hp recovery dvd - Hewlett Packard

This is a discussion on hp recovery dvd - Hewlett Packard ; I said I would never purchase a proprietary computer, and just purchased a pavilion a1228x. I attempt to create the recovery dvd discs today and after finishing the first, the system says that there are errors on it and it ...

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  1. hp recovery dvd

    I said I would never purchase a proprietary computer, and just purchased a
    pavilion a1228x. I attempt to create the recovery dvd discs today and
    after finishing the first, the system says that there are errors on it and
    it has to be recreated. I put another disc in and start over. It makes the
    second and gives me a message saying that no more can be created. Thanks
    hp. I don't see any way the verify the dvds at this time. Any ideas?
    thanks



  2. Re: hp recovery dvd

    til wrote:
    > I said I would never purchase a proprietary computer, and just purchased a
    > pavilion a1228x. I attempt to create the recovery dvd discs today and
    > after finishing the first, the system says that there are errors on it and
    > it has to be recreated. I put another disc in and start over. It makes the
    > second and gives me a message saying that no more can be created. Thanks
    > hp. I don't see any way the verify the dvds at this time. Any ideas?
    > thanks
    >
    >



    Made the same mistake. I couldn't get anywhere with them. Just
    imagine if you bought a car from GM and they only allowed you
    the have the engine repaired twice after which you're compelled
    to buy a new one. :-)

    Well that's Microsoft OEM.

    --
    "ACK",
    Bill D.
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    " Now just look..... they're burning the `Porta-Potties' "
    ........ OPUS

  3. Re: hp recovery dvd

    If I were to lose my hard drive, which I eventually have on every computer I
    have owned, I have to be prepared for the possibility of having to install a
    generic version of xp. I have been reading on this group that it is
    possible. Hp should have supplied operating system discs with this
    computer, I paid enough.



  4. Re: hp recovery dvd

    I agree w/you. There support is also awful. I was lucky in that I had no
    prob. creating the revocery discs. But I have a friend who seems to be
    having that prob. She bought the pc in Sept. After I set it up I went to
    create a Recovery CD. I forgot it would take 12-13 CD's. Anyway it seemed to
    have created 1 disc just fine. And that was it. Now from time to time she is
    getting prompted to create recovery DVD's But when she tries the pc won't
    write to the disc. She has so much trouble that I don't have time to work on
    it daily. She also has a prob. w/OE not sending or recieving mail.
    But that seems to be a prob. w/Norton Inet. Sec. I'll get it fixed 1 day.




    "til" wrote in message news:dohn4t$mik$1@zook.lafn.org...
    > If I were to lose my hard drive, which I eventually have on every computer
    > I have owned, I have to be prepared for the possibility of having to
    > install a generic version of xp. I have been reading on this group that
    > it is possible. Hp should have supplied operating system discs with this
    > computer, I paid enough.
    >




  5. Re: hp recovery dvd

    "til" wrote in message news:dohn4t$mik$1@zook.lafn.org...
    > If I were to lose my hard drive, which I eventually have on every computer
    > I have owned, I have to be prepared for the possibility of having to
    > install a generic version of xp. I have been reading on this group that
    > it is possible. Hp should have supplied operating system discs with this
    > computer, I paid enough.


    til, I argues this here a few months back and was told there was nothing I
    could do and to just take it in the butt.

    You will have to pay about $60 or so for an OEM xp home version or do what
    Im doing and hold out for Vista but be prepared to pay big bucks for it and
    to be a betta testor of sorts for MS for free.

    On HPs web page they had me pay for an OS but I did not get a lousy $1
    installation CD to go with it. Even if you opt to shell out more bucks for
    the Pro version you STILL will not get a measly installation CD. Nothing
    you can do about it. The corporations own us.

    You could also buy a used older OS as long as it has the reg code for it.
    Im even holding on to my Win98 and WinMe commercial CDs just in case. I
    would hate to have to resort to those dinosaurs though.

    As a last resort you can switch to Linux and not pay a damn thing too anyone
    but that has it's pains and problems itself. I would download a few image
    ISO files of the newest distributions and burn them just for safekeeping
    (just in case.) Good luck with your decision whatever you decide.



  6. Re: hp recovery dvd

    til wrote:
    > If I were to lose my hard drive, which I eventually have on every
    > computer I have owned, I have to be prepared for the possibility of
    > having to install a generic version of xp. I have been reading on
    > this group that it is possible.


