Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister - Hewlett Packard

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Thread: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

  1. Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    What are today's wireless home network printing today?

    I wish to give my sister in Texas a gift by buying online (probably at
    www.costco.com) a printer and having it shipped to her. She has a laptop
    with a D-Link or Linksys (I forget which) wireless PCMCIA card and wireless
    router (with four wired ethernet ports) from CostCo of years past that I
    gave her, hooked to her incoming cable feed.

    Assuming the printer will remain stationary but the laptop PC will be used
    with encryption around house - are these our printer options?

    1. Buy a fully wireless networked printer and set it up anywhere in the
    house sans wires (excluding the power cord). Then print to it via the
    laptop PCMCIA wireless card.

    2. Buy an ethernet wired network printer and set it up next to the existing
    wireless router via a cat5 ethernet cable to one of the wired ports on the
    wireless router.

    3. Buy a USB printer (no innate network capability) and buy a special box
    (dunno what it is called) that converts ethernet to USB so that she can
    print to that special box via the laptop PCMCIA wireless card and that
    special box will convert the signal to USB into the printer.

    Are these our basic options today (assuming CostCo 300 to 500 dollar
    printers)?

    Tony Susa

  2. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    >
    > 2. Buy an ethernet wired network printer and set it up next to the existing
    > wireless router via a cat5 ethernet cable to one of the wired ports on the
    > wireless router.
    >
    >


    Do that one and be done with it.

    Duane

  3. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister


    One other thing, you should keep it simple as your sister might hate you and
    spit in your face in the long run for this if it's to complicated or
    toublesome.

    Duane



  4. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2005 03:00:45 GMT, Anthony Susa
    wrote:

    >What are today's wireless home network printing today?


    The only time I would recommend wireless printers is if running the
    CAT5 cable is impossible. In general, wired connections are better,
    faster, more reliable, less trouble, and easier to setup than
    wireless.

    >I wish to give my sister in Texas a gift by buying online (probably at
    >www.costco.com) a printer and having it shipped to her. She has a laptop
    >with a D-Link or Linksys (I forget which) wireless PCMCIA card and wireless
    >router (with four wired ethernet ports) from CostCo of years past that I
    >gave her, hooked to her incoming cable feed.
    >
    >Assuming the printer will remain stationary but the laptop PC will be used
    >with encryption around house - are these our printer options?
    >
    >1. Buy a fully wireless networked printer and set it up anywhere in the
    >house sans wires (excluding the power cord). Then print to it via the
    >laptop PCMCIA wireless card.


    Yeah, that will work. I setup an HP 5850 wireless injet printer a few
    weeks ago. The customer had given up due to the complexities of the
    installation and dragged me in to do the job. It took a while to
    figure out and get it working. Of course, they had a 2.4Ghz cordless
    phone next to the printer. When the phone was active, the printer
    would disconnect and stay disconnected for about 3 minutes until after
    the call was done. I could tell from the huge blue LED on the top
    that it had switched from wireless connectivity to ethernet wired
    connectivity and took its time going back to wireless. I eventually
    arranged the access point, printer, and cordless phone in a
    configuration that would not cause disconnects.

    Incidentally, some wireless printers call themselves "Print servers".
    This is not exactly true. It's actually a "print client" in that the
    wireless part of the printer connects to the wireless access point. In
    this mode (infrstructure) printing is done from the laptop to the
    access point and then to the printer, not directly.

    The HP 5850 has the ability to go directly from the laptop to the
    printer using the ad-hoc mode. That works nicely but causes a big
    problem. Her laptop cannot simultaneously be in infrastructure mode
    so that it can browse the internet, and in ad-hoc mode so it can
    print. It's one or the other, one at a time.

    Since the HP 5850 has both a wireless and a wired ethernet connection,
    one would presume that both can be connected simultaneously to an
    access point or computer. Nope. It's one at a time with only one IP
    address for the machine (not one for each interface).

