First of all, thanks to the experienced users of HP 50 who are willing
to share their knowledge. Without men like John Meyer and Dave Boyd,
many of us, who are new to this powerful calculator would be on a
slower learning curve.

I have had Staples print the manual from the CDs into four spiral
notebooks and at the front of each manual I have a sheet which perhaps
explains the Numeric versus Symbolic. The sheet has helped me, and
perhaps it will help those who are new to this powerful calculator.
This is what I came out with: (Note: fix 2 is assumed, and a real 5 at
fix 2 is 5.00 and an integer 5 is a 5 {no decimal} ) There are four
Combinations of possibilites.

x ___ Numeric or equal to _____ Symbolic
____ Approx or equal to x_____ Exact

Square root of 5 enter =======> 2.24
Pi enter =======> 3.14
Real vrs interger: 5 =========> 5


x ___ Numeric or equal to _____ Symbolic
x ____ Approx or equal to _____ Exact

Square root of 5 enter =======> 2.24
Pi enter =======> 3.14
Real vrs interger: 5 =========> 5.00



___ Numeric or equal to x_____ Symbolic
____ Approx or equal to x_____ Exact

Square root of 5 enter =======> Square root of 5
Pi enter =======> Pi and Eval (Pi) ===> Pi
Real vrs interger: 5 =========> 5




___ Numeric or equal to x_____ Symbolic
x ____ Approx or equal to _____ Exact

Square root of 5 enter =======> 2.24
Pi enter =======> Pi
Real vrs interger: 5 =========> 5.00

Right shift numeric appears to force all symbolics into real
numbers.

The beauty of the HP 50 is that it allows for all possiblitites,
numeric versus symbolic, approx vrs exact, real versus integer. For
example, in textbooks, radian measurement is often symbolized as 3 pi,
etc,, and HP 50 allows for this type of answer. The HP 50 reminds me
of a Biochemistry class that showed that complexity is necessary in
order to allow for all possible situations. The reason that Casio is
less beautiful is that one is restricted to fewer possibilites. I
perfect HP 50, but I do respect the opinion of others in their taste
of complexity.