    Well, you do make backups, don't you? So one of your options is to
    make an image backup. Another is to make a disaster recovery backup. I
    use the latter. The software needed for that (in my case Dantz
    Retrospect Express) came with the USB hard-disk (in my case Maxtor)
    which I bought.

    So if you look into proper backup and (disaster) recovery procedures,
    you will find that you don't need install media.

  7. Re: hp recovery dvd


    "Frank Slootweg" wrote in message
    news:43ac7f81$0$74182$dbd43001@news.wanadoo.nl...
    > Well, you do make backups, don't you? So one of your options is to
    > make an image backup. Another is to make a disaster recovery backup. I
    > use the latter. The software needed for that (in my case Dantz
    > Retrospect Express) came with the USB hard-disk (in my case Maxtor)
    > which I bought.
    >
    > So if you look into proper backup and (disaster) recovery procedures,
    > you will find that you don't need install media.


    "disaster recovery backup" Do you mean by this, an image of the hp
    disaster recovery partition on my computer? And then run it with the
    recovery cd when needed. thanks



  8. Re: hp recovery dvd

    til wrote:
    >
    > "Frank Slootweg" wrote in message
    > news:43ac7f81$0$74182$dbd43001@news.wanadoo.nl...
    > > Well, you do make backups, don't you? So one of your options is to
    > > make an image backup. Another is to make a disaster recovery backup. I
    > > use the latter. The software needed for that (in my case Dantz
    > > Retrospect Express) came with the USB hard-disk (in my case Maxtor)
    > > which I bought.
    > >
    > > So if you look into proper backup and (disaster) recovery procedures,
    > > you will find that you don't need install media.

    >
    > "disaster recovery backup" Do you mean by this, an image of the hp
    > disaster recovery partition on my computer? And then run it with the
    > recovery cd when needed. thanks


    No, it does not work like that. There are (of course) different
    disaster recovery backup schemes. The second one I mentioned, with the
    Dantz Retrospect Express software, works as follows:

    - The software uses (the files of) your *installed* Windows version to
    make an ISO image of a bootable disaster recovery CD and makes a,
    customized, text file on how to use that disaster recovery CD.
    The advantage of this method is that the procedure uses *your*
    installed Windows version, i.e. there are no additional license
    issues. Theoretically the software could come *with* a CD with (part
    of) Windows on it, but then 1) there would be a license issue (i.e.
    Dantz would have to pay MS) and 2) the Windows version would probably
    be different from yours, with all associated problems.

    - You burn the ISO image to a CD with any normal CD-writer software. (I
    use Nero which came with my CD-writer.) And you print out the above
    mentioned text file with the disaster recovery instructions.

    - You use the Dantz Retrospect Express file-level backup software at
    least once to make a complete system backup (not neccessarily of
    *your* stuff, but of all the *system* stuff, i.e. all installed
    drivers, your normal file-level backup/recovery software, etc.).

    - You continue to use your system and continue to make file-level backup
    with your normal file-level backup software. (I use the backup
    software which comes with XP Professional, NTBackup.)

    - When disaster strikes, i.e. you can no longer boot/use your system
    for whatever reason, you:

    - Boot from the disaster recovery CD and use it to restore the/your
    minimal system to your hard-disk.

    - Use the minimal system to restore the Dantz file-level backup. You
    now have access to your file-level backup/restore software.

    - Use your file-level backup/restore software to restore your latest
    file-level backup(s).

    - Make a happy dance! :-)

    I find this setup easier than normal 'image backup'. Normal 'image
    backup' software doesn't make a *minimal* system, but makes an image on
    bootable CDs/DVDs of you *whole* system, or at least of your C:
    partition, which, for most users, *is* their whole system. I understand
    that modern 'smart' 'image backup' software does not copy the empty
    parts of your disk, but it still copies all of the used parts. For me,
    with only a CD-writer and a 30GB hard-disk, that's not practical.

    I hope this helps.

    Perhaps others can point you to other 'smart' backup mechanisms.

    If/when you respond again, please tell us which normal file-level
    backup software and medium (or media) you use.

  9. Re: hp recovery dvd


    "Frank Slootweg" wrote in message
    news:43ad2f1e$0$81599$dbd4f001@news.wanadoo.nl...
    > If/when you respond again, please tell us which normal file-level
    > backup software and medium (or media) you use.


    Frank, thanks for the great explanation. I have never owned a proprietary
    computer and my answer has always been a fresh installation of windows. For
    backup media, floppies, zip drive, and cd. I know, it is time consuming.
    Time to get a little more sophisticated. Have a great holiday.