    >2. Buy an ethernet wired network printer and set it up next to the existing
    >wireless router via a cat5 ethernet cable to one of the wired ports on the
    >wireless router.


    That would be what I would recommend. Note that there are external
    print servers that talk to USB printers that are usually cheaper than
    the built in ethernet adapters.

    >3. Buy a USB printer (no innate network capability) and buy a special box
    >(dunno what it is called) that converts ethernet to USB so that she can
    >print to that special box via the laptop PCMCIA wireless card and that
    >special box will convert the signal to USB into the printer.


    It's called a "USB Print Server". Watch out for multifunction
    printers that have fax, scanning, and printing, in one package. Many
    of them don't support all these functions over a network. With one of
    these, it's usually best to purchase the internal ethernet adapter
    that is made to work with the multifunction printer.

    Examples of some USB print servers:
    | http://www.netgear.com/products/details/PS101.php
    | http://www.netgear.com/products/details/PS121.php
    | http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satel...VisitorWrapper
    There are others...

    >Are these our basic options today (assuming CostCo 300 to 500 dollar
    >printers)?


    Other people have listed some other options. I don't know exactly
    what she will be doing with this printer. It could be photo quality
    or run as a printing press. The requirements are different. In large
    print quantities, a laser printer is more economical.


  5. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister


    "Anthony Susa" wrote in message
    news:1mjfoczi3sdlu$.tk3f1rna3h22$.dlg@40tude.net.. .
    > 1. Buy a fully wireless networked printer and set it up anywhere in the
    > house sans wires (excluding the power cord). Then print to it via the
    > laptop PCMCIA wireless card.
    >
    > 2. Buy an ethernet wired network printer and set it up next to the

    existing
    > wireless router via a cat5 ethernet cable to one of the wired ports on the
    > wireless router.


    The HP6840 comes with BOTH wireless and wired ports so it could do either 1.
    or 2.

    > 3. Buy a USB printer (no innate network capability) and buy a special box
    > (dunno what it is called) that converts ethernet to USB so that she can
    > print to that special box via the laptop PCMCIA wireless card and that
    > special box will convert the signal to USB into the printer.


    I don't recommend that. Many people report problems with third party printer
    servers. Frequently they will allow printing but won't send any status info
    back to the PCs (eg ink level monitoring or paper out doesn't work). If you
    go this route you need ti check that the printer server supports the printer
    AND how well it supports the printer (eg does it support the status info).




  6. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    Keep it simple, for your sake and for hers, especially if she has to set it all
    up herself.

    Netgear, Linksys, and others all make little boxes that make a printer into a
    network device. HP and Lexmark make them, too, but overpriced. If the printer
    is a USB printer, you need a box with USB on one side and Ethernet on the other.
    If the printer is a parallel printer, then you need a box with a 25-pin parallel
    connection and an Ethernet port. The modern ones are pretty easy to set up.
    (I've used a couple of Netgear Ethernet adapters for parallel port printers, and
    they work acceptably.)

    Of course, you could always spring for a printer with networking built-in (altho
    the cheap HP "networked" printers simply come with a little USB-Ethernet box).
    Networked printers are typically mid-range laser printers and higher quality
    inkjet printers, both sturdier business class devices with higher duty cycles.

    In any event, connect to the printer to the router with Ethernet cable. More
    relaible. Easier to troubleshoot. Easier to set up... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2005 03:00:45 GMT, Anthony Susa
    wrote:

    >What are today's wireless home network printing today?
    >
    >I wish to give my sister in Texas a gift by buying online (probably at
    >www.costco.com) a printer and having it shipped to her. She has a laptop
    >with a D-Link or Linksys (I forget which) wireless PCMCIA card and wireless
    >router (with four wired ethernet ports) from CostCo of years past that I
    >gave her, hooked to her incoming cable feed.
    >
    >Assuming the printer will remain stationary but the laptop PC will be used
    >with encryption around house - are these our printer options?
    >
    >1. Buy a fully wireless networked printer and set it up anywhere in the
    >house sans wires (excluding the power cord). Then print to it via the
    >laptop PCMCIA wireless card.
    >
    >2. Buy an ethernet wired network printer and set it up next to the existing
    >wireless router via a cat5 ethernet cable to one of the wired ports on the
    >wireless router.
    >
    >3. Buy a USB printer (no innate network capability) and buy a special box
    >(dunno what it is called) that converts ethernet to USB so that she can
    >print to that special box via the laptop PCMCIA wireless card and that
    >special box will convert the signal to USB into the printer.
    >
    >Are these our basic options today (assuming CostCo 300 to 500 dollar
    >printers)?
    >
    >Tony Susa



  7. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    On the seventh day, Anthony Susa wrote...

    > 2. Buy an ethernet wired network printer and set it up next to the existing
    > wireless router via a cat5 ethernet cable to one of the wired ports on the
    > wireless router.
    >
    > Are these our basic options today (assuming CostCo 300 to 500 dollar
    > printers)?


    go with option 2. It's the least troublesome solution.


    Flup2: comp.sys.hp.hardware

    --
    mit freundlichen Grüßen/with kind regards
    Christian Dürrhauer, Institute of Geography, FU Berlin

    "The knack of flying is learning how to throw yourself at the
    ground and miss."

  8. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    Duane Arnold wrote:
    > One other thing, you should keep it simple as your sister might hate
    > you and spit in your face in the long run for this if it's to
    > complicated or toublesome.
    >
    > Duane


    This is why your wired printer suggestion is the only one that the OP
    should select. Troubleshooting wireless and print servers is terribly
    difficult over the phone unless both parties have the required
    expertise.

    Q



  9. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2005 03:00:45 GMT, Anthony Susa
    wrote:

    >What are today's wireless home network printing today?
    >
    >I wish to give my sister in Texas a gift by buying online (probably at
    >www.costco.com) a printer and having it shipped to her. She has a laptop
    >with a D-Link or Linksys (I forget which) wireless PCMCIA card and wireless
    >router (with four wired ethernet ports) from CostCo of years past that I
    >gave her, hooked to her incoming cable feed.
    >
    >Assuming the printer will remain stationary but the laptop PC will be used
    >with encryption around house - are these our printer options?
    >
    >1. Buy a fully wireless networked printer and set it up anywhere in the
    >house sans wires (excluding the power cord). Then print to it via the
    >laptop PCMCIA wireless card.
    >
    >2. Buy an ethernet wired network printer and set it up next to the existing
    >wireless router via a cat5 ethernet cable to one of the wired ports on the
    >wireless router.
    >
    >3. Buy a USB printer (no innate network capability) and buy a special box
    >(dunno what it is called) that converts ethernet to USB so that she can
    >print to that special box via the laptop PCMCIA wireless card and that
    >special box will convert the signal to USB into the printer.
    >
    >Are these our basic options today (assuming CostCo 300 to 500 dollar
    >printers)?
    >
    >Tony Susa


    The printer we use was $80 but is now discontinued. It is a 5850. It
    has USB and ethernet wired and ethernet wireless.

    We use the wireless so the printer and the router don't have to be
    close together and no cables to run. It is only 802.11b but that is
    faster than the printer.

    We had to wire it for initial configuration and you just point a web
    browser to it. The wireless connection has been trouble free.

  10. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    In article <1134617533.953199.80620@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.c om>, "zakezuke" wrote:
    >If your looking for just a printer... i'd look at either the older
    >ip4000R which I don't see at costco, or the ip5200R which I also don't
    >see at costco. www.newegg.com would be a good place to shop.


    Buy.com has ip4000R for $150ish and $30 rebate if you pick up
    thei Visa card. It's a great printer. I have it in both USB and wireless
    modes and it works great. Fast, good quality, very easy to refill (one of
    the last Canon printers that are like this) and even text on plain paper
    is perfectly acceptable.

