HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD - Hewlett Packard

This is a discussion on HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD - Hewlett Packard ; I purchased a new dv8000t laptop from HP, and they refuse to send me the OEM installation CD for the XP operating system, saying it is already loaded on the machine. Can they do this? I'm not happy, I paid ...

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Thread: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

  1. HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    I purchased a new dv8000t laptop from HP, and they refuse to send me the OEM
    installation CD for the XP operating system, saying it is already loaded on
    the machine. Can they do this? I'm not happy, I paid for Windows XP and I
    don't have an installable copy.



  2. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    Apparently they can. From what I know they partition a section of the hard
    drive with your "copy" of WindowsXP, therefore they have provided you with
    it already. However you can only access it with the HP Restore CD's. Quite
    an effective way to keep people from installing OEM copies onto multiple
    machines, if you ask me.
    Why do you need the installation CD? surely if you were going to reformat
    you'd just backup your critical data and do the HP Factory System Restore
    from the CD's?

    wrote in message
    news:gi03h.1475$Mw.531@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com. ..
    >I purchased a new dv8000t laptop from HP, and they refuse to send me the
    >OEM installation CD for the XP operating system, saying it is already
    >loaded on the machine. Can they do this? I'm not happy, I paid for Windows
    >XP and I don't have an installable copy.
    >




  3. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    Gonzo wrote:
    > Fine, I don't really care if HP wants to play word games with their
    > customers and I do understand all that but here is my main 2 legit beefs
    > with them:
    >
    > 1)They MAKE you buy a crippled OS (no install CD option) and do not give you
    > a Sans OS choice or Linux choice.


    I think your situation is somewhat uncommon since you bought via the
    web directly from HP, i.e. not in a store.

    When you buy in a store, you normally have no OS option at all, i.e.
    also not for (XP) Home versus Pro, and it should be clear whether or not
    you get media (CD/DVD) and what type. (I.e. *ask.)

    Moral: *If* you buy via the web, then know *exactly* what you're
    buying. *If* you don't get what you expected, then *return* the product.
    Complaining, a long time after the fact, in some Usenet newsgroup or
    other forum does not help a bit. It also does *not* serve other
    potential buyers, because, as has been mentioned, the situation is
    dependent on what you buy (i.e. which model), when you buy/bought (i.e.
    the situation changes over time) and where you buy (i.e. web versus
    shop, US versus other country, etc.).

    > 2)They did not advise me that I was buying a pre-install only OS on their
    > buy/configure your PC page when I was choosing the options for my d1000e
    > system.
    >
    > Yes, you can search and find info about restore CD directions on their self
    > help web page till your blue in the face. But this information was
    > blatantly absent when I clicked on their "buy now" page.


    But I'm sure that they also did not mention that you *did* get media,
    what type (i.e. Restore, OEM, retail product as bought from MS) and (OS)
    documentation.

    I.e. you assumed that you would get media and assumed which type, and
    you assumed incorrectly.

    [deleted]

  4. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    > Microsoft insists on near absolute rigor in matching COAs with
    > Windows versions. The only exception here is that when you
    > install the OEM version on the name brand computer, the install
    > does not even ask for a COA product key, instead using one baked
    > onto the CD... Ben Myers


    Hmm... I also have access to the OEM Generic CDs (MS Partner Program Action
    Pack). Anyway, recently, my HD bit the dust on my Compaq Laptop (originally
    delivered with Compaq OEM XP Pro) and I used the generic OEM XP Pro CD to
    reinstall, using my COA affixed to the laptop. I was prompted to enter it.
    Afterward, my on-line activation failed with a "already been activated" type
    message and I was instructed to use the phone. I did. My phone activation
    went fine (explained that I had changed the HD).

    But it did prompt me for a COA, on a Compaq.

    -Frank



  5. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD


    "EvilNem" wrote
    > OEM editions are restricted to the hard drive they are supplied with


    No. OEM license is restricted to the machine it is supplied with, not just
    the HDD. Which is why there's a sticker with the license key stuck to the
    PC, not the HDD.



