The HP 35S has arrived... - Hewlett Packard

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  1. The HP 35S has arrived...

    The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has arrived:
    http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html

    and it looks supurb!

    Dave.


  2. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    On May 29, 8:19 am, "altz...@gmail.com" wrote:
    > The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has arrived:http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html
    >
    > and it looks supurb!
    >
    > Dave.


    I double that! Big enter key and that classic look!
    I'm getting 2 asap
    reth


  3. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    Are these available anywhere in the US yet? Anyone know how much they'll be?

    > On May 29, 8:19 am, "altz...@gmail.com" wrote:
    >
    >> The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has
    >> arrived:http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html
    >>
    >> and it looks supurb!
    >>
    >> Dave.
    >>

    > I double that! Big enter key and that classic look!
    > I'm getting 2 asap
    > reth




  4. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...


    altzone@gmail.com ha scritto:

    > The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has arrived:
    > http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html
    >
    > and it looks supurb!
    >
    > Dave.

    Hi there.
    You may want to have a look at the comments and enthusiasm this thread
    on the HP Museum forum shows:

    http://www.hpmuseum.org/cgi-sys/cgiw...=114716#114716

    I think it was a sign of maturity and customer-satisfaction-thinking
    by HP to seem to have listened to many of the wishes of its most
    faithful users.
    Today there should be an official presentation in Monaco (France)
    starting from today till June, 1st
    Best regards.
    Giancarlo


  5. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    The French part of the SMS's website is claiming availability in
    Summer 2007 (and July '07 for the HP10S).
    Regards
    Vincent



  6. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    Giancarlo ha scritto:
    > altzone@gmail.com ha scritto:
    >
    >> The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has arrived:
    >> http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html
    >>
    >> and it looks supurb!
    >>
    >> Dave.

    > Hi there.
    > You may want to have a look at the comments and enthusiasm this thread
    > on the HP Museum forum shows:
    >
    > http://www.hpmuseum.org/cgi-sys/cgiw...=114716#114716
    >
    > I think it was a sign of maturity and customer-satisfaction-thinking
    > by HP to seem to have listened to many of the wishes of its most
    > faithful users.
    > Today there should be an official presentation in Monaco (France)
    > starting from today till June, 1st
    > Best regards.
    > Giancarlo
    >


    As I've already posted on MoHPC Forum, I plan to buy 2.

    And ...finalmente sei arrivata!

    I hope you will satisfy us all!

    -- Antonio

  7. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    "reth" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:1180411338.411966.86890@o11g2000prd.googlegro ups.com...
    > On May 29, 8:19 am, "altz...@gmail.com" wrote:
    >> The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has
    >> arrived:http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html
    >>
    >> and it looks supurb!
    >>
    >> Dave.

    >
    > I double that! Big enter key and that classic look!
    > I'm getting 2 asap
    > reth
    >

    If the 35s is real, it'll be the 2nd remarkable machine from the new 'hp',
    after the 12c Anniversary Edition.

    At least it looks very promising, modern retro style
    with ENTER bar and arithmetic keys where they belong,
    and a more mature color schema:-)

    It think I'll buy two, too.

    Raymond



  8. Re: The HP 35S has arrived... (OT)

    Antonio,

    It seems to me that you like very much to answer just after me on
    every HP forum out there! ;-)

    Best Regards
    Vincent



  9. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    Does anyone know if the 35s keyboard is like the 41cv? It looks similar.
    Anyone know the price yet? What the heck I'll buy one anyway.

    Dave

    wrote in message
    news:1180390796.945800.239040@i13g2000prf.googlegr oups.com...
    > The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has arrived:
    > http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html
    >
    > and it looks supurb!
    >
    > Dave.
    >




  10. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    On 29 Mag, 12:07, "David" wrote:
    > Does anyone know if the 35s keyboard is like the 41cv? It looks similar.
    > Anyone know the price yet? What the heck I'll buy one anyway.
    >
    > Dave
    >
    > wrote in message
    >
    > news:1180390796.945800.239040@i13g2000prf.googlegr oups.com...
    >
    > > The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has arrived:
    > >http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html

    >
    > > and it looks supurb!

    >
    > > Dave.


    Hi Dave.
    As far as I was able to understand from the huge rumours the event
    caused ;-), it seems that the keys shaping (with slanted faces) and
    the colour mapping recall the 41's.
    I expect the functions to be quite different, eben if indirect
    addressing could be supported....
    As far as the price goes, I expect it to be not much higher than the
    33s one - my guess? Between 50 and 65 USD.
    Best regards.
    Giancarlo


  11. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    It looks good. I will get one. It only lacks one big thing: I/O. How
    soon will we see a USB or serial port hacked in?


  12. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    Thanks for the reply. I hope HP will issue more detailed information soon on
    the built-in functions and whether indirect addressing will be included.


