linux for loaner computers to the masses? - Help

This is a discussion on linux for loaner computers to the masses? - Help ; Our little college group accepts donations of slightly outdated Intel-based computers, renovates them, and lends them out to old folks homes, battered womens' shelters, and homes for orphans. Maybe we will begin lending to individual poor kids soon. Obviously we ...

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  1. linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    Our little college group accepts donations of slightly outdated
    Intel-based computers, renovates them, and lends them out to old folks
    homes, battered womens' shelters, and homes for orphans. Maybe we will
    begin lending to individual poor kids soon.

    Obviously we can't afford the "other" OS. We would appreciate
    suggestions on which version of Linux to use and software appropriate
    for techno-peasants.

    The Linux should have a shell, like Windows and, of course, be
    rock-solid stable. It should have administrator-only control.

    We want to install a complete office suite, and a word processor (or
    suite) for those who cannot cope with too many features (sort of like
    MS Works). Also, a web browser. Some games would be nice.

    We are considering "Caldera OpenLinux 1.3 with the KDE Desktop and
    Star Office 4.0 because it comes with Idiot's Guide to Linux but I
    note the book was copywrited in 1998, which seems like a long, long
    time ago.

    Our collective skill level with Windows is intermediate. No experience
    with Linux.

    Thanks in advance!

    Note: Cross-posted to several Linux groups

  2. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    sue sanchez wrote:


    > Our collective skill level with Windows is intermediate. No experience
    > with Linux.
    >
    > Thanks in advance!
    >
    > Note: Cross-posted to several Linux groups


    Hi Sue,

    I think you should try to get at least 1 more experienced Linuxguy/gal
    involved in the project.
    Since you are working charity, I think it is possible because the
    Linuxpeople are all very nice and friendly.

    I think it is a little complicated to set up all those machines without any
    knowledge of Linux.
    Nowadays many Linuxes install very easy, but still you'll have to set up
    some things, like internet access, install Open Office (or Startoffice)

    It is not complicated, but if you are completely new....
    I hope you can find some local help.
    Maybe place an ad?

    Good luck,
    Erwin Moller



  3. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    Erwin Moller wrote:
    > sue sanchez wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>Our collective skill level with Windows is intermediate. No experience
    >>with Linux.
    >>
    >>Thanks in advance!
    >>
    >>Note: Cross-posted to several Linux groups

    >
    >
    > Hi Sue,
    >
    > I think you should try to get at least 1 more experienced Linuxguy/gal
    > involved in the project.
    > Since you are working charity, I think it is possible because the
    > Linuxpeople are all very nice and friendly.
    >
    > I think it is a little complicated to set up all those machines without any
    > knowledge of Linux.
    > Nowadays many Linuxes install very easy, but still you'll have to set up
    > some things, like internet access, install Open Office (or Startoffice)
    >
    > It is not complicated, but if you are completely new....
    > I hope you can find some local help.
    > Maybe place an ad?
    >
    > Good luck,
    > Erwin Moller
    >
    >

    Yep, besides, it is doubtful you can LEGALLY run Windows on PCs for poor
    kids.

    --
    ____ _ __ _
    | __ ) _ __ ___ __ _| | __ / _|_ __ ___ ___| |
    | _ \| '__/ _ \/ _` | |/ / | |_| '__/ _ \/ _ \ |
    | |_) | | | __/ (_| | < | _| | | __/ __/_|
    |____/|_| \___|\__,_|_|\_\ |_| |_| \___|\___(_)
    Freedom has no pricetag.

    Free software, get it now:

    Browser: . . . . . http://www.mozilla.org
    E-mail:. . . . . . http://www.mozilla.org
    Instant messenger: http://gaim.sf.net (MSN, AIM, ICQ, etc.)
    Media player:. . . http://www.mplayerhq.hu
    Office suite:. . . http://www.openoffice.org
    Operating system:. Debian GNU/Linux:. . http://www.debian.org
    Slackware GNU/Linux: http://www.slackware.org

    For more information, check out my site: http://7135.tk

  4. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 12:32:24 +0200, Erwin Moller
    wrote:

    >Nowadays many Linuxes install very easy, but still you'll have to set up
    >some things, like internet access, install Open Office (or Startoffice)


    Just a little, silly thought: what is, or at least should be, the
    proper pluralization for Linux? As you have one Vax two Vaxen, might
    it not be Linuxen? Would Linuxese be better? Enquiring minds want to
    know!