  6. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD


    "Gonzo" wrote
    >
    > Vote with your wallet. That's how they will get the message.
    >


    Hmmm... People are doing that. The message HP are getting right now is
    "You're better than Dell"



  7. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD


    "EvilNem" wrote
    > OEM - Original Equipment Manufacturer
    > In Australia at least, when you buy an OEM Windows XP it must be bought
    > with a new hard drive, it stays with that hard drive for the life of the
    > device, when it dies -technically- the license dies with it.


    That's just not how it works.
    Given the number of HDDs that fail, there's no way that HP are going to be
    dumb enough to shell out the cost of a new Windows license each time they
    need to replace an HDD.
    HDD replacement is a routine thing. It happens often. Therefore, it is as
    low cost as possible.



  8. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD


    "Gonzo" wrote
    >
    > Simple,
    >
    > You paid for the OS whether you wanted it or NOT. HP forces you to pay
    > for it and then limits what you can or can't do with it and that is
    > Bull****!
    >


    Not that simple. It's just that as a small consumer, you have to buy what
    they have to sell. As most consumers want an MS OS with their PC, that's
    what they negotiate with MS, and that's what they sell. That's what's right
    for most small businesses as well.

    > Because your hardware may change over the years. You may even have a
    > completely new and different chipset motherboard installed, or different
    > 3d card, modem, etc. Restore CD does not have drivers for a fresh
    > installation so...
    >
    > A restore CD will **** this up!


    A restore CD will only "**** up" you machine if you've "****ed up" you
    machine in the 1st place.

    Adding HW changes the machine. Beleive it or not, most machines do NOT get
    changed over their lifetime - they stay as is. The most common upgrade is
    more memory, which will not stop a restore CD from working anyway.

    If you know what you're doing, you can troubleshoot. If you don't know what
    you're doing, you won't have changed any hardware in the 1st place.

    If you've changed you PC significantly, then it is not longer the PC that
    the manufacturor supplied => you can't expect the manufacturor to supply you
    with free support. YOU have to take responsibility for it, and that includes
    documenting the steps you too to get to where you got, and making
    appropriate backups.


    > If your computer breaks and you use it's leftover parts to build a new
    > system, you should be able to transfer the OS (which you PAYED for) over
    > to your new system and install it fresh.


    You paid for OEM. MS offer a number of different licensing models. Some
    allow this, some don't.

    > You may also have important documents, photos, movies on your system and
    > certain custom configurations that you need. And if your hard drive
    > crashes...
    >
    > A restore CD will **** this up!


    If you get this far, YOU have ****ed up. Backup your data.

    > This is the last HP system I will buy and I will recommend all my
    > customers, associates and friends to stay away from HP products.


    A bad workman always blames his tools.

    These are the tools you work with. It's up to you to make them work, to make
    them manageable, to pay the true cost of running and supporting them.

    > If HP wants to play games the we will get them in the only place they care
    > about, their wallet.


    You think Dell are any better?



  9. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    You were prompted for activation which failed because you used a non-Compaq XP
    Pro install CD... Ben Myers

    On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 10:17:03 -0700, "Frankster" wrote:

    >> Microsoft insists on near absolute rigor in matching COAs with
    >> Windows versions. The only exception here is that when you
    >> install the OEM version on the name brand computer, the install
    >> does not even ask for a COA product key, instead using one baked
    >> onto the CD... Ben Myers

    >
    >Hmm... I also have access to the OEM Generic CDs (MS Partner Program Action
    >Pack). Anyway, recently, my HD bit the dust on my Compaq Laptop (originally
    >delivered with Compaq OEM XP Pro) and I used the generic OEM XP Pro CD to
    >reinstall, using my COA affixed to the laptop. I was prompted to enter it.
    >Afterward, my on-line activation failed with a "already been activated" type
    >message and I was instructed to use the phone. I did. My phone activation
    >went fine (explained that I had changed the HD).
    >
    >But it did prompt me for a COA, on a Compaq.
    >
    >-Frank
    >


  10. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    I disagree with such a blanket statement, because it does not take into account
    the distributor-reseller-customer relationship. As a reseller dealing with a
    distributor, my reseller is bound by contract with Micro$oft to sell an OEM copy
    of Windows with EITHER a motherboard or a hard drive, not a whole computer. Once
    I have installed Window$ on the computer, then and only then does it become part
    of the computer. The computer chassis anyway... Ben Myers

    On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 18:30:24 +0100, "Jez T"
    wrote:

    >
    >"EvilNem" wrote
    >> OEM editions are restricted to the hard drive they are supplied with

    >
    >No. OEM license is restricted to the machine it is supplied with, not just
    >the HDD. Which is why there's a sticker with the license key stuck to the
    >PC, not the HDD.
    >


  11. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    That could be true about activation, I guess. But the operator told me that
    I had already used that product key one time, and that is why the activation
    didn't work on-line. She acted as if this was routine upon HD replacement.