  10. Re: hp recovery dvd

    til wrote:

    > I don't see any way the verify the [recovery] dvds
    > at this time. Any ideas?


    Well, you could try them on a machine in a store :-)
    You're facing a basic connundrum of backup. If you
    haven't ever restored a given backup, you have to
    assume it won't.

    But in addition to the other tips people have posted,
    here's another: does the OEM key (if any) for the
    machine work with generic XP install media? If so, and
    if MS hasn't made XP media uncopyable, you might
    be able to get a clone of someone elses XP CD for
    use as rebuild media. This tactic did work on mid- and
    late-1990s PCs.

    > I said I would never purchase a proprietary computer,
    > and just purchased a pavilion a1228x.


    I began building my own about the same time PC makers
    stopped including full-install media. I have helped other
    people buy branded PCs, and currently use the criterion:
    does it also support Linux? If so, that's usually an indication
    that drivers for all the chips & bits inside are separately
    available from the recovery media/partition, and that there
    is at least a small chance you'll be able to upgrade at the
    next major OS roll. Whether or not any current HP/Compaq
    PCs meet my criteria, I couldn't say.

    When a PC doesn't also run Linux, odds are high that at
    least one of the components has no Linux drivers, and as
    often as not, that component will turn out to have been
    custom-made for the PC brand, and you can't even get
    Win drivers from the supplier that actually built it. And if
    it's a chip, or just a VLSI cell inside a chip (e.g. audio),
    you may not even be able to shut it off and replace it with
    a real supportable card or bussed device.

    > I attempt to create the recovery dvd discs today and
    > after finishing the first, the system says that there are
    > errors on it and it has to be recreated. I put another disc
    > in and start over. It makes the second and gives me a
    > message saying that no more can be created.


    I had thought that nonsense was abandoned in 1988. Guess not.
    It wasn't MS doing it at the time, so perhaps they didn't learn.
    It's too late to try this on your PC, but I wonder if doing an
    image backup of the HDD would allow one to get around
    the recovery-build count. Re-image the HDD after each try,
    and see if it resets the count to zero.

    --
    Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.


  11. Re: hp recovery dvd

    As a rule, I have found that a "generic" retail XP CD will work with the product
    key affixed to a name brand computer. But a name brand manufacturer's "restore"
    CD (actually a Windows XP CD) will NOT work with a generic product key.

    Microsoft alleged Windows Genuine Advantage now catches the mismatches.
    "Alleged" because the only real advantage is Microsoft's, not yours or mine.

    For a name brand computer's product key, the Windows CD must be the original
    install CD, not an upgrade CD, and it must match the version of Windows on the
    sticker, either Home or Pro.

    I would be surprised if HP computers were any different in this regard than
    IBM's or Dell's. If they are different, this would be yet another reason not to
    buy an HP... Ben Myers

    On 25 Dec 2005 08:03:15 -0800, "rjn" wrote:

    >til wrote:
    >
    >> I don't see any way the verify the [recovery] dvds
    >> at this time. Any ideas?

    >
    >Well, you could try them on a machine in a store :-)
    >You're facing a basic connundrum of backup. If you
    >haven't ever restored a given backup, you have to
    >assume it won't.
    >
    >But in addition to the other tips people have posted,
    >here's another: does the OEM key (if any) for the
    >machine work with generic XP install media? If so, and
    >if MS hasn't made XP media uncopyable, you might
    >be able to get a clone of someone elses XP CD for
    >use as rebuild media. This tactic did work on mid- and
    >late-1990s PCs.
    >
    >> I said I would never purchase a proprietary computer,
    >> and just purchased a pavilion a1228x.

    >
    >I began building my own about the same time PC makers
    >stopped including full-install media. I have helped other
    >people buy branded PCs, and currently use the criterion:
    >does it also support Linux? If so, that's usually an indication
    >that drivers for all the chips & bits inside are separately
    >available from the recovery media/partition, and that there
    >is at least a small chance you'll be able to upgrade at the
    >next major OS roll. Whether or not any current HP/Compaq
    >PCs meet my criteria, I couldn't say.
    >
    >When a PC doesn't also run Linux, odds are high that at
    >least one of the components has no Linux drivers, and as
    >often as not, that component will turn out to have been
    >custom-made for the PC brand, and you can't even get
    >Win drivers from the supplier that actually built it. And if
    >it's a chip, or just a VLSI cell inside a chip (e.g. audio),
    >you may not even be able to shut it off and replace it with
    >a real supportable card or bussed device.
    >
    >> I attempt to create the recovery dvd discs today and
    >> after finishing the first, the system says that there are
    >> errors on it and it has to be recreated. I put another disc
    >> in and start over. It makes the second and gives me a
    >> message saying that no more can be created.

