what does this number on my login screen indicate? - Help

This is a discussion on what does this number on my login screen indicate? - Help ; when my cable modem is connected and working properly there's a number in the bottom right corner of the graphical login screen. the number's always the same and is along the lines of: "S453474337eiob3jkdl769887". If my connection's not working then ...

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  1. what does this number on my login screen indicate?

    when my cable modem is connected and working properly there's a number
    in the bottom right corner of the graphical login screen. the
    number's always the same and is along the lines of:
    "S453474337eiob3jkdl769887". If my connection's not working then
    it'll say "local host" or something similar, IIRC. I'm running Fedora
    core 1 and use the default login screen, FWIW.


    thanks,

    javac at mail dot com

  2. Re: what does this number on my login screen indicate?

    javac@mail.com (javac) writes:
    >
    > when my cable modem is connected and working properly there's a number
    > in the bottom right corner of the graphical login screen. the
    > number's always the same and is along the lines of:
    > "S453474337eiob3jkdl769887". If my connection's not working then
    > it'll say "local host" or something similar, IIRC. I'm running Fedora
    > core 1 and use the default login screen, FWIW.


    It's probably the hostname associated with your dynamically assigned
    IP address. For example, I notice from your headers that you posted
    from IP address 24.81.199.227. A lookup shows that the first
    component of the hostname looks something like what you've written
    above:

    $ host 24.81.199.227
    Name: S01060004e204a013.vc.shawcable.net
    Address: 24.81.199.227

    --
    Kevin

  3. Re: what does this number on my login screen indicate?

    Kevin Buhr wrote:
    > javac@mail.com (javac) writes:
    >
    >>when my cable modem is connected and working properly there's a number
    >>in the bottom right corner of the graphical login screen. the
    >>number's always the same and is along the lines of:
    >>"S453474337eiob3jkdl769887". If my connection's not working then
    >>it'll say "local host" or something similar, IIRC. I'm running Fedora
    >>core 1 and use the default login screen, FWIW.

    >
    >
    > It's probably the hostname associated with your dynamically assigned
    > IP address. For example, I notice from your headers that you posted
    > from IP address 24.81.199.227. A lookup shows that the first
    > component of the hostname looks something like what you've written
    > above:
    >
    > $ host 24.81.199.227
    > Name: S01060004e204a013.vc.shawcable.net
    > Address: 24.81.199.227
    >


    Does this mean the same as what my sign-in screen shows
    "localhost.localhost.com" ? I wanted to try to change that localhost
    thing to read the name of my computer something like "mycomputer"

    TIA for the advice.

    Dave


  4. Re: what does this number on my login screen indicate?

    Dave Mann writes:
    > Kevin Buhr wrote:
    >> It's probably the hostname associated with your dynamically assigned
    >> IP address.

    [ . . . ]
    > Does this mean the same as what my sign-in screen shows
    > "localhost.localhost.com" ? I wanted to try to change that localhost
    > thing to read the name of my computer something like "mycomputer"


    Possibly. The string "localhost.localhost.com" is probably coming
    from the file "/etc/hosts". If you look in your "/etc/hosts" file and
    see a line like:

    127.0.0.1 localhost.localhost.com localhost

    you can change it to (all one line):

    127.0.0.1 mycomputer.davemann.com mycomputer localhost.localhost.com localhost

    The change may take effect as soon as you log off, or you may need to
    restart your login screen process (maybe by hitting Ctrl-Alt-Backspace
    to reset the X server or, in the worst case, rebooting).

    The format of lines in "/etc/hosts" is an IP address followed by the
    "canonical" hostname followed by zero or more aliases.

    The way many machines are configured, the canonical name of the
    loopback address 127.0.0.1 will be your host's full name, and so
    "mycomputer.davemann.com" will be displayed on your login screen.

    As for aliases, you definitely want to include the alias "localhost",
    since that's standard, and you can include any other aliases you want,
    too. It's helpful to include the old "localhost.localhost.com" name
    as an alias in case some other services (like, say, local mail
    delivery) have been configured to expect that.

