminal
    > > configuration (in SAM). However I had made an interesting (fatal however)
    > > experiment:

    IIRC linux LVM won't be happy in this case either..


    > > A VxVM disk group consisting of two 18 GB disks is used for everything (also
    > > booting). While the system was running, I did "dd" both disks to two different
    > > disks (as a kind of backup). After some time I rebooted. Guess what?

    >
    > > The system is unable to boot any more, because the system complains about
    > > "Unable to resolve duplicate diskid".

    >
    > > An new over-quorum feature: If there are more disks that the system knows
    > > about, it stops to work. A good chance for a denial of service.

    >
    > > Long live LVM!

    >
    > > Regards,
    > > Ulrich

    >
    > My first, and thankfully ONLY exposure to this product was actually
    > under Digital UNIX. If my memory serves me, it was called LSM
    > (Logical Storage Manager) under that platform. I absolutely hated
    > it. We had it on a couple of Digital UNIX systems and as I became
    > more and more familiar with Digital UNIX, I removed it from any system
    > we had it installed on.
    >
    > When I saw they were including the base VxVM component on HP-UX, all I
    > could say it "you're kidding". LVM is such a superior product (IMO).
    >
    > Charles R. Whealton
    > Charles Whealton @ pleasedontspam.com




  5. Re: How to kill your VxVM boot ;-)

    Ulrich Windl writes:

    >Hi,


    >I never liked the complexity of VxVM and the absence of text terminal
    >configuration (in SAM). However I had made an interesting (fatal however)
    >experiment:


    >A VxVM disk group consisting of two 18 GB disks is used for everything (also
    >booting). While the system was running, I did "dd" both disks to two different
    >disks (as a kind of backup). After some time I rebooted. Guess what?


    >The system is unable to boot any more, because the system complains about
    >"Unable to resolve duplicate diskid".


    >An new over-quorum feature: If there are more disks that the system knows
    >about, it stops to work. A good chance for a denial of service.



    Worrying about denial of service attacks that require root access is
    rather silly, the number of possible attacks root can perform is
    essentially infinite!

    --
    Douglas Siebert dsiebert@excisethis.khamsin.net

    You're only young once, but you can be immature forever.

  6. Re: How to kill your VxVM boot ;-)

    Douglas Siebert writes:

    [...]
    > Worrying about denial of service attacks that require root access is
    > rather silly, the number of possible attacks root can perform is
    > essentially infinite!


    Think like this: You allow a user to write on a specific disk that you don't
    need. If the user puts the "right data" on it, it can prevent your system from
    booting...

    Regards,
    Ulrich

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