partition problem (partition table issue) - Help

This is a discussion on partition problem (partition table issue) - Help ; I have a 20 gig drive with a 1.9 gig fat16 partition, a 7.99 gig fat32 partition, and some other linux ext3fs partitions I cant remember the size of right now. The fat16/32 store important data on them (emails, downloads, ...

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Thread: partition problem (partition table issue)

  1. partition problem (partition table issue)

    I have a 20 gig drive with a 1.9 gig fat16 partition, a 7.99 gig fat32
    partition, and some other linux ext3fs partitions I cant remember the
    size of right now. The
    fat16/32 store important data on them (emails, downloads, etc), while
    the linux partitions have my successful efforts of linux digital video
    editing. As the title suggests, the partition table got messed up by
    a virus in windows, and the boot sector got trashed (fdisk -l on a
    rescue cdrom lists nothing); I can't mount anything. fdisk /mbr
    didn't work multiple times. What can I possibly do?

  2. Re: partition problem (partition table issue)

    have you tried a system update from the
    linux installation cd. That should at least get you back into
    linux and save your data.

  3. Re: partition problem (partition table issue)

    Quackker12 wrote:
    > I have a 20 gig drive with a 1.9 gig fat16 partition, a 7.99 gig fat32
    > partition, and some other linux ext3fs partitions I cant remember the
    > size of right now. The
    > fat16/32 store important data on them (emails, downloads, etc), while
    > the linux partitions have my successful efforts of linux digital video
    > editing. As the title suggests, the partition table got messed up by
    > a virus in windows, and the boot sector got trashed (fdisk -l on a
    > rescue cdrom lists nothing); I can't mount anything. fdisk /mbr
    > didn't work multiple times. What can I possibly do?


    Now this is a *very* dangerous thing to do, but if you run the linux
    fdisk utility again, setting up *exactly* the same configuration as
    before, the partitions should become available to you again with no loss
    of data.

    *** However, it is a very dangerous proceedure _and you will lose data
    if you get the configuration wrong_. ***

    It should only be used as a last resort (and after a full HD backup).

    --
    Ben M.

    ----------------
    What are Software Patents for?
    To protect the small enterprise from bigger companies.

    What do Software Patents do?
    In its current form, they protect only companies with
    big legal departments as they:
    a.) Patent everything no matter how general
    b.) Sue everybody. Even if the patent can be argued
    invalid, small companies can ill-afford the
    typical $500k cost of a law-suit (not to mention
    years of harassment).

    Don't let them take away your right to program
    whatever you like. Make a stand on Software Patents
    before its too late.

    Read about the ongoing battle at http://swpat.ffii.org/
    ----------------

  4. Re: partition problem (partition table issue)

    Darklight wrote in message news:...
    > have you tried a system update from the
    > linux installation cd. That should at least get you back into
    > linux and save your data.


    what do you mean by a system update?
    I tried knoppix; it saw the partitions, but couldn't moun them

  5. Re: partition problem (partition table issue)

    Ben Measures wrote:

    > Now this is a very dangerous thing to do, but if you run the linux
    > fdisk utility again, setting up exactly the same configuration as
    > before, the partitions should become available to you again with no loss
    > of data.


    .... that was going to be my suggestion, as this merely
    writes the partition table entries and does not do any
    formatting
    ..
    --
    << http://michaeljtobler.homelinux.com/ >>
    I can read your mind, and you should be ashamed of yourself.


  6. Re: partition problem (partition table issue)

    I'm sorry I don't have time to work out the details, but here are some
    suggestions to get started.

    1. Use "dd" to make a verbatim copy of your hard drive somewhere. This way
    you can always get back what you had before if you mess it up.

    2. Thoroughly study the fdisk documentation (man and info pages) if you
    haven't already.

    3. Thoroughly study the mkfs and related (mke2fs, etc) man and info pages.
    Look for instructions on how to re-issue the original mkfs command that
    was used to make the partition you want to rescue. You have to get this
    exactly right or you further corrupt the partition.

    4. If all else fails, look into ways to rescue ("undelete") the file
    contents from the raw partition information. This is not fun, though it is
    a giant rush when and if you succeed.

    And last, but not least,

    5. Backup whatever is of real value on your windows partition, destroy
    windows, and never look back!!!

    "You don't need windows."

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 00:20:18 -0800, Quackker12 wrote:

    > I have a 20 gig drive with a 1.9 gig fat16 partition, a 7.99 gig fat32
    > partition, and some other linux ext3fs partitions I cant remember the
    > size of right now. The
    > fat16/32 store important data on them (emails, downloads, etc), while
    > the linux partitions have my successful efforts of linux digital video
    > editing. As the title suggests, the partition table got messed up by
    > a virus in windows, and the boot sector got trashed (fdisk -l on a
    > rescue cdrom lists nothing); I can't mount anything. fdisk /mbr
    > didn't work multiple times. What can I possibly do?


    --
    Thomas D. Shepard
    Sorry, you can't email me.
    (Email address is fake.)


  7. Re: partition problem (partition table issue)

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 13:40:44 -0800,
    Thomas D. Shepard wrote:
    > I'm sorry I don't have time to work out the details, but here are some
    > suggestions to get started.
    >
    > 1. Use "dd" to make a verbatim copy of your hard drive somewhere. This way
    > you can always get back what you had before if you mess it up.


    Okay.

    >
    > 2. Thoroughly study the fdisk documentation (man and info pages) if you
    > haven't already.


    Good idea, but it isn't particulary useful at this junction for him.

    >
    > 3. Thoroughly study the mkfs and related (mke2fs, etc) man and info pages.
    > Look for instructions on how to re-issue the original mkfs command that
    > was used to make the partition you want to rescue. You have to get this
    > exactly right or you further corrupt the partition.


    Huh, he wants to recover data, not destroy it. The fs exists and may be
    fine, he needs to recreate the partition table. mkfs will remove the
    directory structure, it also has nothing to do with creating partitions.

    >
    > 4. If all else fails, look into ways to rescue ("undelete") the file
    > contents from the raw partition information. This is not fun, though it is
    > a giant rush when and if you succeed.


    Useful in case of an accidental mkfs, not for a missing/corrupt
    partition table.

    >
    > And last, but not least,
    >
    > 5. Backup whatever is of real value on your windows partition, destroy
    > windows, and never look back!!!
    >
    > "You don't need windows."


    Whether he does or not doesn't matter, this isn't COLA.

    And please don't top post.

    There are programs out there that will attempt to reconstruct your
    partition table. If you can get back into linux, man lilo [-U]
    I'm unsure if boot.0300 contains partition table or not.

    If the only critical data is on the Fat16 partition and it was
    /dev/hda1, use fdisk to recreate the partition so it is larger than what
    you had before. Back up data and fdisk, do a

    dd if=dev/zero of=/dev/hda1 bs=512 count=4

    reboot and reformat. Windows will reformat to the previous size if you
    don't zero the first sector even if you change the partition size.

    If you need to get info off of other partitions you'll need to find the
    start of the partitions and recreate a partition that starts there.
    (before formatting of course.)

    Good Luck and once you are back up and running implement a back up
    policy.

    Michael C.
    --
    mcsuper5@usol.com http://mcsuper5.freeshell.org/
    Registered Linux User #303915 http://counter.li.org/



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