I see few people talk about the fact that these connectors are no
rated to handle the power a laptop is capable of consuming. Durin
high-power sessions, for example, playing a DVD movie whil
recharging a battery, the connectors can get hot, leading t
premature failure of the solder joints, and even melting of th
plugs

The Radio Shack type M connector is not a good replacement. It has
2.1mm center pin. You want a 2.5mm center pin. Better yet, skip thes
oft-rated 2.5A/12V components for something more stout

http://www.alliedelec.com/Search/Pro...r&ID=&DESC=712

I used this jack on my Pavilion 5420L, and anytime I replace a jac
for someone. It's rated for 5A/12V which matches well with th
laptop's 120v transformer's rating of 3.1A/19V. I was able to dril
out the original socket hole and mount the plug to the board wit
wire. I chose a plug with a plastic case, and insulated the wires an
leads inside the plug with shrinkwrap and rubber tape. The purpose o
this is the long plug cap will break off in an impact instead o
damaging the socket or case, but the wires inside the plug will no
short with the extra insulation. My wife has destroyed three plu
caps in her wreckless handling of the unit (which was bought on th
cheap due to a broken OEM PCB plug)

Some units may not require soldering of all pads (most three-lea
power connectors have 6 pads, three on both sides of the board, fo
structural integrity), but typically each of the three must b
soldered SOMEWHERE. The socket shorts the center lead to the extr
lead when you retract the plug. When this short is broken (upo
inserting the plug), the laptop disconnects the battery from th
power bus