    But... What I was actually addressing (not so much activation) was that I
    was prompted for a product key in the beginning. I thought you said, on a
    name brand computer, you would not even be prompted for a product key when
    using the generic OEM disks. No?

    -Frank

    "Ben Myers" wrote in message
    newsf0vk2p42t1vukkkmd2q4mvp7273u8igvt@4ax.com...
    > You were prompted for activation which failed because you used a
    > non-Compaq XP
    > Pro install CD... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 10:17:03 -0700, "Frankster"
    > wrote:
    >
    >>> Microsoft insists on near absolute rigor in matching COAs with
    >>> Windows versions. The only exception here is that when you
    >>> install the OEM version on the name brand computer, the install
    >>> does not even ask for a COA product key, instead using one baked
    >>> onto the CD... Ben Myers

    >>
    >>Hmm... I also have access to the OEM Generic CDs (MS Partner Program
    >>Action
    >>Pack). Anyway, recently, my HD bit the dust on my Compaq Laptop
    >>(originally
    >>delivered with Compaq OEM XP Pro) and I used the generic OEM XP Pro CD to
    >>reinstall, using my COA affixed to the laptop. I was prompted to enter it.
    >>Afterward, my on-line activation failed with a "already been activated"
    >>type
    >>message and I was instructed to use the phone. I did. My phone activation
    >>went fine (explained that I had changed the HD).
    >>
    >>But it did prompt me for a COA, on a Compaq.
    >>
    >>-Frank
    >>




  12. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD


    > On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 18:30:24 +0100, "Jez T"
    >
    >>"EvilNem" wrote
    >>> OEM editions are restricted to the hard drive they are supplied with

    >>
    >>No. OEM license is restricted to the machine it is supplied with, not just
    >>the HDD. Which is why there's a sticker with the license key stuck to the
    >>PC, not the HDD.


    "Ben Myers" wrote
    >I disagree with such a blanket statement, because it does not take into
    >account
    > the distributor-reseller-customer relationship. As a reseller dealing
    > with a
    > distributor, my reseller is bound by contract with Micro$oft to sell an
    > OEM copy
    > of Windows with EITHER a motherboard or a hard drive, not a whole
    > computer. Once
    > I have installed Window$ on the computer, then and only then does it
    > become part
    > of the computer. The computer chassis anyway... Ben Myers


    If it helps - On HP servers, when you buy an OEM license of say Win2003 SBS,
    then it is bound to the _serial_number_ of the server.
    You can replace _any_ part on that server (very few parts on HP servers do
    not have a replacement spare part), but the _serial_ number stays the same,
    therefore the OEM license is still bound to the machine.

    I /think/ that when you get any HP supplied OEM Windows OS, it has a routine
    in it that checks to make sure the serian number is valid. This is certainly
    the case on Storage Servers (DL380G4 SS for instance), because you cannot
    recover a Storage Server unless the serial number is correct, and if you
    change the serial number on the systemboard (through BIOS), the OS will stop
    working.



  13. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    Jez obviously knows more on this than me, my boss always told me what I had
    reiterated to the group (probably should have stated that), still, good to
    know what I know now, though I'm not in the service industry anymore, heh
    Now I'm stuck administering a bunch of ... wait for it... HP servers =P

    "Jez T" wrote in message
    news:454fa7ca$0$1117$ba620e4c@news.skynet.be...
    >
    >> On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 18:30:24 +0100, "Jez T"
    >>
    >>>"EvilNem" wrote
    >>>> OEM editions are restricted to the hard drive they are supplied with
    >>>
    >>>No. OEM license is restricted to the machine it is supplied with, not
    >>>just
    >>>the HDD. Which is why there's a sticker with the license key stuck to the
    >>>PC, not the HDD.

