ALSA in Mandrake 9.2 - Help

This is a discussion on ALSA in Mandrake 9.2 - Help ; I'm running Mandrake 9.2 with the 2.4.22-10mdk kernel. By default, the system configured and ran with OSS and the i810_audio driver. Unfortunately, setting that to full duplex kills all sound, and I really need full duplex for webcam use. I've ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: ALSA in Mandrake 9.2

  1. ALSA in Mandrake 9.2

    I'm running Mandrake 9.2 with the 2.4.22-10mdk kernel. By default, the
    system configured and ran with OSS and the i810_audio driver.
    Unfortunately, setting that to full duplex kills all sound, and I really
    need full duplex for webcam use. I've been told that switching to ALSA
    will fix this problem.

    Here's what I've done:
    Using harddrake I've changed the soundcard's driver from i810_audio to
    snd-intel8x0.
    I've stopped the sound service.
    I've started the alsa service.

    This leaves me with no sound at all. I used modprobe to discover that
    i810_audio was still loaded, so I manually unloaded that and loaded
    snd-intel8x0, but it didn't help. Of course, I've been killing and
    restarting artsd throughout this process. Nothing seems to work...

    artsd by itself defaults to OSS, even when ALSA drivers are loaded. Using
    -a alsa puts it in ALSA mode, but it doesn't produce sound. Here's the
    output using -l0:

    $ artsd -a alsa -l0
    artsd version is 1.1.3
    gsl: using Unix98 pthreads directly for mutexes and conditions
    ALSA driver: default
    buffering: 7 fragments with 1024 bytes (audio latency is 40.6 ms)
    virtualize StereoVolumeControl
    ALSA driver: default
    buffering: 7 fragments with 1024 bytes (audio latency is 40.6 ms)
    audio format is 44100 Hz, 16 bits, 2 channels
    addDirectory(/usr/lib/mcop,)
    addDirectory(/usr/lib/mcop/Arts,Arts)
    addDirectory(/usr/lib/mcop/Arts/Environment,Arts::Environment)
    addDirectory(/home/[deleted]/.mcop/trader-cache,)
    unix_connect: can't connect to server
    (unix:/tmp/mcop-[deleted]/desktop-2e6c-40bfd2ee) Arts::MidiManager
    registered successfully. There are already artsd objects registered,
    looking if they are active... unix_connect: can't connect to server
    (unix:/tmp/mcop-[deleted]/desktop-2e6c-40bfd2ee) ... cleaned 5 unused
    mcop global references.

    unix_connect: can't connect to server
    (unix:/tmp/mcop-[deleted]/desktop-2e6c-40bfd2ee) (The previous message was
    repeated 4 times.) UnixManager: got notifyIO socketconnection created, fd
    = 8
    play '/usr/share/sounds/KDE_Startup.wav'! loaded wav
    /usr/share/sounds/KDE_Startup.wav
    sample format: 401, sample width: 16
    channelCount: 1
    frameCount: 182592
    job finished
    UnixManager: got notifyIO
    socketconnection created, fd = 8
    play '/usr/share/sounds/KDE_Startup.wav'! job finished

    I've seen a couple of websites saying that I need to upgrade to a 2.6
    kernel to use ALSA. I'd like to avoid that, as I'm happy with my current
    kernel, and everything works, and I haven't got the time right now for
    compiling new kernels (I've done it a few times, and I always seem to
    break something!). It seems to me that Mandrake 9.2 ought to support ALSA
    if it includes ALSA drivers and services. What am I missing?

    --
    \\\\\ ----> hedgie@hedgie.com <----
    \\\\\\\__o Bringing hedgehogs to the common folk since 1994.
    __\\\\\\\'/__________________________________________________ ______

    Visit http://www.hedgie.com for information on my latest book,
    "Waiting for War," published by Aventine Press!