    >
    >I had thought that nonsense was abandoned in 1988. Guess not.
    >It wasn't MS doing it at the time, so perhaps they didn't learn.
    >It's too late to try this on your PC, but I wonder if doing an
    >image backup of the HDD would allow one to get around
    >the recovery-build count. Re-image the HDD after each try,
    >and see if it resets the count to zero.
    >
    >--
    >Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
    >http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    >NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
    >



  12. Re: hp recovery dvd

    I forgot to mention that in addition to a Windows XP Home or Pro CD, one also
    needs the drivers for all the chipsets in the computer. There is no clear bet
    that the required chipsets will be on an XP CD, which was mastered back in 2001
    or 2002 whilst the computer was designed and built after.

    HP generally does a worse than 3rd rate job of providing drivers on-line for its
    computers (Pavilions and Presarios), but the drivers can be found elsewhere. If
    the computer has an Intel processor, then it invariably needs Intel motherboard
    drivers, possibly an Intel Extreme Graphics drivers, and usually an Intel 10/100
    Pro Ethernet driver. Modem and audio drivers are also chipset specific.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 19:24:30 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    Myers) wrote:

    >As a rule, I have found that a "generic" retail XP CD will work with the product
    >key affixed to a name brand computer. But a name brand manufacturer's "restore"
    >CD (actually a Windows XP CD) will NOT work with a generic product key.
    >
    >Microsoft alleged Windows Genuine Advantage now catches the mismatches.
    >"Alleged" because the only real advantage is Microsoft's, not yours or mine.
    >
    >For a name brand computer's product key, the Windows CD must be the original
    >install CD, not an upgrade CD, and it must match the version of Windows on the
    >sticker, either Home or Pro.
    >
    >I would be surprised if HP computers were any different in this regard than
    >IBM's or Dell's. If they are different, this would be yet another reason not to
    >buy an HP... Ben Myers
    >
    >On 25 Dec 2005 08:03:15 -0800, "rjn" wrote:
    >
    >>til wrote:
    >>
    >>> I don't see any way the verify the [recovery] dvds
    >>> at this time. Any ideas?

    >>
    >>Well, you could try them on a machine in a store :-)
    >>You're facing a basic connundrum of backup. If you
    >>haven't ever restored a given backup, you have to
    >>assume it won't.
    >>
    >>But in addition to the other tips people have posted,
    >>here's another: does the OEM key (if any) for the
    >>machine work with generic XP install media? If so, and
    >>if MS hasn't made XP media uncopyable, you might
    >>be able to get a clone of someone elses XP CD for
    >>use as rebuild media. This tactic did work on mid- and
    >>late-1990s PCs.
    >>
    >>> I said I would never purchase a proprietary computer,
    >>> and just purchased a pavilion a1228x.

    >>
    >>I began building my own about the same time PC makers
    >>stopped including full-install media. I have helped other
    >>people buy branded PCs, and currently use the criterion:
    >>does it also support Linux? If so, that's usually an indication
    >>that drivers for all the chips & bits inside are separately
    >>available from the recovery media/partition, and that there
    >>is at least a small chance you'll be able to upgrade at the
    >>next major OS roll. Whether or not any current HP/Compaq
    >>PCs meet my criteria, I couldn't say.
    >>
    >>When a PC doesn't also run Linux, odds are high that at
    >>least one of the components has no Linux drivers, and as
    >>often as not, that component will turn out to have been
    >>custom-made for the PC brand, and you can't even get
    >>Win drivers from the supplier that actually built it. And if
    >>it's a chip, or just a VLSI cell inside a chip (e.g. audio),
    >>you may not even be able to shut it off and replace it with
    >>a real supportable card or bussed device.
    >>
    >>> I attempt to create the recovery dvd discs today and
    >>> after finishing the first, the system says that there are
    >>> errors on it and it has to be recreated. I put another disc
    >>> in and start over. It makes the second and gives me a
    >>> message saying that no more can be created.

