Just in case you don't read slashdot. . . - Hewlett Packard

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Thread: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

  1. Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .


  2. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    Hi,

    Considering the nature of this event,this new calculator is more
    likely a special edition of the HP35,thus being uninteresting besides
    perhaps for nostalgic.
    I somehow doubt that HP will release a successor for the HP49G serie
    or a really new high end calculator ,anytime soon.
    I hoped for sometime that they would use Qonos technology as a
    starting point,but with the involvement of hydrix in both the NSpire
    development and apparently the Vernier Labquest,it is more and more
    unlikely.
    If i had to guess,i would say that Qonos is the base for the Vernier
    LabQuest and its potential successors.

    On 10 avr, 16:46, "TW" wrote:
    > http://www.computerworld.com/blogs/node/5323
    >
    > TW




  3. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    > I somehow doubt that HP will release a successor for the HP49G serie
    > or a really new high end calculator ,anytime soon.


    They already have released a successor to the 49g series (Unless you
    consider the 50g to be part of the 49g series)


    Tom Lake



  4. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    The HP50G belongs to the HP49G serie as it is basically a HP49G
    emulator plus some goodies and it is what the HP49G+ and perhaps even
    the HP49G should have been.
    At the HP49 launch event in 1999,there was someone from HP France who
    was quite pissed off and who was saying that the HP49 should have
    used both an ARM CPU and an emulator for the Saturn code.
    I didn't agree with him at the time because i thought that with the
    context and given the ressources i thought they had, the ACO did a
    great job.
    However considering the products canceled such as HP Xpander and
    Callysto,i now think that the ACO had significantly more ressources
    than i thought and should perhaps have a different strategy.
    For example,they could have kept saturn for low end models such as the
    HP39G and the HP40G(which btw should have featured less RAM(128 KB)
    and built-in Flash ROM) and go for the emulator way for the high end
    model which could have featured both an emulator mode and another mode
    like the Qonos.
    However what is done is done.
    Btw,if HP is still serious about calculator business,they should as
    soon as possible for the low model end graphing model as a true killer
    from TI is coming:The NSpire without CAS.

    On 11 avr, 07:32, "Tom Lake" wrote:
    > > I somehow doubt that HP will release a successor for the HP49G serie
    > > or a really new high end calculator ,anytime soon.

    >
    > They already have released a successor to the 49g series (Unless you
    > consider the 50g to be part of the 49g series)
    >
    > Tom Lake




  5. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    > I somehow doubt that HP will release a successor for the HP49G serie
    > or a really new high end calculator ,anytime soon.


    Nope. It will take longer to develop. My predicition is that it will
    be a new scientific with classic coloration, form and a large ENTER
    key. Hopefully it will have capabilities surpassing the 33S, but more
    likely a replacement (same capabilities, but in a new body).

    > If i had to guess,i would say that Qonos is the base for the Vernier
    > LabQuest and its potential successors.


    I wouldn't say that. Doesn't appear to have any connection to me.

    TW


  6. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    > They already have released a successor to the 49g series (Unless you
    > consider the 50g to be part of the 49g series)



    I think I would classify the 49G as the continuation of the 48
    series. The 49g+/50g add enough different features that they really
    are a successor (not a huge leap of course), but have enough added
    capabilities and differences that they are a successor.

    Of course saying the 50g is a leap ahead of the 49g+ isn't anywhere
    close to the truth. Just a small feature bump and repackaging.

    TW



  7. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    TW wrote:
    >> I somehow doubt that HP will release a successor for the HP49G serie
    >> or a really new high end calculator ,anytime soon.

    >
    > Nope. It will take longer to develop. My predicition is that it will
    > be a new scientific with classic coloration, form and a large ENTER
    > key. Hopefully it will have capabilities surpassing the 33S, but more
    > likely a replacement (same capabilities, but in a new body).


    Given the few changes made for all other "anniversary editions", I think
    that even that is wishful thinking. A 33s, with new "classic"
    coloration, and perhaps a new font, is all I expect (and it will be very
    welcome indeed). What you describe would be even more welcome of course.

    Now, what's "classic" coloration? I tend to think of it as black, with
    orange and medium blue secondary functions, a la the Voyagers; but they
    could go back further to the 45 or 55 or 65, with various shades of
    gray, or the 67, with all that and those light brown keys.