    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns
    But is it really useful for the city council to survive while the rest of
    the population is a glowing cloud drifting away in the 500MPH breeze?
    http://www.lasfs.org http://home.earthlink.net/~sidebrnz

  5. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    How about Linuci, as in vox, voci, etc. 2nd declension, I think,

    Joe Zeff wrote:

    > On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 12:32:24 +0200, Erwin Moller
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Nowadays many Linuxes install very easy, but still you'll have to set up
    >>some things, like internet access, install Open Office (or Startoffice)

    >
    >
    > Just a little, silly thought: what is, or at least should be, the
    > proper pluralization for Linux? As you have one Vax two Vaxen, might
    > it not be Linuxen? Would Linuxese be better? Enquiring minds want to
    > know!
    >



  6. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    You have the right idea leaving Bill behind. You are also very right
    in that 1998 is a long, long time ago in the Linux world.

    I recommend the Fedora Core distro - has OpenOffice, Mozilla, and other
    goodies built right into it. Fairly easy to install, too. You can buy
    one copy (4 CD set) and legally use that one set to set up all the PC's
    you want, no per seat licenses to worry about. You can buy it at
    cheapbytes.com, for $8.99. I would not recommend Slackware for novices
    though - pretty bare bones, really for old-school Linux hacker types.
    The "complete" distros usually have minimum system requirements,
    usually of the order of 500 MHz, 128 MB RAM, 3 or 4 MB disc space.

    The main thing you have to worry about is that while distros generally
    do a good job configuring themselves to video cards, hard drives, CD
    drives, etc. two components that seem to be very problematic are (1)
    sound cards, and (2) modems, though, oddly, network cards are generally
    not. Modems are particularly problematic since most of them are
    "Winmodems" set up to utilize certain utilities built into Windows -
    most internal PCI modems are of this type, and of course, these
    functions are lacking in Linux (Uncle Bill won't play nice and share his
    source code for those functions). I can't attest to this personally,
    but I read somewhere that external modems generally have better luck
    being configured under Linux. Maybe another reader can shed more light
    on this.

    sue sanchez wrote:

    > Our little college group accepts donations of slightly outdated
    > Intel-based computers, renovates them, and lends them out to old folks
    > homes, battered womens' shelters, and homes for orphans. Maybe we will
    > begin lending to individual poor kids soon.
    >
    > Obviously we can't afford the "other" OS. We would appreciate
    > suggestions on which version of Linux to use and software appropriate
    > for techno-peasants.
    >
    > The Linux should have a shell, like Windows and, of course, be
    > rock-solid stable. It should have administrator-only control.
    >
    > We want to install a complete office suite, and a word processor (or
    > suite) for those who cannot cope with too many features (sort of like
    > MS Works). Also, a web browser. Some games would be nice.
    >
    > We are considering "Caldera OpenLinux 1.3 with the KDE Desktop and
    > Star Office 4.0 because it comes with Idiot's Guide to Linux but I
    > note the book was copywrited in 1998, which seems like a long, long
    > time ago.
    >
    > Our collective skill level with Windows is intermediate. No experience
    > with Linux.
    >
    > Thanks in advance!
    >
    > Note: Cross-posted to several Linux groups



  7. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    I have replied to you via e-mail. Our volunteer group will help your
    volunteer group - downloading via our T1, and sending you the necessary
    CD-ROM packages set up for easy install, with telephone and e-mail support.

    Regards,

    Dave


    "sue sanchez" wrote in message
    news:78537861.0407151248.26a3b119@posting.google.c om...
    > Our little college group accepts donations of slightly outdated
    > Intel-based computers, renovates them, and lends them out to old folks
    > homes, battered womens' shelters, and homes for orphans. Maybe we will
    > begin lending to individual poor kids soon.
    >
    > Obviously we can't afford the "other" OS. We would appreciate
    > suggestions on which version of Linux to use and software appropriate
    > for techno-peasants.
    >
    > The Linux should have a shell, like Windows and, of course, be
    > rock-solid stable. It should have administrator-only control.
    >
    > We want to install a complete office suite, and a word processor (or
    > suite) for those who cannot cope with too many features (sort of like
    > MS Works). Also, a web browser. Some games would be nice.
    >
    > We are considering "Caldera OpenLinux 1.3 with the KDE Desktop and
    > Star Office 4.0 because it comes with Idiot's Guide to Linux but I
    > note the book was copywrited in 1998, which seems like a long, long
    > time ago.
    >
    > Our collective skill level with Windows is intermediate. No experience
    > with Linux.
    >
    > Thanks in advance!
    >
    > Note: Cross-posted to several Linux groups




  8. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    Thanks for all your thoughtful advice. I'm concerned that these newer
    releases may demand more system resources than our donated computers
    have.