    >
    > "Ben Myers" wrote
    >>I disagree with such a blanket statement, because it does not take into
    >>account
    >> the distributor-reseller-customer relationship. As a reseller dealing
    >> with a
    >> distributor, my reseller is bound by contract with Micro$oft to sell an
    >> OEM copy
    >> of Windows with EITHER a motherboard or a hard drive, not a whole
    >> computer. Once
    >> I have installed Window$ on the computer, then and only then does it
    >> become part
    >> of the computer. The computer chassis anyway... Ben Myers

    >
    > If it helps - On HP servers, when you buy an OEM license of say Win2003
    > SBS, then it is bound to the _serial_number_ of the server.
    > You can replace _any_ part on that server (very few parts on HP servers do
    > not have a replacement spare part), but the _serial_ number stays the
    > same, therefore the OEM license is still bound to the machine.
    >
    > I /think/ that when you get any HP supplied OEM Windows OS, it has a
    > routine in it that checks to make sure the serian number is valid. This is
    > certainly the case on Storage Servers (DL380G4 SS for instance), because
    > you cannot recover a Storage Server unless the serial number is correct,
    > and if you change the serial number on the systemboard (through BIOS), the
    > OS will stop working.
    >




  14. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD


    "EvilNem" wrote
    > Jez obviously knows more on this than me,


    - Nothing online should be taken as obvious.
    - Now, I merely know as much as you...

    > Now I'm stuck administering a bunch of ... wait for it... HP servers =P


    Good for you. Could be IBMs or could be Dell!
    HP Proliant servers rock
    IBMs are OK, but their management features are not as good as HP
    Dells suck
    If you ever come accross an HP Netserver, run - they're worse than Dells.




  15. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    Same reason for being prompted for a product key. You used a generic OEM CD
    which requires a product key. Had you used a Compaq CD, it **PROBABLY** would
    not have asked for one. I know that the Dell CD does not, when installed on a
    Dell... Ben Myers

    On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 11:56:09 -0700, "Frankster" wrote:

    >That could be true about activation, I guess. But the operator told me that
    >I had already used that product key one time, and that is why the activation
    >didn't work on-line. She acted as if this was routine upon HD replacement.
    >
    >But... What I was actually addressing (not so much activation) was that I
    >was prompted for a product key in the beginning. I thought you said, on a
    >name brand computer, you would not even be prompted for a product key when
    >using the generic OEM disks. No?
    >
    >-Frank
    >
    >"Ben Myers" wrote in message
    >newsf0vk2p42t1vukkkmd2q4mvp7273u8igvt@4ax.com...
    >> You were prompted for activation which failed because you used a
    >> non-Compaq XP
    >> Pro install CD... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 10:17:03 -0700, "Frankster"
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Microsoft insists on near absolute rigor in matching COAs with
    >>>> Windows versions. The only exception here is that when you
    >>>> install the OEM version on the name brand computer, the install
    >>>> does not even ask for a COA product key, instead using one baked
    >>>> onto the CD... Ben Myers
    >>>
    >>>Hmm... I also have access to the OEM Generic CDs (MS Partner Program
    >>>Action
    >>>Pack). Anyway, recently, my HD bit the dust on my Compaq Laptop
    >>>(originally
    >>>delivered with Compaq OEM XP Pro) and I used the generic OEM XP Pro CD to
    >>>reinstall, using my COA affixed to the laptop. I was prompted to enter it.
    >>>Afterward, my on-line activation failed with a "already been activated"
    >>>type
    >>>message and I was instructed to use the phone. I did. My phone activation
    >>>went fine (explained that I had changed the HD).
    >>>
    >>>But it did prompt me for a COA, on a Compaq.
    >>>
    >>>-Frank
    >>>

    >


  16. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    Servers are another world, different from desktop computers. Micro$oft
    controls the software more closely because it is more expensive. With most
    name brand computers, if the server motherboard fails, and a replacement is
    installed, it is possible to change the serial number on the replacement
    motherboard to match the original, thereby keeping the Windows license valid.
    Depending on the name brand in question, the serial number can be changed in the
    BIOS (Compaq and IBM) or via a free-standing bootable utility (Dell).

