Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators - Hewlett Packard

This is a discussion on Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators - Hewlett Packard ; Hi On 2008-10-22 07:36:05 +1100, "Joel Koltner" said: > > Who do you think they *should* be listening to? This is an easy question to answer: TI and Casio have shown what's the way to go: teachers. What's left of ...

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Thread: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

  1. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    Hi

    On 2008-10-22 07:36:05 +1100, "Joel Koltner"
    said:
    >
    > Who do you think they *should* be listening to?


    This is an easy question to answer: TI and Casio have shown what's the
    way to go:
    teachers.

    What's left of the calculator market is in education. Engineering can
    get much more powerful solution through dedicated device, or simply the
    right software for a PDA


    >
    > I figure the folks at, e.g., HPCC conferences are a representative subset of
    > what people in general want in a calculator... just those who are willing to


    I disagree. They only represent a very tiny market: the calculator
    fanatic and hobbiest.

    > The same people buying the high-end TI and Casio calculators now, I would
    > think? There's plenty to like about TI and Casio calculators, but there's no


    They aren't the same people.
    High-end TI or Casio are entirely focused to work on specific
    curriculum and education.

    Nothing that a 15C, 41C etc could do today.
    HP only has one calculator that is kind of aligned with today's
    educational market: the 39G or 40G.
    I say kind-of because that calculators is now quite old and is in need
    for a serious upgrade and update to match the new curriculum content.

    > fundamental technology they have that HP can't have as well... and HP perhaps
    > still even maintains a better reputation for quality than they do.


    Unfortunately, the days HP was linked to quality are long gone.
    The day they decided to bastardise their product range to compete in
    the consumer range with company like Gateway, Dell, Compaq is the day
    they lost it IMO.

    And worse, they aren't even good at it... I will never recommend a HP
    PC to any of my friend or consider them for work.
    There are better alternatives and cheaper. And their tech support is
    rather poor.

    Mind you, I'm very sadden by this situation ... I do hope that HP
    succeed, but I got a serious reality check .. which seem to be missing
    by many of the posters here.

    --
    They who would give up an essential liberty for temporary security,
    deserve neither liberty or security (Benjamin Franklin)


  2. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    Hi

    On 2008-10-18 21:03:44 +1100, reth said:
    >
    > May I ask who were the people you were listening to before you started
    > the Qonos project?
    >


    That's rather easy to answer: Gerald and myself.

    Then I started to add options that people kept asking for, complexity
    increased, cost increased and it went nowhere.

    --
    They who would give up an essential liberty for temporary security,
    deserve neither liberty or security (Benjamin Franklin)


  3. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    JYA, I fully support your comment : the current market for HP
    calculators is now the 100 or so people following this newsgroup for
    years like me, using HP calculators for 35 years and too old to go
    elsewhere for their daily basic needs. When it is not so basic, I use Excel.

    JYA a écrit :
    > On 2008-10-16 01:37:33 +1100, "Eric Rechlin" said:
    >
    >> HP would like to hear what your favorite vintage
    >> (no-longer-manufactured) HP
    >> calculators are. They have put up a short survey here:
    >>
    >> http://www.zoomerang.com/Survey/?p=WEB228BU68XY93
    >>
    >> Please fill it out and show your support for your favorite "classic" HP
    >> calculators!

    >
    > I really think HP is listening to the wrong people regarding what their
    > next product should be.
    >
    > It seems that the only people they are talking to are people who were HP
    > users back in the 80s through events like the HPCC conference.
    >
    > Sure, HP made some great stuff back then, but really how many people are
    > likely going to buy a revamp of a HP15C, a 41CX other than the 100
    > people following this newsgroup.
    >
    > Yet, everytime I attend the conference that's what the people there will
    > ask for, and unfortunately HP is listening.
    >
    > We be gaining market share that way.
    >
    > Jean-Yves
    >


  4. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    On Oct 22, 5:56 am, JYA wrote:

    > > Who do you think they *should* be listening to?

    >
    > This is an easy question to answer: TI and Casio have shown what's the
    > way to go:
    > teachers.


    Well, then as a teacher, I guess I should speak up.