    >>
    >>I had thought that nonsense was abandoned in 1988. Guess not.
    >>It wasn't MS doing it at the time, so perhaps they didn't learn.
    >>It's too late to try this on your PC, but I wonder if doing an
    >>image backup of the HDD would allow one to get around
    >>the recovery-build count. Re-image the HDD after each try,
    >>and see if it resets the count to zero.
    >>
    >>--
    >>Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
    >>http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    >>NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
    >>

    >



  13. Re: hp recovery dvd

    Ben Myers wrote:
    > I forgot to mention that in addition to a Windows XP Home or Pro CD, one also
    > needs the drivers for all the chipsets in the computer. There is no clear bet
    > that the required chipsets will be on an XP CD, which was mastered back in 2001
    > or 2002 whilst the computer was designed and built after.
    >
    > HP generally does a worse than 3rd rate job of providing drivers on-line for its
    > computers (Pavilions and Presarios), but the drivers can be found elsewhere. If
    > the computer has an Intel processor, then it invariably needs Intel motherboard
    > drivers, possibly an Intel Extreme Graphics drivers, and usually an Intel 10/100
    > Pro Ethernet driver. Modem and audio drivers are also chipset specific.
    >
    > ... Ben Myers
    >


    In this case, all the drivers for the motherboard can be found on the hP
    site.

  14. Re: hp recovery dvd

    All???? Hardly.

    The board uses the ATI Radeon XPress 200 chipset, PCI K56flex data/fax modem,
    Realtek integrated AC97 audio, Realtek 8101L 10/100 Ethernet, Serial ATA.

    Only the RealTek AC97 audio drivers are on the HP web site.

    The K56flex data/fax modem drivers are likely on the XP install CD.

    The Realtek 8101L Ethernet drivers may or may not be on the XP install CD. The
    drivers would be there if the Realtek 10/100 chip is about 4 years old.

    For the rest, owners of Hp systems are left to scramble if they do not have all
    the CDs from HP. The ATI Radeon motherboard and graphics drivers and Serial ATA
    drivers would have to be obtained elsewhere, probably from the Asus web site.

    It is not clear whether the 160GB hard drive shipped with the system is older
    ATA100/133 or SATA, because the info on the web site is typically vague. And
    this is the typical example of how HP leaves its customers empty handed when it
    comes to drivers.

    Sorry, craigm, but the facts contradict your statement... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 17:42:48 -0600, craigm wrote:

    >Ben Myers wrote:
    >> I forgot to mention that in addition to a Windows XP Home or Pro CD, one also
    >> needs the drivers for all the chipsets in the computer. There is no clear bet
    >> that the required chipsets will be on an XP CD, which was mastered back in 2001
    >> or 2002 whilst the computer was designed and built after.
    >>
    >> HP generally does a worse than 3rd rate job of providing drivers on-line for its
    >> computers (Pavilions and Presarios), but the drivers can be found elsewhere. If
    >> the computer has an Intel processor, then it invariably needs Intel motherboard
    >> drivers, possibly an Intel Extreme Graphics drivers, and usually an Intel 10/100
    >> Pro Ethernet driver. Modem and audio drivers are also chipset specific.
    >>
    >> ... Ben Myers
    >>

    >
    >In this case, all the drivers for the motherboard can be found on the hP
    >site.



  15. Re: hp recovery dvd

    Ben Myers wrote:
    > All???? Hardly.
    >
    > The board uses the ATI Radeon XPress 200 chipset, PCI K56flex data/fax modem,
    > Realtek integrated AC97 audio, Realtek 8101L 10/100 Ethernet, Serial ATA.
    >
    > Only the RealTek AC97 audio drivers are on the HP web site.
    >
    > The K56flex data/fax modem drivers are likely on the XP install CD.
    >
    > The Realtek 8101L Ethernet drivers may or may not be on the XP install CD. The
    > drivers would be there if the Realtek 10/100 chip is about 4 years old.
    >
    > For the rest, owners of Hp systems are left to scramble if they do not have all
    > the CDs from HP. The ATI Radeon motherboard and graphics drivers and Serial ATA
    > drivers would have to be obtained elsewhere, probably from the Asus web site.
    >
    > It is not clear whether the 160GB hard drive shipped with the system is older
    > ATA100/133 or SATA, because the info on the web site is typically vague. And
    > this is the typical example of how HP leaves its customers empty handed when it
    > comes to drivers.
    >
    > Sorry, craigm, but the facts contradict your statement... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 17:42:48 -0600, craigm wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Ben Myers wrote:
    >>
    >>>I forgot to mention that in addition to a Windows XP Home or Pro CD, one also
    >>>needs the drivers for all the chipsets in the computer. There is no clear bet
    >>>that the required chipsets will be on an XP CD, which was mastered back in 2001
    >>>or 2002 whilst the computer was designed and built after.
    >>>
    >>>HP generally does a worse than 3rd rate job of providing drivers on-line for its
    >>>computers (Pavilions and Presarios), but the drivers can be found elsewhere. If
    >>>the computer has an Intel processor, then it invariably needs Intel motherboard
    >>>drivers, possibly an Intel Extreme Graphics drivers, and usually an Intel 10/100
    >>>Pro Ethernet driver. Modem and audio drivers are also chipset specific.
    >>>
    >>>... Ben Myers
    >>>

