Visual Studio 2005 - Hewlett Packard

This is a discussion on Visual Studio 2005 - Hewlett Packard ; I just finished reading "Visual Studio 2005 for Dummies", and I must admit, I'm thoroughly impressed with the MS view of the world. Granted, there was much I did not really understand all that well (I'm dumber than most), but ...

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  1. Visual Studio 2005

    I just finished reading "Visual Studio 2005 for Dummies", and I must
    admit, I'm thoroughly impressed with the MS view of the world. Granted,
    there was much I did not really understand all that well (I'm dumber
    than most), but as an IDE, VS2005 is really cool. The book delves into
    all manner of MS stuff that can be dealt with from within VS2005
    including very, very basic overviews of ADO.NET, ASP.NET, VB, C#, and
    Crystal Reports just to name a few. I can tell you right now that from
    what I read of Crystal Reports (not a MS product), it's truly an awesome
    product!!! Much of the MS world uses click, drag-and-drop to generate
    code in place of the old coding methods of type, type and type.



    As a reference book, I can't speak to its value, but I can say that it
    does a decent job of introducing you to the MS world, which, BTW, is
    really extensive and one could even say daunting to set about learning.

    One big negative that I see is that upgrading to new .NET versions is a
    chore. For instance, a program developed under .NET 1 may not run
    correctly for .NET 2, so for a large enterprise, that could get
    expensive trying to upgrade. There are claims, however, that any
    migration snags you run into have all been resolved by someone else
    previously, and you can find out how to fix your problem at the MSDN
    page.

    After reading this book, I can say that MS world looks really fun, and
    if anyone was wondering about all that MS stuff, this book may help you
    get a clue.





    Warm regards,









    Raymond Shahan

    Information Systems
    REPUBLIC TITLE OF TEXAS, INC.
    2701 W Plano Parkway
    <http://maps.yahoo.com/maps_result?ad...ay&csz=75075&c
    ountry=us&new=1&name=&qty=>
    Plano, TX 75075




    direct 214.556.0202
    main 972.578.8611
    fax 972.424.5621

    www.republictitle.com

    rshahan@republictitle.com

    Life is not a journey to the grave with the
    intention of arriving safely in a pretty and
    well preserved body, but rather to skid in
    broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out,
    and loudly proclaiming:

    -- WOW!!! What a Ride!!!




    * To join/leave the list, search archives, change list settings, *
    * etc., please visit http://raven.utc.edu/archives/hp3000-l.html *


  2. Re: Visual Studio 2005

    I am trying to learn PHP and MYSQL, also AJAX and I bought all the Dummies
    books for these. They are written in a way that even I understand them. I
    am actually using them to build a web site that folks logon to, database and
    all. These books are great!



    -----Original Message-----
    From: HP-3000 Systems Discussion [mailto:HP3000-L@RAVEN.UTC.EDU] On Behalf
    Of Ray Shahan
    Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2007 5:05 PM
    To: HP3000-L@RAVEN.UTC.EDU
    Subject: [HP3000-L] Visual Studio 2005

    I just finished reading "Visual Studio 2005 for Dummies", and I must
    admit, I'm thoroughly impressed with the MS view of the world. Granted,
    there was much I did not really understand all that well (I'm dumber
    than most), but as an IDE, VS2005 is really cool. The book delves into
    all manner of MS stuff that can be dealt with from within VS2005
    including very, very basic overviews of ADO.NET, ASP.NET, VB, C#, and
    Crystal Reports just to name a few. I can tell you right now that from
    what I read of Crystal Reports (not a MS product), it's truly an awesome
    product!!! Much of the MS world uses click, drag-and-drop to generate
    code in place of the old coding methods of type, type and type.



    As a reference book, I can't speak to its value, but I can say that it
    does a decent job of introducing you to the MS world, which, BTW, is
    really extensive and one could even say daunting to set about learning.

    One big negative that I see is that upgrading to new .NET versions is a
    chore. For instance, a program developed under .NET 1 may not run
    correctly for .NET 2, so for a large enterprise, that could get
    expensive trying to upgrade. There are claims, however, that any
    migration snags you run into have all been resolved by someone else
    previously, and you can find out how to fix your problem at the MSDN
    page.