    As far as looks go, I'll take the 65 over everything else.



    --
    Dave Boyd
    "That's sucker talk."
    -- Raven, _This_Gun_For_Hire_, Universal, 1942

  8. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    > Now, what's "classic" coloration?

    I think just darker and subdued, like the 50G, goes a long way toward
    regaining that classic feel. Note that I really have no strong
    feeling on coloration as the blue 49G was my first calculator. I
    wasn't even born back in "classical" times. :-)

    TW


  9. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    TW wrote:
    >> Now, what's "classic" coloration?

    >
    > I think just darker and subdued, like the 50G, goes a long way toward
    > regaining that classic feel. Note that I really have no strong
    > feeling on coloration as the blue 49G was my first calculator. I
    > wasn't even born back in "classical" times. :-)


    My first HP was a HP-16C, bought after high school when I was going off
    to computer school, for the Marines... in 1983. When I first saw the
    49G, I though it was ugly, and rubber-dome keys? Blasphemy! I didn't
    get one, got a 49G+, and later sold that to get a 50G because I liked
    the coloration better. After time, I got to like the coloration on the
    49G and 49G+ much more. My tastes have widened I guess! I now own a 49G.


    --
    Dave Boyd
    "That's sucker talk."
    -- Raven, _This_Gun_For_Hire_, Universal, 1942

  10. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    TW wrote:
    >> I somehow doubt that HP will release a successor for the HP49G serie
    >> or a really new high end calculator ,anytime soon.

    >
    > Nope. It will take longer to develop. My predicition is that it will
    > be a new scientific with classic coloration, form and a large ENTER
    > key. Hopefully it will have capabilities surpassing the 33S, but more
    > likely a replacement (same capabilities, but in a new body).


    to admit>

    The only way to get an exact replica HP-35 would be to include a
    complete PC-on-a-chip, install DOS, then Eric's Nonpareil emulator with
    the HP-35 ROM.

    That will comfortably fit in a case the same physical size as the
    original '35. Just need to source some red LEDs...




    --
    Bruce Horrocks
    Surrey
    England
    (bruce at scorecrow dot com)

  11. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    On Wed, 11 Apr 2007 11:26:44 -0500, TW wrote:

    > I think I would classify the 49G as the continuation of the 48
    > series. The 49g+/50g add enough different features that they really
    > are a successor (not a huge leap of course), but have enough added
    > capabilities and differences that they are a successor.


    Except for the ability (with added software help)
    to make use of the internal ARM processor without the emulation layer,
    the 49G+/50G must certainly be exactly the same in programming capability
    as the 49G, particularly since they can all use exactly the same Saturn ROM
    (version 2.09 can be installed into a 49G as well as into 49G+/50G)

    The 49G was already incompatible with 48G[X],
    having already relocated most things in ROM,
    added the CAS, Filer, new keyboard, etc.
    (and gutted the original symbolic facilities,
    which sometimes work better and/or faster,
    though only of course for a subset of current capability).

    You do get added hardware in 49G+/50G (IR, taller screen, SD card, USB),
    but all programming is still the same as 49G (or else don't use
    what I post, because it's all developed on emulated 49G,
    even though nowadays with ROM 2.09 or later

    For the very picky: just these keyboard function locations
    were also swapped between 49G and 49G+: CAT<->EVAL and EQW<->[']

    -[ ]-

  12. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    Hi

    Yao Konan wrote:
    > At the HP49 launch event in 1999,there was someone from HP France who
    > was quite pissed off and who was saying that the HP49 should have
    > used both an ARM CPU and an emulator for the Saturn code.


    I seriously doubt anyone at HP France would have made such claim as
    there was absolutely no-one at HP who was technicaly-minded. It was
    purely a marketing and support division.

    The only time an ARM was considered for the HP4x platform was several
    years later, after ACO closed down.

    JY

  13. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    TW wrote:
    >
    > I think I would classify the 49G as the continuation of the 48
    > series. The 49g+/50g add enough different features that they really
    > are a successor (not a huge leap of course), but have enough added
    > capabilities and differences that they are a successor.


    Except that the effort to create the HP49 was far greater than for
    create the HP49G+.