    >>
    >>In this case, all the drivers for the motherboard can be found on the hP
    >>site.

    >
    >




    Start here, some updates including the BIOS
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/s...n&cc=us&os=228

    Then go here and identify the mother board
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/d...name=c00496280

    Knowing the mother board, look up other mothels with the same
    motherboard. For example:

    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/d...name=c00461460

    Then look at it's driver collection

    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/s...n&cc=us&os=228

    Scroll down to find the Original drivers.




  16. Re: hp recovery dvd

    ben_myers_spam_me_not wrote:
    > I forgot to mention that in addition to a Windows XP Home or Pro CD,
    > one also needs the drivers for all the chipsets in the computer.
    > There is no clear bet that the required chipsets will be on an XP CD,
    > which was mastered back in 2001 or 2002 whilst the computer was
    > designed and built after.
    >
    > HP generally does a worse than 3rd rate job of providing drivers
    > on-line for its computers (Pavilions and Presarios), but the drivers
    > can be found elsewhere. If the computer has an Intel processor, then
    > it invariably needs Intel motherboard drivers, possibly an Intel
    > Extreme Graphics drivers, and usually an Intel 10/100 Pro Ethernet
    > driver. Modem and audio drivers are also chipset specific.
    >
    > ... Ben Myers


    Isn't it a tad hard to get drivers on-line when your system is down?

    In order to get drivers on-line (when their system is down) they need
    help from *other* people (with things like CD-burners).

    Instead of waiting for disaster to strike, these people *could* make a
    thing called "backup" (and *you* could advise them to do so). Then they
    wouldn't have these problems in the first place and you wouldn't 'have'
    to whine about 'missing' software all the time.

    > On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 19:24:30 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    > Myers) wrote:
    >
    > >As a rule, I have found that a "generic" retail XP CD will work with the product
    > >key affixed to a name brand computer. But a name brand manufacturer's "restore"
    > >CD (actually a Windows XP CD) will NOT work with a generic product key.
    > >
    > >Microsoft alleged Windows Genuine Advantage now catches the mismatches.
    > >"Alleged" because the only real advantage is Microsoft's, not yours or mine.
    > >
    > >For a name brand computer's product key, the Windows CD must be the original
    > >install CD, not an upgrade CD, and it must match the version of Windows on the
    > >sticker, either Home or Pro.
    > >
    > >I would be surprised if HP computers were any different in this regard than
    > >IBM's or Dell's. If they are different, this would be yet another reason not to
    > >buy an HP... Ben Myers
    > >
    > >On 25 Dec 2005 08:03:15 -0800, "rjn" wrote:
    > >
    > >>til wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I don't see any way the verify the [recovery] dvds
    > >>> at this time. Any ideas?
    > >>
    > >>Well, you could try them on a machine in a store :-)
    > >>You're facing a basic connundrum of backup. If you
    > >>haven't ever restored a given backup, you have to
    > >>assume it won't.
    > >>
    > >>But in addition to the other tips people have posted,
    > >>here's another: does the OEM key (if any) for the
    > >>machine work with generic XP install media? If so, and
    > >>if MS hasn't made XP media uncopyable, you might
    > >>be able to get a clone of someone elses XP CD for
    > >>use as rebuild media. This tactic did work on mid- and
    > >>late-1990s PCs.
    > >>
    > >>> I said I would never purchase a proprietary computer,
    > >>> and just purchased a pavilion a1228x.
    > >>
    > >>I began building my own about the same time PC makers
    > >>stopped including full-install media. I have helped other
    > >>people buy branded PCs, and currently use the criterion:
    > >>does it also support Linux? If so, that's usually an indication
    > >>that drivers for all the chips & bits inside are separately
    > >>available from the recovery media/partition, and that there
    > >>is at least a small chance you'll be able to upgrade at the
    > >>next major OS roll. Whether or not any current HP/Compaq
    > >>PCs meet my criteria, I couldn't say.
    > >>
    > >>When a PC doesn't also run Linux, odds are high that at
    > >>least one of the components has no Linux drivers, and as
    > >>often as not, that component will turn out to have been
    > >>custom-made for the PC brand, and you can't even get
    > >>Win drivers from the supplier that actually built it. And if
    > >>it's a chip, or just a VLSI cell inside a chip (e.g. audio),
    > >>you may not even be able to shut it off and replace it with
    > >>a real supportable card or bussed device.
    > >>
    > >>> I attempt to create the recovery dvd discs today and
    > >>> after finishing the first, the system says that there are
    > >>> errors on it and it has to be recreated. I put another disc
    > >>> in and start over. It makes the second and gives me a
    > >>> message saying that no more can be created.
    > >>
    > >>I had thought that nonsense was abandoned in 1988. Guess not.
    > >>It wasn't MS doing it at the time, so perhaps they didn't learn.
    > >>It's too late to try this on your PC, but I wonder if doing an
    > >>image backup of the HDD would allow one to get around
    > >>the recovery-build count. Re-image the HDD after each try,
    > >>and see if it resets the count to zero.
    > >>
    > >>--
    > >>Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
    > >>http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    > >>NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.


