Re: OT: Were does the electricity come from? (Walter Levin) - Hewlett Packard

This is a discussion on Re: OT: Were does the electricity come from? (Walter Levin) - Hewlett Packard ; Mark Wonsil writes: > Of course one has to ask, "Can we produce a constant current in this > method?" > > I don't think so. However, the idea of generating electricity by moving > water is not impossible. Some ...

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Thread: Re: OT: Were does the electricity come from? (Walter Levin)

  1. Re: OT: Were does the electricity come from? (Walter Levin)

    Mark Wonsil writes:

    > Of course one has to ask, "Can we produce a constant current in this
    > method?"
    >
    > I don't think so. However, the idea of generating electricity by moving
    > water is not impossible. Some think that by pushing water through really
    > small tubes they can produce enough electricity to someday power small
    > electronics.
    >
    > http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/18446


    On the other hand, you can produce a great deal more constant current by
    pushing water through really large tubes:

    http://www.usbr.gov/power/data/sites...y/glencnyn.jpg

    Wirt Atmar

    * To join/leave the list, search archives, change list settings, *
    * etc., please visit http://raven.utc.edu/archives/hp3000-l.html *


  2. Re: OT: Were does the electricity come from? (Walter Levin)

    Those of you that may remember your college chemistry or physics labs
    (my recollections always tend to morph into something else) may recall
    using the momentum of running water to create a vacuum in an attached
    secondary tube. Perhaps our friend Wirt can explain?

    -----Original Message-----
    From: HP-3000 Systems Discussion [mailto:HP3000-L@RAVEN.UTC.EDU] On
    Behalf Of Wirt Atmar
    Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 10:05 AM
    To: HP3000-L@RAVEN.UTC.EDU
    Subject: Re: [HP3000-L] OT: Were does the electricity come from? (Walter
    Levin)

    Mark Wonsil writes:

    > Of course one has to ask, "Can we produce a constant current in this
    > method?"
    >
    > I don't think so. However, the idea of generating electricity by

    moving
    > water is not impossible. Some think that by pushing water through

    really
    > small tubes they can produce enough electricity to someday power small


    > electronics.
    >
    > http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/18446


    On the other hand, you can produce a great deal more constant current by

    pushing water through really large tubes:

    http://www.usbr.gov/power/data/sites...y/glencnyn.jpg

    Wirt Atmar

    * To join/leave the list, search archives, change list settings, *
    * etc., please visit http://raven.utc.edu/archives/hp3000-l.html *

    * To join/leave the list, search archives, change list settings, *
    * etc., please visit http://raven.utc.edu/archives/hp3000-l.html *


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