    After reading this book, I can say that MS world looks really fun, and
    if anyone was wondering about all that MS stuff, this book may help you
    get a clue.





    Warm regards,









    Raymond Shahan

    Information Systems
    REPUBLIC TITLE OF TEXAS, INC.
    2701 W Plano Parkway
    <http://maps.yahoo.com/maps_result?ad...ay&csz=75075&c
    ountry=us&new=1&name=&qty=>
    Plano, TX 75075




    direct 214.556.0202
    main 972.578.8611
    fax 972.424.5621

    www.republictitle.com

    rshahan@republictitle.com

    Life is not a journey to the grave with the
    intention of arriving safely in a pretty and
    well preserved body, but rather to skid in
    broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out,
    and loudly proclaiming:

    -- WOW!!! What a Ride!!!




    * To join/leave the list, search archives, change list settings, *
    * etc., please visit http://raven.utc.edu/archives/hp3000-l.html *

    * To join/leave the list, search archives, change list settings, *
    * etc., please visit http://raven.utc.edu/archives/hp3000-l.html *


  3. Re: Visual Studio 2005

    I've been using Visual Studio (primarily VB) for two years now. I started in
    Nov 2005 when MS offered the Express Edition for free (I believe it is still
    free).

    While I worked in COBOL on the 3K, lots of my work was in SPL, C & Fortran.
    I'd also 'grown up' on Visual Basic /VBA, C and Assembler for the PC.

    After reading lots of the MS propaganda I really expected it to be a snap.
    The
    IDE lets you design the screen & the code practically generates itself.
    Right?

    WRONG !!!

    If you have worked extensively with the HP Intrinsics ( or with SPL which is
    merely
    a device for stringing intrinsics together -- as Ben Norton used to say),
    then you
    might think you've got a good start. Not So really.

    Think of C or SPL with 50,000 intrinsics ... most of them with 5, 10, 50
    variations
    (and more) and probably half of them Option Variable.

    Don't get me wrong. I really enjoy working with VS2005. But then, I'm a
    masochist.
    I'm also retired and don't have to program for a living anymore ... it's all
    fun and games
    for me now.

    Even with a strong reference library (NOT ... For Dummies) expect to spend a
    great
    deal of time in MSDN library. Every thing you probably need it there -- IF
    YOU CAN
    FIND IT. It is a chore getting into the MS Frame of Mind to "out-think" the
    Help
    facility to find what you need.

    Depending on your language (VB, C++, J#, F#, C#, etc.) there are many, many
    great help
    sites on the net. You will also find yourself spending a lot of time there.
    Also, MS runs
    hundreds of Forums you'll need to frequent.

    Check with friends who program MS. I think you will find that the 'Division
    of Labor' among
    the programming staff is unreal. Everyone has to "specialize" in smaller and
    smaller pieces
    of the pie. It is extremely difficult to 'wrap your mind' around more than a
    small piece of
    the puzzle.

    Also realize, understanding the OO paradigm is also necessary. This is not
    something
    you will feel comfortable with initially.

    True, the results can be very impressive, but the small 1 to 10 man COBOL
    shop model
    you are used to on the 3K just ain't gonna do it. Take a look at the VS
    Live conference
    agenda, for example, to see what passes for intro level sessions. You need
    years of
    experience to understand the speakers.

    MS makes it seem that VS is simple as preparing sliced bread. It's more like
    a preparing
    a 10 course Mandarin dinner.

    Jump in for the fun of it ... but realize it's not a free lunch.

    Over the past 30+ years I've often thought of the many, many opportunities
    HP 'BLEW' !!
    They had the first PC in the old boat anchor terminal (4???). Think if they
    had used floppy
    disks instead of tapes and upgraded from the 4045 to 8086 chip.

    The Classic 3k was REALLY a RISC machine -- only 128 basic assembly
    instructions
    (true, backed by micro code).

    And, of course, IMAGE. Still nothing can touch it in its nitch. As Alfredo
    has shown, it
    was 'relational' before the term was invented.

    As the SciFi channel says "If ...".

    Oh well, just an old man's rant.

    Roger


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