  17. Re: hp recovery dvd

    Certainly a bit convoluted. I would expect to enter the computer type and model
    (pavilion a1228x), and go to Software and Driver Downloads on the HP web site,
    then find it all. Repeat: ALL !

    Instead, one finds the Realtek audio driver, HP multimedia keyboard/mouse
    driver, BIOS Update (not required for system recovery), various bits multimedia
    software, and the PC Doctor utilities. Certainly everything that is there is
    useful in restoring a system to its original as-delivered state (except the BIOS
    update, of course). But it is incomplete.

    No motherboard chipset drivers, no graphics drivers, no SATA drivers.

    I'll claim that your diligence is well beyond the patience of the usual person
    wanting to get the drivers, and that HP still needs to think long and hard about
    organizing its web site to make this stuff easy to find. There is no need for
    people to go navigating all over the HP web site, making the associations among
    models and motherboards as you have. I sure as hell do not have the patience to
    poke and prod around. Of course, what you have found is infinitely better than
    the drivers which are/were on the HP web site for the older Pavilions, so HP has
    made some progress. But HP is still way behind the other name brand
    manufacturers (Dell, IBM/Lenovo, Gateway) in ease of use of web site, quantity
    and quality of technical info on its web site, and availability of drivers.

    I service all of the above name brands and darn near any other computer, and I
    am vendor-neutral. To a point. But when a vendor makes it difficult to service
    its computers, I generally speak up, as I have been doing re. HP computers for a
    number of years... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 21:45:09 -0600, craigm wrote:

    >Ben Myers wrote:
    >> All???? Hardly.
    >>
    >> The board uses the ATI Radeon XPress 200 chipset, PCI K56flex data/fax modem,
    >> Realtek integrated AC97 audio, Realtek 8101L 10/100 Ethernet, Serial ATA.
    >>
    >> Only the RealTek AC97 audio drivers are on the HP web site.
    >>
    >> The K56flex data/fax modem drivers are likely on the XP install CD.
    >>
    >> The Realtek 8101L Ethernet drivers may or may not be on the XP install CD. The
    >> drivers would be there if the Realtek 10/100 chip is about 4 years old.
    >>
    >> For the rest, owners of Hp systems are left to scramble if they do not have all
    >> the CDs from HP. The ATI Radeon motherboard and graphics drivers and Serial ATA
    >> drivers would have to be obtained elsewhere, probably from the Asus web site.
    >>
    >> It is not clear whether the 160GB hard drive shipped with the system is older
    >> ATA100/133 or SATA, because the info on the web site is typically vague. And
    >> this is the typical example of how HP leaves its customers empty handed when it
    >> comes to drivers.
    >>
    >> Sorry, craigm, but the facts contradict your statement... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Sun, 25 Dec 2005 17:42:48 -0600, craigm wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Ben Myers wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I forgot to mention that in addition to a Windows XP Home or Pro CD, one also
    >>>>needs the drivers for all the chipsets in the computer. There is no clear bet
    >>>>that the required chipsets will be on an XP CD, which was mastered back in 2001
    >>>>or 2002 whilst the computer was designed and built after.
    >>>>
    >>>>HP generally does a worse than 3rd rate job of providing drivers on-line for its
    >>>>computers (Pavilions and Presarios), but the drivers can be found elsewhere. If
    >>>>the computer has an Intel processor, then it invariably needs Intel motherboard
    >>>>drivers, possibly an Intel Extreme Graphics drivers, and usually an Intel 10/100
    >>>>Pro Ethernet driver. Modem and audio drivers are also chipset specific.
    >>>>
    >>>>... Ben Myers
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>In this case, all the drivers for the motherboard can be found on the hP
    >>>site.