    I did the survey thing, selecting the 41C as my favorite. But when I
    got to the part where it asked how much I'd pay to buy one, I realized
    that I didn't want to buy one at all. What I really want is for HP to
    learn from their past, but apply it to the future.

    I'd like a modern calculator with modern features (display, memory,
    OS) with some of the positive features that made past ones great
    (tactile feel, reasonable quality, good key layout, easy to read keys
    and display, good documentation, ...). After having used RPL graphing
    calculators for the past 20 years, I really don't want to go back to a
    single line, 4 stack RPN calculator.

    -wes

  5. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    How about Qonos/Xpander/Nspire/Classmate/HP-200LX ?
    OR
    iPaq Phone Edition with slide-in calc keyboard
    EMU48
    +
    RPL/2 & xCas using full RAM & full speed

    "Wes" wrote in message
    news:b69ca224-62d9-42b7-823a-fc61149782d8@p58g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
    > On Oct 22, 5:56 am, JYA wrote:
    >
    >> > Who do you think they *should* be listening to?

    >>
    >> This is an easy question to answer: TI and Casio have shown what's the
    >> way to go:
    >> teachers.

    >
    > Well, then as a teacher, I guess I should speak up.
    >
    > I did the survey thing, selecting the 41C as my favorite. But when I
    > got to the part where it asked how much I'd pay to buy one, I realized
    > that I didn't want to buy one at all. What I really want is for HP to
    > learn from their past, but apply it to the future.
    >
    > I'd like a modern calculator with modern features (display, memory,
    > OS) with some of the positive features that made past ones great
    > (tactile feel, reasonable quality, good key layout, easy to read keys
    > and display, good documentation, ...). After having used RPL graphing
    > calculators for the past 20 years, I really don't want to go back to a
    > single line, 4 stack RPN calculator.
    >
    > -wes




  6. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    Am 22.10.2008, 18:38 Uhr, schrieb Wes :

    > I did the survey thing, selecting the 41C as my favorite. But when I
    > got to the part where it asked how much I'd pay to buy one, I realized
    > that I didn't want to buy one at all. What I really want is for HP to
    > learn from their past, but apply it to the future.
    >
    > I'd like a modern calculator with modern features (display, memory,
    > OS) with some of the positive features that made past ones great
    > (tactile feel, reasonable quality, good key layout, easy to read keys
    > and display, good documentation, ...). After having used RPL graphing
    > calculators for the past 20 years, I really don't want to go back to a
    > single line, 4 stack RPN calculator.


    Right on.

    Martin
    --

  7. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    JYA schrieb:
    > Hi
    >
    > On 2008-10-19 22:59:14 +1100, "Martin Krischik"
    > said:
    >> I disagree here. HP should be trying to find out what they did right
    >> then and why they are not as successful now.

    >
    > The market has changed.
    > People aren't looking for the same products or solutions these days.
    >
    > Who can really believe that resurecting a product that was sold 20 years
    > ago will actually be commercially successful.


    No one. As Wes pointed out we: Take what was good and transport it into
    the current age.

    Example: From a current age HP 16s (the s is not a typo) I would expect
    at least a 32 digit alphanumeric display. And a hundred programming
    steps are not all that hip.

    > Someone mentioned earlier that customers will be will willing to pay
    > twice more for a vintage calculator compare to a new one.
    > Sure, but how many people ?


    I can order a TI 36 thru my company - if I wanted on. But I already got
    one from the last company I worked for. Colleges got them on there desk
    as well. The TI 36 also was constantly improved. So they must sell - and
    the evolutionary improvements TI made won't be so expensive as a
    complete redesign.

    However - as I now knew: The HP 16c is a dam side more helpful to
    computer science.

    I see two other problems:

    1) The HP 16c (as most of the voyager series) has been de-commissioned
    long ago and only the HP 12c went thrue evolutionary improvements. As
    you pointed out: HP would need to redesign them (expensive).

    2) HP is off the scene - at least here in Europe. Go into a "Media
    Markt" or a department store - you get Casio [1] and -maybe- TI. HP - no
    where to see. Want HP? - go to Amanzon or specialist pocket calculator
    mail order companies.