    Suse recommeneds 256 MB of memory and Fedora 512 for a graphical
    interface.

    Memory is so cheap that if it were MY system, I wouldn't hestitate to
    buy 512 MB of memory but for these loaners, we are attempting to keep
    the costs down.

    Recently donated units are Pentium II-400, 128 MB with 10 GB HD.

    Would an older release be more suitable for these low-resource
    systems?

    note: multi-posted to several Linux groups

  9. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    I run Fedora on a PII, 333 MHz, with 128 MB RAM myself - a little slow,
    but it runs fine!

    sue sanchez wrote:
    > Thanks for all your thoughtful advice. I'm concerned that these newer
    > releases may demand more system resources than our donated computers
    > have.
    >
    > Suse recommeneds 256 MB of memory and Fedora 512 for a graphical
    > interface.
    >
    > Memory is so cheap that if it were MY system, I wouldn't hestitate to
    > buy 512 MB of memory but for these loaners, we are attempting to keep
    > the costs down.
    >
    > Recently donated units are Pentium II-400, 128 MB with 10 GB HD.
    >
    > Would an older release be more suitable for these low-resource
    > systems?
    >
    > note: multi-posted to several Linux groups



  10. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    Joe Zeff wrote:

    > On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 12:32:24 +0200, Erwin Moller
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Nowadays many Linuxes install very easy, but still you'll have to set up
    >>some things, like internet access, install Open Office (or Startoffice)

    >
    > Just a little, silly thought: what is, or at least should be, the
    > proper pluralization for Linux? As you have one Vax two Vaxen, might
    > it not be Linuxen? Would Linuxese be better? Enquiring minds want to
    > know!
    >


    Hee, I never gave it much thought to be honest.
    I am a curious guy, but not curious for languages.

    But in my humble opinion this planet drowns in too many languages.
    If I meet a Chinese (Chineese?? forgive me, I am not even native english) I
    cannot speak with him/her.
    We have too many languages.
    So I have this (childish) point-of-view: As long as we understand each
    other, why worry about the 'good' grammar and syntax?

    Anyway, what is the good pluralization of Linux?
    Did you find out?
    If so, let me know.

    Regards,
    Erwin Moller


  11. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    sue sanchez wrotre
    > your thoughtful advice. I'm concerned that these newer
    > releases may demand more system resources than our donated computers
    > have.
    >
    > Suse recommeneds 256 MB of memory and Fedora 512 for a graphical
    > interface.
    >
    > Memory is so cheap that if it were MY system, I wouldn't hestitate to
    > buy 512 MB of memory but for these loaners, we are attempting to keep
    > the costs down.
    >
    > Recently donated units are Pentium II-400, 128 MB with 10 GB HD.
    >
    > Would an older release be more suitable for these low-resource
    > systems?
    >
    > note: multi-posted to several Linux groups


    Personally, I'd recommend Debian Sarge (aka Debian Testing). Its somewhat
    up-to-date, but it offers lots of control as to what packages you want to
    install. This install can be tough, but its pretty straight-forward. I'd
    recommend installing fluxbox with desktop icons as your window manager (you
    can see how KDE or GNOME runs, though). I would not recommend OpenOffice -
    try AbiWord and Gnumeric instead. KDE and GNOME come with some assorted
    games - nothing great though.

  12. Re: linux for loaner computers to the masses?

    On Sun, 18 Jul 2004, sue sanchez wrote:
    > Thanks for all your thoughtful advice. I'm concerned that these newer
    > releases may demand more system resources than our donated computers
    > have.
    >
    > Suse recommeneds 256 MB of memory and Fedora 512 for a graphical
    > interface.


    why is Fedora such a resource hog? I tried swordfish, but it's too bare
    for me.

    [..]
    > Would an older release be more suitable for these low-resource
    > systems?


    has info on different releases FWIW.

    > note: multi-posted to several Linux groups


    why not just cross post?

    Thufir Hawat


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