Programming - Hewlett Packard

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Thread: Programming

  1. Programming

    Finally have time to really learn my calculators. I want to learn to
    program them since one of them is always with me and my computer is
    not. I want to program for the math problems in some of the math
    problem books. I don't know weather to use sys RPL, user RPL, or
    C on the computer and transfer over to calculator. I intend to
    learn the HP-50 and the HP-35s. Thanks for your time and efforts.

    Don

  2. Re: Programming

    On Dec 1, 8:06 pm, Don wrote:
    > Finally have time to really learn my calculators. I want to learn to
    > program them since one of them is always with me and my computer is
    > not. I want to program for the math problems in some of the math
    > problem books. I don't know weather to use sys RPL, user RPL, or
    > C on the computer and transfer over to calculator. I intend to
    > learn the HP-50 and the HP-35s. Thanks for your time and efforts.
    >
    > Don


    I would start by using user RPL and see if that meets your needs. Why
    don't you download the HP-50 manual and look at the vast set of
    commands available to you. You can do a lot with the user RPL so
    don't be too anxious to learn sys RPL or assembly language and take
    your precious time away from your math problems.

  3. Re: Programming

    On Dec 1, 10:56 pm, mnhollin...@yahoo.com wrote:
    > On Dec 1, 8:06 pm, Don wrote:
    >
    > > Finally have time to really learn my calculators. I want to learn to
    > > program them since one of them is always with me and my computer is
    > > not. I want to program for the math problems in some of the math
    > > problem books. I don't know weather to use sys RPL, user RPL, or
    > > C on the computer and transfer over to calculator. I intend to
    > > learn the HP-50 and the HP-35s. Thanks for your time and efforts.

    >
    > > Don

    >
    > I would start by using user RPL and see if that meets your needs. Why
    > don't you download the HP-50 manual and look at the vast set of
    > commands available to you. You can do a lot with the user RPL so
    > don't be too anxious to learn sys RPL or assembly language and take
    > your precious time away from your math problems.


    I absolutely agree about UserRPL as a starting point; I never use
    SysRPL for the math stuff I do, which involves a lot of 3D vector
    calculus, Gaussian beam propagation, some lens design... but mainly
    it's a diverse and changing set. If I really needed to do lens design
    on the HP50, could I write a ray-tracer in SysRPL that would run
    faster than the one in UserRPL? Well, it would take a significant
    amount of learning to get facile in SysRPL, and since the underlying
    operations (square roots, trig functions) are already time-intensive
    and exist in "native mode" (imprecise term, sorry), the basic
    calculations would not be much faster. On the other hand, if you
    wanted to write an efficient function to generate, say, the plasma
    dispersion function from series approximations, where the basic
    operations are 4-function but there are a lot of them, then it would
    be a lot faster in SysRPL, I think.
    But learn the UserRPL first! Until you can use that effortlessly you
    won't really know whether SysRPL is needed...unless you're just
    looking for an excuse to learn a (nother) cool programming language,
    in which case I'm discussing the wrong subject!
    --Irl

  4. Re: Programming

    On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 04:10:57 -0800 (PST), Irl
    wrote:

    >On Dec 1, 10:56 pm, mnhollin...@yahoo.com wrote:
    >> On Dec 1, 8:06 pm, Don wrote:
    >>
    >> > Finally have time to really learn my calculators. I want to learn to
    >> > program them since one of them is always with me and my computer is
    >> > not. I want to program for the math problems in some of the math
    >> > problem books. I don't know weather to use sys RPL, user RPL, or
    >> > C on the computer and transfer over to calculator. I intend to
    >> > learn the HP-50 and the HP-35s. Thanks for your time and efforts.

    >>
    >> > Don

    >>
    >> I would start by using user RPL and see if that meets your needs. Why
    >> don't you download the HP-50 manual and look at the vast set of
    >> commands available to you. You can do a lot with the user RPL so
    >> don't be too anxious to learn sys RPL or assembly language and take
    >> your precious time away from your math problems.

    >
    >I absolutely agree about UserRPL as a starting point; I never use
    >SysRPL for the math stuff I do, which involves a lot of 3D vector
    >calculus, Gaussian beam propagation, some lens design... but mainly
    >it's a diverse and changing set. If I really needed to do lens design
    >on the HP50, could I write a ray-tracer in SysRPL that would run
    >faster than the one in UserRPL? Well, it would take a significant
    >amount of learning to get facile in SysRPL, and since the underlying
    >operations (square roots, trig functions) are already time-intensive
    >and exist in "native mode" (imprecise term, sorry), the basic
    >calculations would not be much faster. On the other hand, if you
    >wanted to write an efficient function to generate, say, the plasma
    >dispersion function from series approximations, where the basic
    >operations are 4-function but there are a lot of them, then it would
    >be a lot faster in SysRPL, I think.
    >But learn the UserRPL first! Until you can use that effortlessly you
    >won't really know whether SysRPL is needed...unless you're just
    >looking for an excuse to learn a (nother) cool programming language,
    >in which case I'm discussing the wrong subject!
    >--Irl

    Thank you for your responses. I am not trying to re-invent the wheel,
    just have fun. I also like to try to keep up with conversations in
    this news group, but it seems like some go a whole lot deeper than
    user RPL and that was why I posed the question. Thanks again.

    Don

  5. Re: Programming

    In article ,
    Don wrote:

    > Thank you for your responses. I am not trying to re-invent the wheel,
    > just have fun.


    Reinventing the wheel and having fun are not mutually exclusive. It
    can be a lot of fun to reinvent some wheel somewhere - and it can be
    quite educational too! So reinventing some wheel is OK, as long as
    you know what you're doing.

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    Paul Schlyter, Grev Turegatan 40, SE-114 38 Stockholm, SWEDEN
    e-mail: pausch at stockholm dot bostream dot se
    WWW: http://stjarnhimlen.se/

  6. Re: Programming

    On Mon, 03 Dec 2007 07:43:43 GMT, pausch@saaf.se (Paul Schlyter)
    wrote:

    >In article ,
    >Don wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you for your responses. I am not trying to re-invent the wheel,
    >> just have fun.

    >
    >Reinventing the wheel and having fun are not mutually exclusive. It
    >can be a lot of fun to reinvent some wheel somewhere - and it can be
    >quite educational too! So reinventing some wheel is OK, as long as
    >you know what you're doing.


    Never thought of it in that context. Thanks for the enlightenment
    and have a great day.

    Don

  7. Re: Programming


    "Irl" wrote in message
    news:14d6cca0-37e0-4323-97d9-6aa7c3468f38@s8g2000prg.googlegroups.com...
    > On Dec 1, 10:56 pm, mnhollin...@yahoo.com wrote:
    >> On Dec 1, 8:06 pm, Don wrote:
    >>
    >> > Finally have time to really learn my calculators. I want to learn to
    >> > program them since one of them is always with me and my computer is
    >> > not. I want to program for the math problems in some of the math
    >> > problem books. I don't know weather to use sys RPL, user RPL, or
    >> > C on the computer and transfer over to calculator. I intend to
    >> > learn the HP-50 and the HP-35s. Thanks for your time and efforts.

    >>
    >> > Don

    >
    > On the other hand, if you
    > wanted to write an efficient function to generate, say, the plasma
    > dispersion function from series approximations, where the basic
    > operations are 4-function but there are a lot of them, then it would
    > be a lot faster in SysRPL, I think.


    C a lot faster in C



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