    Martin

    [1] Casio realy has the edge here: "Made in US" - ups what am I talking
    about! All is made in China of course. "Designed in US" / "Designed in
    Japan" is one for us - no national pride comes into play. However HP is
    a well known brand name and could be different in that respect - if only
    they get there act together.
    - --
    Martin Krischik
    krischik@me.com
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  8. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    "JYA" wrote in message
    news:48fe965c$0$6996$426a74cc@news.free.fr...
    > What's left of the calculator market is in education. Engineering can get
    > much more powerful solution through dedicated device, or simply the right
    > software for a PDA


    That's a fair answer, although to really make sense I'd like to see that
    "dedicated device" or "right software for a PDA." I suppose that Qonos was
    targeting that market, to some extent.

    I also don't see that much extra time required (during product development)
    to give the calculator fanatics/hard-core hobbyists something to chew on while
    simultaneously addressing the mass market demands. (And HP has done this with
    the HP 20b, IMO.)

    > And worse, they aren't even good at it... I will never recommend a HP PC to
    > any of my friend or consider them for work.


    I agree about the desktop PCs, although the "business line" HP laptops that
    they obtained from Compaq are still pretty good, IMO.

    ---Joel



  9. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    On Oct 22, 12:38*pm, Wes wrote:
    > On Oct 22, 5:56 am, JYA wrote:
    >
    > > > Who do you think they *should* be listening to?

    >
    > > This is an easy question to answer: TI and Casio have shown what's the
    > > way to go:
    > > teachers.

    >
    > Well, then as a teacher, I guess I should speak up.
    >
    > I did the survey thing, selecting the 41C as my favorite. *But when I
    > got to the part where it asked how much I'd pay to buy one, I realized
    > that I didn't want to buy one at all. *What I really want is for HP to
    > learn from their past, but apply it to the future.
    >
    > I'd like a modern calculator with modern features (display, memory,
    > OS) with some of the positive features that made past ones great
    > (tactile feel, reasonable quality, good key layout, easy to read keys
    > and display, good documentation, ...). *After having used RPL graphing
    > calculators for the past 20 years, I really don't want to go back to a
    > single line, 4 stack RPN calculator.
    >
    > -wes


    I was wondering how difficult it would be to make a calculator
    that had LCD key labels in lieu of printed ones. I have always
    liked USER mode on the HP 48 and 49 series but unless I
    was using a key overlay (HP 48), it proved difficult to remember
    all of the key assignments.

  10. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    paper ink is the key for keys...

    wrote in message
    news:f89dc9b5-5b44-45f8-a374-14e387e1b661@q9g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
    On Oct 22, 12:38 pm, Wes wrote:
    > On Oct 22, 5:56 am, JYA wrote:
    >
    > > > Who do you think they *should* be listening to?

    >
    > > This is an easy question to answer: TI and Casio have shown what's the
    > > way to go:
    > > teachers.

    >
    > Well, then as a teacher, I guess I should speak up.
    >
    > I did the survey thing, selecting the 41C as my favorite. But when I
    > got to the part where it asked how much I'd pay to buy one, I realized
    > that I didn't want to buy one at all. What I really want is for HP to
    > learn from their past, but apply it to the future.
    >
    > I'd like a modern calculator with modern features (display, memory,
    > OS) with some of the positive features that made past ones great
    > (tactile feel, reasonable quality, good key layout, easy to read keys
    > and display, good documentation, ...). After having used RPL graphing
    > calculators for the past 20 years, I really don't want to go back to a
    > single line, 4 stack RPN calculator.
    >
    > -wes


    I was wondering how difficult it would be to make a calculator
    that had LCD key labels in lieu of printed ones. I have always
    liked USER mode on the HP 48 and 49 series but unless I
    was using a key overlay (HP 48), it proved difficult to remember
    all of the key assignments.



  11. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    Hi,

    mnhollinger@yahoo.com schrieb:

    > I was wondering how difficult it would be to make a calculator
    > that had LCD key labels in lieu of printed ones.