    Highly recommended.

    DK

  11. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    Anthony Susa wrote:

    > What are today's wireless home network printing today?
    >
    > I wish to give my sister in Texas a gift by buying online (probably at
    > www.costco.com) a printer and having it shipped to her. She has a laptop
    > with a D-Link or Linksys (I forget which) wireless PCMCIA card and wireless
    > router (with four wired ethernet ports) from CostCo of years past that I
    > gave her, hooked to her incoming cable feed.
    >
    > Assuming the printer will remain stationary but the laptop PC will be used
    > with encryption around house - are these our printer options?
    >
    > 1. Buy a fully wireless networked printer and set it up anywhere in the
    > house sans wires (excluding the power cord). Then print to it via the
    > laptop PCMCIA wireless card.
    >
    > 2. Buy an ethernet wired network printer and set it up next to the existing
    > wireless router via a cat5 ethernet cable to one of the wired ports on the
    > wireless router.
    >
    > 3. Buy a USB printer (no innate network capability) and buy a special box
    > (dunno what it is called) that converts ethernet to USB so that she can
    > print to that special box via the laptop PCMCIA wireless card and that
    > special box will convert the signal to USB into the printer.
    >
    > Are these our basic options today (assuming CostCo 300 to 500 dollar
    > printers)?
    >
    > Tony Susa


    Assuming that you want to get a color inkjet printer ...

    The hp 5850 mentioned by some of the other posters is no longer available.
    It's been replaced by the hp 6840, which until lists for $169 direct from hp +
    s/h (at least until this Saturday http://tinyurl.com/cqnsk). You can probably
    get it for slightly less at CompUSA, etc. I don't think Costco has it.

    This printer can be connected either by wireless b/g or by cat5 cable (but not
    both simultaneously) or usb. I have one at home which connects in wireless
    infrastructure mode to my Linksys wrt54g router and one in my wife's office to
    which she connects in wireless ad hoc mode. Setup of each was quite easy (and
    my wife -- who has almost zero interest in the details of computer technology
    -- easily uses the same laptop to print to both printers without the need to
    re-configure anything).

    However, if I were going to get one of these as a long-distance gift, I'd first
    download and read the user manual, network guide, and setup guide
    (http://tinyurl.com/bnvgj) so I could help with the setup over the phone.
    Between firewall settings (for anything other than the native WinXP SP2
    firewall) and encryption passwords, wireless setup can be daunting for the
    non-technical.

    If you get one of these printers, and opt to have it connected via wireless,
    you should know that (at least on mine) the setup "wizard" only allows you to
    setup WEP security, even though the printer supports WPA-AES. I found it
    easier -- for the infrastructure mode connection, where I wanted the highest
    possible security -- to set it up with no security and then use the printer's
    "embedded web server" to configure the security appropriately.

    I believe the 6840 is also the cheapest Ethernet-capable printer that hp
    sells. Thus, if you run into interference from 2.4gHz phones or microwave
    ovens, etc, use your option 2.

    As far as I'm aware, network adaptors for printers, either wireless to usb,
    ethernet to usb, or something like hp's plug-in JetDirect adapters, are in the
    $80 (and up, sometimes up a lot) range, so take that into consideration when
    pricing out your potential setup.


  12. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    > In responce to Anthony Susa


    I took the liberty of putting all the options quoted in this thread in
    one reply without any prejusice or features, only price if available
    and where to buy. They are grouped by mfg and in no particular order.