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >Start here, some updates including the BIOS
    >http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/s...n&cc=us&os=228
    >
    >Then go here and identify the mother board
    >http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/d...name=c00496280
    >
    >Knowing the mother board, look up other mothels with the same
    >motherboard. For example:
    >
    >http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/d...name=c00461460
    >
    >Then look at it's driver collection
    >
    >http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/s...n&cc=us&os=228
    >
    >Scroll down to find the Original drivers.
    >
    >
    >



  18. Re: hp recovery dvd

    You've done a nice job advising people to make backups. I do the same when I
    deal with clients locally, and manage to sell both hardware and services to
    train people to do backups of DATA. The cost of backing up an entire system
    including OS software and drivers is usually beyond what people want to spend.
    So I take the approach that computer owners have to treat the OS restore CD and
    other CDs delivered with the system as valuable, keeping them safe and secure
    until needed.

    The modern trend is to deliver computers without the necessary CDs to restore a
    system to its original as-delivered factory state. This leaves people in a
    quandry as to what they need to do. Best thing is to ring up the manufacturer
    and ask for (pay for, if necessary, but only a smallish amount) the CDs.

    Some people, no matter what one tells them, do not take the necessary
    precautions to secure valuable software and data. I see many of them, when
    someone brings in a failed computer and asks me to get it running again. And,
    oh, yes, they threw out the CDs that came with the system. Fortunately, I can
    find drivers for just about any computer worth fixing, but companies like HP
    sure do not make the process easy.

    You may think that I am whining. I am simply stating facts. People can deal
    with the facts once they have them.

    I think we are both on the same side, advocating better use of computers. We
    just see things differently... Ben Myers

    On 26 Dec 2005 11:25:40 GMT, Frank Slootweg wrote:

    >ben_myers_spam_me_not wrote:
    >> I forgot to mention that in addition to a Windows XP Home or Pro CD,
    >> one also needs the drivers for all the chipsets in the computer.
    >> There is no clear bet that the required chipsets will be on an XP CD,
    >> which was mastered back in 2001 or 2002 whilst the computer was
    >> designed and built after.
    >>
    >> HP generally does a worse than 3rd rate job of providing drivers
    >> on-line for its computers (Pavilions and Presarios), but the drivers
    >> can be found elsewhere. If the computer has an Intel processor, then
    >> it invariably needs Intel motherboard drivers, possibly an Intel
    >> Extreme Graphics drivers, and usually an Intel 10/100 Pro Ethernet
    >> driver. Modem and audio drivers are also chipset specific.
    >>
    >> ... Ben Myers

    >
    > Isn't it a tad hard to get drivers on-line when your system is down?
    >
    > In order to get drivers on-line (when their system is down) they need
    >help from *other* people (with things like CD-burners).
    >
    > Instead of waiting for disaster to strike, these people *could* make a
    >thing called "backup" (and *you* could advise them to do so). Then they
    >wouldn't have these problems in the first place and you wouldn't 'have'
    >to whine about 'missing' software all the time.
    >



  19. Re: hp recovery dvd

    I checked the hp website and the hp recovery dvd, for my computer, is not
    orderable.
    (pavillion a1228x)

    http://h20141.www2.hp.com/hpparts/Se...8N921A9L2TBSWF



  20. Re: hp recovery dvd

    Sorry, the link didn't work directly to the search results. You have to
    follow the search procedure to get the results. The recovery dvd is NOT
    orderable for the pavillion a1228x.

    "til" wrote in message news:dopdpi$anv$1@zook.lafn.org...
    >I checked the hp website and the hp recovery dvd, for my computer, is not
    >orderable.
    > (pavillion a1228x)
    >
    > http://h20141.www2.hp.com/hpparts/Se...8N921A9L2TBSWF
    >
    >




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