    There is an OLED PC Keyboard of offer - if you want all 103 PC keys with
    OLED then it cost >€1000,--.

    http://www.artlebedev.com/everything/optimus/

    Also have a look at there tactus concept:

    http://www.artlebedev.com/everything/optimus-tactus/

    I believe that touch screens have the advantage here. Also see:

    http://uiq3.sourceforge.net/wiki/ind...ctive_keyboard

    I just wonder why I am the only emulator developer who got that space
    saving idea. At least I don't know any other emulator which supports an
    active keyboard.

    Regards

    Martin

    --
    mailto://krischik@users.sourceforge.net
    Ada programming at: http://ada.krischik.com

  12. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    On Oct 24, 1:50*am, Martin Krischik
    wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > mnhollin...@yahoo.com schrieb:
    >
    > > I was wondering how difficult it would be to make a calculator
    > > that had LCD key labels in lieu of printed ones.

    >
    > There is an OLED PC Keyboard of offer - if you want all 103 PC keys with
    > OLED then it cost >€1000,--.
    >
    > http://www.artlebedev.com/everything/optimus/
    >
    > Also have a look at there tactus concept:
    >
    > http://www.artlebedev.com/everything/optimus-tactus/
    >
    > I believe that touch screens have the advantage here. Also see:
    >
    > http://uiq3.sourceforge.net/wiki/ind...2P/QVGA#active...
    >
    > I just wonder why I am the only emulator developer who got that space
    > saving idea. At least I don't know any other emulator which supports an
    > active keyboard.
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Martin
    >
    > --
    > mailto://krisc...@users.sourceforge.net
    > Ada programming at:http://ada.krischik.com


    Martin,

    I really like the Optimus Tactus keyboard! I think it is an
    excellent idea because a person could utilize the same
    keyboard for a broad range of applications. Also, since
    we all have different size fingers and hand spans, it
    would be ergonomically sound. Concerning calculator
    applications, such a keyboard might not be practical
    for industrial or outdoor use where gloves might be
    used.

    Cheers,

    Mark

  13. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    On Oct 24, 1:50*am, Martin Krischik
    wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > mnhollin...@yahoo.com schrieb:
    >
    > > I was wondering how difficult it would be to make a calculator
    > > that had LCD key labels in lieu of printed ones.

    >
    > There is an OLED PC Keyboard of offer - if you want all 103 PC keys with
    > OLED then it cost >€1000,--.
    >
    > http://www.artlebedev.com/everything/optimus/
    >
    > Also have a look at there tactus concept:
    >
    > http://www.artlebedev.com/everything/optimus-tactus/
    >
    > I believe that touch screens have the advantage here. Also see:
    >
    > http://uiq3.sourceforge.net/wiki/ind...2P/QVGA#active...
    >
    > I just wonder why I am the only emulator developer who got that space
    > saving idea. At least I don't know any other emulator which supports an
    > active keyboard.
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Martin
    >
    > --
    > mailto://krisc...@users.sourceforge.net
    > Ada programming at:http://ada.krischik.com


    P.S. I am just beginning to learn Java. I have the
    NetBeans 6.1 on my PC. Should I be using
    Java ME if I want to write applications for
    mobile devices?

  14. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    On Oct 24, 5:50*am, mnhollin...@yahoo.com wrote:
    > On Oct 24, 1:50*am, Martin Krischik
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Hi,

    >
    > > mnhollin...@yahoo.com schrieb:

    >
    > > > I was wondering how difficult it would be to make a calculator
    > > > that had LCD key labels in lieu of printed ones.

    >
    > > There is an OLED PC Keyboard of offer - if you want all 103 PC keys with
    > > OLED then it cost >€1000,--.

    >
    > >http://www.artlebedev.com/everything/optimus/

    >
    > > Also have a look at there tactus concept:

    >
    > >http://www.artlebedev.com/everything/optimus-tactus/

    >
    > > I believe that touch screens have the advantage here. Also see:

    >
    > >http://uiq3.sourceforge.net/wiki/ind...2P/QVGA#active...

    >
    > > I just wonder why I am the only emulator developer who got that space
    > > saving idea. At least I don't know any other emulator which supports an
    > > active keyboard.