    "Giancarlo" wrote in message
    news:1180434260.212800.324120@q69g2000hsb.googlegr oups.com...
    > On 29 Mag, 12:07, "David" wrote:
    >> Does anyone know if the 35s keyboard is like the 41cv? It looks similar.
    >> Anyone know the price yet? What the heck I'll buy one anyway.
    >>
    >> Dave
    >>
    >> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:1180390796.945800.239040@i13g2000prf.googlegr oups.com...
    >>
    >> > The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has arrived:
    >> >http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html

    >>
    >> > and it looks supurb!

    >>
    >> > Dave.

    >
    > Hi Dave.
    > As far as I was able to understand from the huge rumours the event
    > caused ;-), it seems that the keys shaping (with slanted faces) and
    > the colour mapping recall the 41's.
    > I expect the functions to be quite different, eben if indirect
    > addressing could be supported....
    > As far as the price goes, I expect it to be not much higher than the
    > 33s one - my guess? Between 50 and 65 USD.
    > Best regards.
    > Giancarlo
    >




  13. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    altzone@gmail.com wrote <1180390796.945800.239040@i13g2000prf.googlegroups. com> in comp.sys.hp48:
    > The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has arrived:
    > http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html
    >
    > and it looks supurb!


    It looks a lot better than I expected, but they still had to spoil it
    with those ugly cursor keys. :-(

    --
    Wayne Brown (HPCC #1104)

    s ofereode, isses swa mg. ("That passed away, this also can.")
    from "Deor," in the Exeter Book (folios 100r-100v)

  14. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    On 29 mayo, 00:19, "altz...@gmail.com" wrote:
    > The new HP35S (the HP 35 35th anniversary model) has arrived:http://www.calculators-hp.com/35s.html
    >
    > and it looks supurb!
    >
    > Dave.


    And what about the hp10s?:
    http://www.calculators-hp.com/10s.html

    A solar cell calc from HP ;-)


  15. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    On 29 Mag, 13:03, ppeb wrote:
    > It looks good. I will get one. It only lacks one big thing: I/O. How
    > soon will we see a USB or serial port hacked in?


    Hi.
    I think that providing some I/O would prevent the calc from being
    accepted in many tests and exams, so maybe HP wouldn't run the risk of
    loosing a slice of the market...
    Just a thought.
    Best regards.
    Giancarlo


  16. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    [looking back into history, having collected enough truly fine calcs
    for my tomb, for reliable navigation in the after-life :]

    On Tue, 29 May 2007 03:25:03 -0500, Raymond Del Tondo wrote:

    > At least it looks very promising, modern retro style
    > with ENTER bar and arithmetic keys where they belong.


    I suppose by "arithmetic keys where they belong,"
    you mean one row lower down, rather than above ENTER ?

    There was very good reason for the original HP35's
    arithmetic key placement, however, which was on the
    left, with [+] and[*] adjacent in the middle
    of the grouping, but that has long been forgotten.

    http://www.hpmuseum.org/four35s.jpg

    Since those days, HP added its now-expected extra lower-left
    shift keys and ON/C, moved arithmetic keys to the right side,
    and adopted the same sequence of [+] [-][*] [/]
    that the "four-banger" industry made everyone expect
    (the present-day item is also one column wider,
    very beneficially).

    My accountant friends, who "speed typed" on their old
    adding machines, would have appreciated the thoughtful
    "human engineering" considerations of industrial designer
    Ed Liljenwall -- "We spent as much time on the keyboard layout,
    on the choice of functions, and on the styling
    as we did on the electronics" -- but usage has changed,
    and so has design.

    The following quotes are from hpmuseum.org:

    "The HP-35 and probably the entire
    HP pocket calculator product line
    was the sole result of a visionary CEO
    who chose to ignore the market studies
    and produce what he felt that engineers would want.
    His view of the market was that if the engineer at the next bench
    liked it and thought it would make his job easier,
    then it was worth doing. The HP-35 was developed in two years,
    at a cost of approximately one million dollars with twenty engineers.
    At the time, three to five years was a typical HP development cycle."

    "HP originally developed the HP-35 for internal use
    and then decided to try selling it."
    [when has that ever happened in more modern times?]

    "Hewlett-Packard Integrity...
    The HP-35 had numerical algorithms that exceeded the precision
    of most mainframe computers at the time. During development,
    Dave Cochran, who was in charge of the algorithms,
    tried to use a Burroughs B5500 to validate the results of the HP-35
    but instead found too little precision in the former to continue.
    IBM mainframes also didn't measure up. This forced time-consuming
    manual comparisons of results to mathematical tables. A few bugs
    got through this process. For example: 2.02 ln e^x resulted in 2
    rather than 2.02. When the bug was discovered, HP had already sold
    25,000 units which was a huge volume for the company. In a meeting,
    Dave Packard asked what they were going to do about the units
    already in the field and someone in the crowd said 'Don't tell?'
    At this Packard's pencil snapped and he said: 'Who said that?
    We're going to tell everyone, and offer them a replacement.
    It would be better to never make a dime of profit
    than to have a product out there with a problem.'"