    The norm for name-brand OEM Windows desktop CDs is for the install software to
    check the motherboard BIOS signature (not serial number, which would present a
    horrendous management problem) to make sure it agrees with the brand name
    stamped on the CD (and embedded inside the data on the CD). So if you try to
    install, say, a Dell Windows XP CD on a non-Dell motherboard, the install fails.
    If you replace a name-brand motherboard (e.g. Dell, HPaq, IBM) with a generic or
    other brand of motherboard, up pops the product activation dialog box the first
    time you boot the system.

    Note that the above applies to Windows XP. The Windows 2000 Pro CD has zero
    cross-checking of motherboard BIOS signature versus anything on the CD itself. I
    predict that Vista will be even more restrictive than Windows XP in allowing
    swapout and replacement of system hardware. Are we ready for Linux yet?

    .... Ben Myers

    On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 22:23:36 +0100, "Jez T"
    wrote:

    >
    >> On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 18:30:24 +0100, "Jez T"
    >>
    >>>"EvilNem" wrote
    >>>> OEM editions are restricted to the hard drive they are supplied with
    >>>
    >>>No. OEM license is restricted to the machine it is supplied with, not just
    >>>the HDD. Which is why there's a sticker with the license key stuck to the
    >>>PC, not the HDD.

    >
    >"Ben Myers" wrote
    >>I disagree with such a blanket statement, because it does not take into
    >>account
    >> the distributor-reseller-customer relationship. As a reseller dealing
    >> with a
    >> distributor, my reseller is bound by contract with Micro$oft to sell an
    >> OEM copy
    >> of Windows with EITHER a motherboard or a hard drive, not a whole
    >> computer. Once
    >> I have installed Window$ on the computer, then and only then does it
    >> become part
    >> of the computer. The computer chassis anyway... Ben Myers

    >
    >If it helps - On HP servers, when you buy an OEM license of say Win2003 SBS,
    >then it is bound to the _serial_number_ of the server.
    >You can replace _any_ part on that server (very few parts on HP servers do
    >not have a replacement spare part), but the _serial_ number stays the same,
    >therefore the OEM license is still bound to the machine.
    >
    >I /think/ that when you get any HP supplied OEM Windows OS, it has a routine
    >in it that checks to make sure the serian number is valid. This is certainly
    >the case on Storage Servers (DL380G4 SS for instance), because you cannot
    >recover a Storage Server unless the serial number is correct, and if you
    >change the serial number on the systemboard (through BIOS), the OS will stop
    >working.
    >


  17. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    yet?
    Been ready for years!!
    Just waiting on the average joe to catch up and shuck the Microsoft coil!

    "Ben Myers" wrote in message
    news:v7rvk2pg5dnlq9lkppf0u842nvpq34mrgq@4ax.com...
    > Servers are another world, different from desktop computers. Micro$oft
    > controls the software more closely because it is more expensive. With
    > most
    > name brand computers, if the server motherboard fails, and a replacement
    > is
    > installed, it is possible to change the serial number on the replacement
    > motherboard to match the original, thereby keeping the Windows license
    > valid.
    > Depending on the name brand in question, the serial number can be changed
    > in the
    > BIOS (Compaq and IBM) or via a free-standing bootable utility (Dell).
    >
    > The norm for name-brand OEM Windows desktop CDs is for the install
    > software to
    > check the motherboard BIOS signature (not serial number, which would
    > present a
    > horrendous management problem) to make sure it agrees with the brand name
    > stamped on the CD (and embedded inside the data on the CD). So if you
    > try to
    > install, say, a Dell Windows XP CD on a non-Dell motherboard, the install
    > fails.
    > If you replace a name-brand motherboard (e.g. Dell, HPaq, IBM) with a
    > generic or
    > other brand of motherboard, up pops the product activation dialog box the
    > first
    > time you boot the system.
    >
    > Note that the above applies to Windows XP. The Windows 2000 Pro CD has
    > zero
    > cross-checking of motherboard BIOS signature versus anything on the CD
    > itself. I
    > predict that Vista will be even more restrictive than Windows XP in
    > allowing
    > swapout and replacement of system hardware. Are we ready for Linux yet?
    >
    > ... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 22:23:36 +0100, "Jez T"
    >
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 18:30:24 +0100, "Jez T"
    >>>
    >>>>"EvilNem" wrote
    >>>>> OEM editions are restricted to the hard drive they are supplied with
    >>>>
    >>>>No. OEM license is restricted to the machine it is supplied with, not
    >>>>just
    >>>>the HDD. Which is why there's a sticker with the license key stuck to
    >>>>the
    >>>>PC, not the HDD.