    >
    > > Regards

    >
    > > Martin

    >
    > > --
    > > mailto://krisc...@users.sourceforge.net
    > > Ada programming at:http://ada.krischik.com

    >
    > Martin,
    >
    > I really like the Optimus Tactus keyboard! I think it is an
    > excellent idea because a person could utilize the same
    > keyboard for a broad range of applications. Also, since
    > we all have different size fingers and hand spans, it
    > would be ergonomically sound. Concerning calculator
    > applications, such a keyboard might not be practical
    > for industrial or outdoor use where gloves might be
    > used.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Mark- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    P.S. I am just beginning to learn Java. I have
    NetBeans 6.1 on my PC. Should I be using
    Java ME if I want to write applications for
    mobile devices?

  15. JavaME [Was: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators]

    Am 24.10.2008, 12:09 Uhr, schrieb :

    > P.S. I am just beginning to learn Java. I have the
    > NetBeans 6.1 on my PC. Should I be using
    > Java ME if I want to write applications for
    > mobile devices?


    Well, you could read my rationale why I used JavaME:

    http://uiq3.sourceforge.net/wiki/ind...FX-602P/JavaME

    My main rationale are the short product cycles - especialy with
    Smartphones. You are likely to replace the device every 2 to 4 years and
    you want to take your home made applications with you.

    Another helpfull thing is the ability to create dual platform systems.
    Debugging on mobile devices is a pain in the bud. In the end it was easier
    to create a normal desktop version of the FX-602P Simulator, do debugging
    there and then just create the mobile version on the side line. See:

    http://uiq3.sourceforge.net/wiki/ind...ce/FX-602P/MVC

    And since this is the forum for calculator fanatics you should also read:

    http://uiq3.sourceforge.net/wiki/ind...etic_Libraries

    Regards

    Martin

    --
    Martin Krischik

  16. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    Why didn't you just sell the R&D to HP and they could have produced and
    branded it and a lot Engineer types would have found themselves in a happy
    state of nerd-varna? What I was expecting pay for a new Qonos would be
    about what I paid for my HP 48SX with a RAM and a ROM card a number of years
    ago, which was about the same as what the first 35's were going for; in 1973
    dollars even!

    - Greg S.



    "JYA" wrote in message
    news:48fe96ad$0$6996$426a74cc@news.free.fr...
    > Hi
    >
    > On 2008-10-18 21:03:44 +1100, reth said:
    > >
    > > May I ask who were the people you were listening to before you started
    > > the Qonos project?
    > >

    >
    > That's rather easy to answer: Gerald and myself.
    >
    > Then I started to add options that people kept asking for, complexity
    > increased, cost increased and it went nowhere.
    >
    > --
    > They who would give up an essential liberty for temporary security,
    > deserve neither liberty or security (Benjamin Franklin)
    >




  17. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    On Oct 23, 11:00*am, "Joel Koltner"
    wrote:
    > "JYA" wrote in message
    >
    > news:48fe965c$0$6996$426a74cc@news.free.fr...
    >
    > > What's left of the calculator market is in education. Engineering can get
    > > much more powerful solution through dedicated device, or simply the right
    > > software for a PDA

    [...]
    > I also don't see that much extra time required (during product development)
    > to give the calculator fanatics/hard-core hobbyists something to chew on while
    > simultaneously addressing the mass market demands. *(And HP has done this with
    > the HP 20b, IMO.)
    >
    > > And worse, they aren't even good at it... I will never recommend a HP PC to
    > > any of my friend or consider them for work.


    HP essentially gave the lead in the calculator market to TI when they
    walked away from it. That was when Carly Fiorina stood up and
    announced that they were discontinuing the calculator product line
    because it was, in her words, "not profitable." Well, first she was
    wrong, second she was shortsighted, and third she didn't understand
    calculators.

    She was wrong because the calculator product line was holding its own,
    paying the bills and consistently showing a profit, in spite of
    horrendous corporate cost-cutting. However, its profit was such a
    miniscule fraction of corporate profits that it got lost on the pie
    chart. (And it paled in comparison to the other product made in
    Corvallis: inkjet printheads.) If she was wrong and knew it, then
    she was lying.