    On the software point of view, the 49G+ was done in less than 6 months
    (mainly done by Hydrix), it took more than one year with a significantly
    bigger team to create the HP49G

    JY

  14. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    Hi,

    The guy belonged to the HP team at his event.
    And i clearly remember what he said even though he didn't say it
    loudly.
    Moreover this possbility didn't need to have been considered by HP
    before,to have some guy with some engineering skills think about it.
    After all weren't many guys here asking why a ARM CPU and emulator
    hadn't been used instead of the SATURN ?

    On 21 avr, 04:12, Jean-Yves Avenard wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > Yao Konan wrote:
    > > At the HP49 launch event in 1999,there was someone from HP France who
    > > was quite pissed off and who was saying that the HP49 should have
    > > used both an ARM CPU and an emulator for the Saturn code.

    >
    > I seriously doubt anyone at HP France would have made such claim as
    > there was absolutely no-one at HP who was technicaly-minded. It was
    > purely a marketing and support division.
    >
    > The only time an ARM was considered for the HP4x platform was several
    > years later, after ACO closed down.
    >
    > JY




  15. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    James M. Prange wrote:
    > Something that I've wondered about is your H120 Bluetooth Thermal
    > Printer. Given that Hydrix can offer a hand-held printer with
    > Bluetooth I/O, no doubt RS-232, RedEye, or IrDA I/O compatible

    It has RS232 and IR already... It's not just a BT printer

    JY

  16. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    Jean-Yves Avenard wrote:
    > James M. Prange wrote:
    >> Something that I've wondered about is your H120 Bluetooth Thermal
    >> Printer. Given that Hydrix can offer a hand-held printer with
    >> Bluetooth I/O, no doubt RS-232, RedEye, or IrDA I/O compatible

    > It has RS232 and IR already... It's not just a BT printer


    That's interesting. I don't see that information at the Hydrix
    site. Perhaps it should be added?

    By "IR", do you mean IrDA, or the "RedEye" IR signal as used on
    the HP 82240A/B printers, or the Serial IR as used between 48
    series calculators, or perhaps some combination of these?

    More to the point, does its IR work with the 48 series, or the 49
    series, or perhaps both?

    Is the H120 printer alone available as a retail product?

    --
    Regards,
    James


  17. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    James M. Prange wrote:
    >
    > That's interesting. I don't see that information at the Hydrix
    > site. Perhaps it should be added?

    It's not listed on our new site but earlier you could download the brochune

    >
    > By "IR", do you mean IrDA, or the "RedEye" IR signal as used on
    > the HP 82240A/B printers, or the Serial IR as used between 48
    > series calculators, or perhaps some combination of these?

    IR means IrDA, however it is designed to work as an HP printer too.

    >
    > More to the point, does its IR work with the 48 series, or the 49
    > series, or perhaps both?

    The 49 series use the same IR printer as the 48 series

    > Is the H120 printer alone available as a retail product?

    At that stage we do not have the infrastructure to retail the product,
    only wholesale.
    We've been contacted by a few companies to retail the product. Will see
    how it goes.

    JY

  18. Re: Just in case you don't read slashdot. . .

    Jean-Yves Avenard wrote:
    > James M. Prange wrote:
    >> That's interesting. I don't see that information at the Hydrix
    >> site. Perhaps it should be added?

    > It's not listed on our new site but earlier you could download the brochune


    Sorry, it seems that I overlooked that on the previous pages.

    >> By "IR", do you mean IrDA, or the "RedEye" IR signal as used on
    >> the HP 82240A/B printers, or the Serial IR as used between 48
    >> series calculators, or perhaps some combination of these?

    > IR means IrDA, however it is designed to work as an HP printer too.


    By "it is designed to work as an HP printer too", I take it that
    it can be used with anything that an HP 82240A/B can be used with?

    >> More to the point, does its IR work with the 48 series, or the 49
    >> series, or perhaps both?

    > The 49 series use the same IR printer as the 48 series


    Well, yes, except of course the 49G which lacks IR entirely, but I
    believe that the 49 series can also print to an IrDA printer. The
    character sets may well differ, but the I/O translation mode
    applies when printing via IrDA, and that's good enough for me.

    >> Is the H120 printer alone available as a retail product?

    > At that stage we do not have the infrastructure to retail the product,
    > only wholesale.


    Okay, I can understand that.

    > We've been contacted by a few companies to retail the product. Will see
    > how it goes.


    Let us know if it becomes available to ordinary consumers, of
    course.

    --
    Regards,
    James


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