    Also not in more modern times.

    "The HP-35, like all the hand-held HPs that followed,
    was required to remain undamaged after falling three feet
    onto concrete on each of its corners."

    Yeah, that's the one I want in my casket,
    to survive the final six-foot drop

    Off[xx ]On

  17. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    On Tue, 29 May 2007 06:57:25 -0500, jsmanrique
    [author of "Utilidades Electrotecnia 1.2"] wrote:

    > And what about the hp10s?:
    > http://www.calculators-hp.com/10s.html
    > A solar cell calc from HP ;-)


    Originally from Casio, more recently via China.

    But even HP35s sports <-ENG and ENG->

    http://www.hpcalc.org/search.php?query=manrique

  18. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    On May 29, 10:24 pm, "John H Meyers" wrote:
    > [looking back into history, having collected enough truly fine calcs
    > for my tomb, for reliable navigation in the after-life :]
    >
    > On Tue, 29 May 2007 03:25:03 -0500, Raymond Del Tondo wrote:
    > > At least it looks very promising, modern retro style
    > > with ENTER bar and arithmetic keys where they belong.

    >
    > I suppose by "arithmetic keys where they belong,"
    > you mean one row lower down, rather than above ENTER ?
    >
    > There was very good reason for the original HP35's
    > arithmetic key placement, however, which was on the
    > left, with [+] and[*] adjacent in the middle
    > of the grouping, but that has long been forgotten.


    And what were those good reasons?

    Being a right hander I find having the last key I usually press (the
    arithmetic keys) on the left hand side very inefficient, as I have to
    move my hand to the left side, press the key and then bring my hand
    all the way back over to the naturally resting right side again.
    That's poor layout in my book. Having the arithmetic keys on the right
    side is more natural and efficient IMHO.

    Dave.


  19. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    On May 29, 10:37 pm, "John H Meyers" wrote:
    > On Tue, 29 May 2007 06:57:25 -0500, jsmanrique
    > [author of "Utilidades Electrotecnia 1.2"] wrote:
    >
    > > And what about the hp10s?:
    > >http://www.calculators-hp.com/10s.html
    > > A solar cell calc from HP ;-)

    >
    > Originally from Casio, more recently via China.
    >
    > But even HP35s sports <-ENG and ENG->


    and thank goodness for that!

    Dave.


  20. Re: The HP 35S has arrived...

    [expanded -- first "send" might have got lost, anyway]

    JHM:

    > There was very good reason for the original HP35's
    > arithmetic key placement, however, which was on the
    > left, with [+] and[*] adjacent in the middle
    > of the grouping, but that has long been forgotten.


    On Tue, 29 May 2007 08:23:50 -0500, Dave wrote:

    > And what were those good reasons?


    Your right hand (most people are right-handed)
    does not hide the keys while you are entering digits,
    so you can see the (less frequently pressed)
    operation keys all the time, and may find them
    slightly faster and with fewer errors.

    > Being a right hander I find having the last key I usually press (the
    > arithmetic keys) on the left hand side very inefficient, as I have to
    > move my hand to the left side, press the key and then bring my hand
    > all the way back over to the naturally resting right side again.
    > That's poor layout in my book. Having the arithmetic keys on the right
    > side is more natural and efficient IMHO.


    If the operation keys were on the right, the (more frequently pressed)
    7,4,1,0 column of digit keys would be just as far to the left instead
    (see the photo at http://www.hpmuseum.org/four35s.jpg);
    in fact, all the (more frequently pressed) digit keys
    would be farther to the left than otherwise,
    so you would, given that you rest your hand on the right side,
    always be performing more movement over the long run,
    however you may believe otherwise (ask people who are unaware
    of what's to be analyzed to just work out some problems,
    make videos of their movements, and see what adds up).

    The grouping of the (more frequently used) [+] and[*]
    operators at the center seems also to have been based
    on similar consideration, including that the sequence[*] [+] is used all the time when adding sums of products.

    We don't primarily use scientific calculators now to add up
    long grocery lists or invoices, however, so other considerations,
    including "what everyone else (or a competitor) does"
    come to be more important.

    Oh, by the way, if having operation keys at the right,
    by your resting hand, is so important, why isn't
    the frequently used ENTER key being at the very bottom right,
    accompanying the arithmetic keys,
    the very best place for it to be?

    On the original HP35, ENTER was in fact at the top
    of the arithmentic operators column; as time has passed
    (and the 49 series appeared), many wails have arisen
    about ENTER having moved to where it is, still along with
    the other most common functions, but I never heard anyone
    wail about the earlier moving of the arithmetic keys,
    perhaps because everyone was already conditioned
    by the rest of the industry having generally
    put arithmetic keys on the right, in the same order,
    which now one would fight to keep, just because
    it's become ingrained habit (which itself is one reason
    for established precedent to continue being followed,
    even if arbitrary, just as in law).

    --

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