    >>
    >>"Ben Myers" wrote
    >>>I disagree with such a blanket statement, because it does not take into
    >>>account
    >>> the distributor-reseller-customer relationship. As a reseller dealing
    >>> with a
    >>> distributor, my reseller is bound by contract with Micro$oft to sell an
    >>> OEM copy
    >>> of Windows with EITHER a motherboard or a hard drive, not a whole
    >>> computer. Once
    >>> I have installed Window$ on the computer, then and only then does it
    >>> become part
    >>> of the computer. The computer chassis anyway... Ben Myers

    >>
    >>If it helps - On HP servers, when you buy an OEM license of say Win2003
    >>SBS,
    >>then it is bound to the _serial_number_ of the server.
    >>You can replace _any_ part on that server (very few parts on HP servers do
    >>not have a replacement spare part), but the _serial_ number stays the
    >>same,
    >>therefore the OEM license is still bound to the machine.
    >>
    >>I /think/ that when you get any HP supplied OEM Windows OS, it has a
    >>routine
    >>in it that checks to make sure the serian number is valid. This is
    >>certainly
    >>the case on Storage Servers (DL380G4 SS for instance), because you cannot
    >>recover a Storage Server unless the serial number is correct, and if you
    >>change the serial number on the systemboard (through BIOS), the OS will
    >>stop
    >>working.
    >>




  18. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    "Jez T" wrote in message
    news:454f7123$0$21497$ba620e4c@news.skynet.be...
    >
    > "EvilNem" wrote
    >> OEM editions are restricted to the hard drive they are supplied with

    >
    > No. OEM license is restricted to the machine it is supplied with, not just
    > the HDD. Which is why there's a sticker with the license key stuck to the
    > PC, not the HDD.


    So what part of the machine IS the system? It's a sum of parts.

    I would guess this would be whatever HP decides at the moment.



  19. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    "Jez T" wrote in message
    news:454f71b4$0$30054$ba620e4c@news.skynet.be...
    >
    > "Gonzo" wrote
    >>
    >> Vote with your wallet. That's how they will get the message.
    >>

    >
    > Hmmm... People are doing that. The message HP are getting right now is
    > "You're better than Dell"


    There is no real way to count home built system is there?

    If there was, HP and Dell would get a wake up call I would bet.




  20. Re: HP Refuses to provide XP installation CD

    Gonzo wrote:
    > "Jez T" wrote in message
    > news:454f79a7$0$21493$ba620e4c@news.skynet.be...


    [deleted]

    Just showing one of your more blatant misconceptions.

    > >> You may also have important documents, photos, movies on your system and
    > >> certain custom configurations that you need. And if your hard drive
    > >> crashes...
    > >>
    > >> A restore CD will **** this up!

    > >
    > > If you get this far, YOU have ****ed up. Backup your data.

    >
    > I do backup so no need to get insulting and make assenine assumptions.
    > Normal people do not backup ever day. And with an installation CD you can
    > cirumvent losing data that was added and changed between backups. I would
    > not expect you to understand this.


    Your hard drived *crashed*, remember? There *is* no "data that was
    added and changed between backups" which you can "cirumvent losing".

    If you meant that the drive did not *boot* anymore (and could not be
    made to boot anymore), then *say* so. Using the wrong terminology and
    then blaming your correspondents is rather silly.

    Anyway, it would be nice to hear from *informed* people whether the
    burn-your-own restore/recovery/ CD has a "repair" mode like
    the supplied-with-the-system one has. If so, your comment is false for a
    non-booting drive as well.

    [deleted]

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