  2. Re: ALSA in Mandrake 9.2

    Jimmy Brokaw wrote:
    >
    >Here's what I've done:
    >Using harddrake I've changed the soundcard's driver from i810_audio to
    >snd-intel8x0.
    >I've stopped the sound service.
    >I've started the alsa service.
    >
    >This leaves me with no sound at all. I used modprobe to discover that


    A few things to look at. Do "lsmod" and see what you have
    loaded. You want to see *lots* of things there! Here are the
    modules that get loaded for a CMI PCI card (and most of them
    will be for any card),

    Module Size Used by
    snd_pcm_oss 48644 1
    snd_mixer_oss 15936 1 snd_pcm_oss
    snd_cmipci 24692 1
    snd_pcm 79168 2 snd_pcm_oss,snd_cmipci
    snd_page_alloc 9156 1 snd_pcm
    snd_opl3_lib 8832 1 snd_cmipci
    snd_timer 20416 2 snd_pcm,snd_opl3_lib
    snd_hwdep 7360 1 snd_opl3_lib
    snd_mpu401_uart 6144 1 snd_cmipci
    snd_rawmidi 19328 1 snd_mpu401_uart
    snd_seq_device 6852 2 snd_opl3_lib,snd_rawmidi
    snd 44292 10[list deleted, it was everything above]
    soundcore 7712 2 snd

    Then you want to look for a few device special files that may or
    may not have been created in the installation process.

    Do "ls -l" on each of these to verify they exist, and are set to
    something reasonable for owner and group. The owner can be
    root, and the group should be a group that all users who are
    allowed to access the sound card are part of. That group might
    be a unique group, or might just the group that all users
    default to.

    /dev/admmidi0 /dev/admmidi1 /dev/admmidi2 /dev/admmidi3
    /dev/adsp /dev/adsp0 /dev/adsp1 /dev/adsp2
    /dev/adsp3 /dev/aio /dev/aloadC0 /dev/aloadC1
    /dev/aloadC2 /dev/aloadC3 /dev/aloadSEQ /dev/amidi
    /dev/amidi0 /dev/amidi1 /dev/amidi2 /dev/amidi3
    /dev/amixer0 /dev/amixer1 /dev/amixer2 /dev/amixer3
    /dev/audio /dev/audio0 /dev/audio1 /dev/audio2
    /dev/audio3

    The easiest way to check is just to "ls -l /dev/a*", which may
    give you a few extras, but it will show all of the above to be
    there or not.

    If some or all of them are missing, download the alsa-drivers
    distribution package and run the "snddevices" script to create
    them.

    One other potential problem could byte you... I set up an old
    Sound Blaster PnP ISA AWE64 sound card recently and it has the
    unusual characteristic of losing its memory everytime it is
    booted... and comes up with all volume controls set to 0. So it
    works perfectly, but produces no sound until it is turned on
    with xmixer or amixer. That required setting up a boot time rc
    file using amixer to reset it when the system is booted.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd@barrow.com

  3. Re: ALSA in Mandrake 9.2

    Floyd L. Davidson sat down at the computer and pounded the following into
    the keyboard:

    > If some or all of them are missing, download the alsa-drivers distribution
    > package and run the "snddevices" script to create them.


    I had all the modules. I was missing the a* devices (I had dsp, but not
    adsp, for example). I created those as you instructed, and it still
    didn't work. I noted that the amixer files were created root/root instead
    of user, with 700 permissions. I changed those to 777, and it still
    didn't work.

    Using the artsd graphical config tool, I get the error "cannot connect to
    device". If I manually point it to /dev/adsp (or /dev/sound/adsp) I get
    no such file, even though it exists. Any clues?

    I went ahead and tried installed the Mandrake 2.6.x kernel, and even with
    default settings it won't load my nVidia drivers, thus, no X. Right now
    I'm trying to decide which problem to tackle, the video or the sound. Or
    is it easier to just upgrade to Mandrake 10 and hope that sorts out
    everything?

    --
    \\\\\ ----> hedgie@hedgie.com <----
    \\\\\\\__o Bringing hedgehogs to the common folk since 1994.
    __\\\\\\\'/__________________________________________________ ______

    Visit http://www.hedgie.com for information on my latest book,
    "Waiting for War," published by Aventine Press!


  4. Re: ALSA in Mandrake 9.2

    In article , Jimmy Brokaw wrote:
    >
    > Using the artsd graphical config tool, I get the error "cannot connect to
    > device". If I manually point it to /dev/adsp (or /dev/sound/adsp) I get
    > no such file, even though it exists. Any clues?


    The device is running software (in the kernel or a loaded module or
    an auto-loaded module if the kernel recognizes it and the modules.conf
    file in 2.4.x or the modprobe.conf in 2.6.x has the correct entries).

    Linux accesses most items with a "file system entry".
    The entry /dev/dsp or whatever, may exist. But the actual
    device (driver) may not (the software is not running).

    The /dev/ entries are special entries simply listing a major/minor
    access point - and there must be something the kernel can access
    or you get a "no such device" error.

+ Reply to Thread