HP Kayak XU Memory Errors. - Hewlett Packard

This is a discussion on HP Kayak XU Memory Errors. - Hewlett Packard ; Hi, I have a Kayak XU PII 450 Xeon workstation. It has 256 MB ECC SDRAM from Samsung at 133 MHz. A couple days ago my computer suddenly stopped booting. It had continous hard disk activity but there was no ...

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Thread: HP Kayak XU Memory Errors.

  1. HP Kayak XU Memory Errors.

    Hi,
    I have a Kayak XU PII 450 Xeon workstation. It has 256 MB ECC SDRAM
    from Samsung at 133 MHz. A couple days ago my computer suddenly stopped
    booting. It had continous hard disk activity but there was no display.
    I replaced my RAM stick with 128 MB 100 Mhz non-ECC stick (that I had
    at hand at the moment) and it started working properly again. Now my
    question is:
    how do I know whether the older RAM is at fault?
    Secondly if it is at fault what could have caused it and how can I be
    sure that if I replace it, the new RAM will not suffer from the same
    fate?
    How do I prevent such mishaps in future?
    And lastly how can I find out what maximum bus speed my computer
    supports?
    keeping in mind that I don't have access to the manuals of my computer
    (at the moment).

    Thanks.


  2. Re: HP Kayak XU Memory Errors.

    On the seventh day, haroon.shafiq@gmail.com wrote...

    > Hi,
    > I have a Kayak XU PII 450 Xeon workstation. It has 256 MB ECC SDRAM
    > from Samsung at 133 MHz. A couple days ago my computer suddenly stopped
    > booting. It had continous hard disk activity but there was no display.
    > I replaced my RAM stick with 128 MB 100 Mhz non-ECC stick (that I had
    > at hand at the moment) and it started working properly again. Now my
    > question is:
    > how do I know whether the older RAM is at fault?


    I would try the obvious: put it back in. I'd bet, it'll work again.
    A definitive answer is hard to get, but I guess, a 99,98% answer may be
    sufficient for you :-)

    > Secondly if it is at fault what could have caused it and how can I be
    > sure that if I replace it, the new RAM will not suffer from the same
    > fate?


    That once fully operational memory goes mad is not totally unheard of but
    quite frankly, I never saw something like this happen. I guess, the most
    possible solution to memory going mad is some kind of overcurrent as it
    happens in thunder storms. However, if your machine runs fine except for
    this memory module, I can think of another explanation: mechanical stress.
    I have a Visualize X550 (may be a XW7, also Xeon-based) and occasionally,
    it wouldn't have booted. It turned out to be the gfx card or the SCSI/LAN
    addon-card, which were once seated properly, but somehow moved enough to
    make the PC stop. That's why I'd suggest, you retest your bigger memory
    module another time and make sure, everythings seated and connected
    properly, even the module itself. BTW: the cards mustn't be completely
    pulled to the outside of the case, but rather a little bit to the inside.

    > How do I prevent such mishaps in future?


    an online-USV may be a start.

    > And lastly how can I find out what maximum bus speed my computer
    > supports?


    your workstation runs at a 100MHz bus speed (also called PC100).

    > keeping in mind that I don't have access to the manuals of my computer
    > (at the moment).


    HTH

    --
    mit freundlichen Grüßen/with kind regards
    Christian Dürrhauer, Institute of Geography, FU Berlin

    That and the table. - Troi, "Star Trek: The Next Generation,
    (The Emissary)"

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