    She was shortsighted because people who bought HP calculators and
    liked them tended to buy other HP stuff: computers, printers,
    servers, scopes, logic analyzers, frequency counters, power supplies,
    signal generators, spectrum analyzers -- can I stop now? It wouldn't
    have mattered if HP lost $195 on every scientific calculator they
    sold: their profit on a computer or an instrument was many times
    $195. Carly and her minions didn't know how to (or simply chose not
    to) calculate the goodwill generated by those calculators and
    translate that goodwill into future earnings. By walking away from
    calculators, she caused HP to lose untold thousands of dollars of
    profit from bigger-ticket items.

    She didn't understand calculators because she was an idiot -- no,
    sorry, let me try them again. She simply didn't understand
    calculators and therefore, to her they were useless. Somebody told
    her that "one day PDAs will replace calculators," and because she
    didn't understand calculators, she believed them. And then she made
    the prophecy come true.

    As a result, the group of wizards and geniuses that were responsible
    for HP's long and successful calculator line was disbanded, and its
    members have long gone their separate ways. TI rushed in to fill the
    vacuum. Post-Carly HP realized their mistake and tried to fix things,
    but they have never been serious enough about it to get anywhere.
    HP's calculator marketing post-Carly has been either nonexistent or
    simply embarrassing. The quality of the designs that have come out of
    Taiwan have been uniformly horrible (except for the 35S), and the
    quality of the construction (including the 35S) has been uniformly bad
    -- not even as good as TI.

    As someone else said, teachers know what's going on. The AP Calculus
    teacher at our local high school used to say "If you're using an HP48,
    I can help you; if not, you're on your own." Now that same teacher
    says "If you're using a TI-84/86/89, I can help you; if not, you're on
    your own." She'd go back to the HP product line in a minute if HP
    could match what TI has done to win the hearts and minds of America's
    teachers -- and from there, America's students and parents.

    --
    Regards
    Ray

  18. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    On Oct 15, 9:37*am, tiwag wrote:
    > 1. HP48GX
    > 2. HP41CX


    Interesting. I took the survey, and I reversed the order. 41CX
    first, 48GX second.

    The survey was, um, poorly designed. HP already knows what they want
    to do, and so they fixed the survey so that the results will be biased
    to support their decision. It looks to me like they're still not
    serious about calculators.

  19. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    On Oct 15, 7:37*am, "Eric Rechlin" wrote:
    > HP would like to hear what your favorite vintage (no-longer-manufactured)HP
    > calculators are. *They have put up a short survey here:
    >
    > http://www.zoomerang.com/Survey/?p=WEB228BU68XY93
    >
    > Please fill it out and show your support for your favorite "classic" HP
    > calculators!
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Eric Rechlin


    Eric, do you know if HP is interested in as many people as possible
    taking the survey, or just the calc groupies associated with
    comp.sys.hp48, MoHPC, and their own forum?

    In other words, why is the survey not more widely distributed over the
    internets (slahsdot, digg, thinkgeek, wired, et al.)? Only ~800 people
    have taken the survey so far! Is this what HP wants, or should the
    survey be distributed as widely as possible to accumulate as much data
    as possible?

    Is JYA right? Are they only listening to a small sample?

    I am not impressed with the low turnout. I do not know if people were
    encouraged to "pass it along". I wasn't. Did HP send the survey to any
    other popular tech sites? I do not even see the survey mentioned on
    "hp.com/calculators".

    Cheers,
    PG

  20. Re: Survey on favorite vintage HP calculators

    wrote:
    > Eric, do you know if HP is interested in as many people as possible
    > taking the survey, or just the calc groupies associated with
    > comp.sys.hp48, MoHPC, and their own forum?


    I do not know.

    > I do not even see the survey mentioned on "hp.com/calculators".


    I believe they mentioned it to anyone who called the calculator technical
    support line, but I don't think there was any other publicity from HP of the
    survey. To my knowledge, the only other publicity at all was my post to
    this newsgroup, the link on my site, and a post to the HP Museum forum.

    HP has told me that the survey will be closed now, after being up for a
    month, so I have now removed the link from my site. Presumably they
    received the answers they were looking for.

    Regards,

    Eric Rechlin



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