    HP 5850 - compusa -older model-
    hp 6840 http://tinyurl.com/cqnsk $169
    HP Photosmart 2610 AIO Costco $179
    Canon IP4000R $150-$180 Buy.com -older model-
    Canon IP5200R $210 newegg.com


  13. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister


    "Quaoar" wrote in message
    news:tbmdnakj-Mso6zzeRVn-iw@comcast.com...
    > Duane Arnold wrote:
    >> One other thing, you should keep it simple as your sister might hate
    >> you and spit in your face in the long run for this if it's to
    >> complicated or toublesome.
    >>
    >> Duane

    >
    > This is why your wired printer suggestion is the only one that the OP
    > should select. Troubleshooting wireless and print servers is terribly
    > difficult over the phone unless both parties have the required expertise.
    >
    > Q


    Yes, I know as I have been on the phone with family members too many times
    trying to fix computer problems. It's very painful at times when the person
    on the other end is non technical.

    Duane



  14. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister


    wrote in message
    news:43a1689d.1348120@nntp.charter.net...
    > Keep it simple, for your sake and for hers, especially if she has to set

    it all
    > up herself.
    >
    > Netgear, Linksys, and others all make little boxes that make a printer

    into a
    > network device. HP and Lexmark make them, too, but overpriced. If the

    printer
    > is a USB printer, you need a box with USB on one side and Ethernet on the

    other.
    > If the printer is a parallel printer, then you need a box with a 25-pin

    parallel
    > connection and an Ethernet port. The modern ones are pretty easy to set

    up.
    > (I've used a couple of Netgear Ethernet adapters for parallel port

    printers, and
    > they work acceptably.)


    If you go this route you need to check that the printer server not only
    supports the printer but also how WELL it supports the printer (eg does it
    support the ink status info?).



  15. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    Agreed. That's why it is generally best to match the brand of the print server
    with the brand of the computer. AFAIK, HP and Lexmark sell their own brand of
    print server. Don't know if Epson does. I don't see a lot of Epsons.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Fri, 16 Dec 2005 17:38:53 GMT, "CWatters"
    wrote:


    >
    >If you go this route you need to check that the printer server not only
    >supports the printer but also how WELL it supports the printer (eg does it
    >support the ink status info?).
    >
    >



  16. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    Of course, a relatively brain-dead but reliable old workhorse inkjet like a 612c
    does not provide ink status, so the brand of print server does not matter. Only
    the reliability is important... Ben Myers

    On Fri, 16 Dec 2005 19:02:19 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    Myers) wrote:

    >Agreed. That's why it is generally best to match the brand of the print server
    >with the brand of the computer. AFAIK, HP and Lexmark sell their own brand of
    >print server. Don't know if Epson does. I don't see a lot of Epsons.
    >
    >... Ben Myers
    >
    >On Fri, 16 Dec 2005 17:38:53 GMT, "CWatters"
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>If you go this route you need to check that the printer server not only
    >>supports the printer but also how WELL it supports the printer (eg does it
    >>support the ink status info?).
    >>
    >>

    >



  17. Re: Wireless network printing Christmas gift (CostCo) for my sister

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2005 04:34:29 +0000, Jeff Liebermann wrote
    (in article ):

    > Incidentally, some wireless printers call themselves "Print servers".
    > This is not exactly true. It's actually a "print client" in that the
    > wireless part of the printer connects to the wireless access point. In
    > this mode (infrstructure) printing is done from the laptop to the
    > access point and then to the printer, not directly.
    >
    > The HP 5850 has the ability to go directly from the laptop to the
    > printer using the ad-hoc mode. That works nicely but causes a big
    > problem. Her laptop cannot simultaneously be in infrastructure mode
    > so that it can browse the internet, and in ad-hoc mode so it can
    > print. It's one or the other, one at a time.


    of course, in infrastructure mode you can access internet while printing
    simultaneously, so this is the obvious solution. I have a wireless hp 1320 bw
    laser in one room which talks to my wireless access point in another
    flawlessly, as do all my computers/laptops about the house, so all can print
    and access the printer simultaneously by wireless (and I can drive music from
    any computer to three different sets of speakers in different rooms as well).


    so I would suggest option 1, provided the wireless network is managed.