    Finally, be warned that any hostnames you stick in "/etc/hosts" will
    override normal hostname resolution. It might seem hilarious to set
    your canonical hostname to "www.google.com", but unless you're running
    a great web search engine on your own computer, you'll probably regret it.

    --
    Kevin

  5. Re: what does this number on my login screen indicate?

    In article <87acnqznw6.fsf@saurus.asaurus.invalid>, Kevin Buhr wrote:

    >Dave Mann writes:
    >> Kevin Buhr wrote:
    >>> It's probably the hostname associated with your dynamically assigned
    >>> IP address.

    >[ . . . ]
    >> Does this mean the same as what my sign-in screen shows
    >> "localhost.localhost.com" ? I wanted to try to change that localhost
    >> thing to read the name of my computer something like "mycomputer"

    >
    >Possibly. The string "localhost.localhost.com" is probably coming
    >from the file "/etc/hosts".


    Nope. 'man bash' for the stuff in the prompt _AFTER_ login. Before, the
    login, it comes from the app that is running (xdm, or /bin/login), and
    that is the system's idea of it's hostname. Find a command prompt, and
    type 'hostname'. For a system that is set up for static addressing at
    boot time, this is configured in the boot scripts (typically rc.sysinit
    in a SysV setup, rc.inet1 in a BSD style init). Where that script gets
    the data depends on the distribution. Red Hat clones get it from
    /etc/sysconfig/network, while others may use /etc/hostname, /etc/rc.conf
    or occasionally /etc/HOSTNAME. For a system using DHCP, the hostname
    _may_ be set by the DHCP client. A _dialin_ system doesn't get it's
    hostname set, unless you have a screwy configuration (kppp defaulted to
    changing the hostname for a while, till they realized how many other
    things that stupid idea broke).

    The file /etc/hosts is used solely to translate the hostname to an
    IP address, and occasionally vice-versa by applications like your
    mail daemon. The system's FULL hostname must either resolve via DNS,
    or be found in /etc/hosts pointing to some address.

    >The change may take effect as soon as you log off, or you may need to
    >restart your login screen process (maybe by hitting Ctrl-Alt-Backspace
    >to reset the X server or, in the worst case, rebooting).


    X doesn't like the hostname changing _while_ it's running. Thus, restarting
    the whole X server is a good idea. Actually, the basic operating sytem also
    need to know of the change, and the quick way around that is to use the
    '/bin/hostname' command to set what the kernel thinks the name is, and then
    restarting your X server and any other server applications that need to know
    the hostname (which means, just about all of them).

    >The way many machines are configured, the canonical name of the
    >loopback address 127.0.0.1 will be your host's full name, and so
    >"mycomputer.davemann.com" will be displayed on your login screen.


    That's generally the case if you don't have a network card installed. In
    fact, there is nothing that prevents you from setting the NIC-less system
    to a name other than localhost, but a good idea is to make that other
    name some address other than 127.0.0.1 which always must be 'localhost'.
    You can set the name to 'mycomputer.davemann.com' through the boot script
    configuration, but that hostname would go into /etc/hosts either as an
    alias for localhost, or as a separate entry for host 127.0.0.2 (up to
    127.255.255.254).

    >It's helpful to include the old "localhost.localhost.com" name
    >as an alias in case some other services (like, say, local mail
    >delivery) have been configured to expect that.


    The correct name is 'localhost.localdomain' - localhost.com has
    never been valid as a local name. Why? Well, maybe if you did a
    whois query, you'd find it registered to "Wraith Enterprises" whoever
    they are, in Austin TX.

    >Finally, be warned that any hostnames you stick in "/etc/hosts" will
    >override normal hostname resolution. It might seem hilarious to set
    >your canonical hostname to "www.google.com", but unless you're running
    >a great web search engine on your own computer, you'll probably regret it.


    Except that DNS query tools don't look in /etc/hosts, and the resolver can
    be set to ignore it too (check out /etc/host.conf and /etc/nsswitch.conf
    and their man pages). However, you are quite right about regretting it.
    Your computer won't be able to reach the real host with that name, and your
    ISP may get all grumpy about name spoofing if you haven't got your network
    applications set just so.

    Old guy


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