What the ~/ is that??? - Help

This is a discussion on What the ~/ is that??? - Help ; I've been trying to create default login scripts for my debian system. I've figured out that i can edit the scripts using "ae ~/.bashrc" or "ae ~/.profile". Trouble is what the heck does the ~/ stand for??? I would like ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: What the ~/ is that???

  1. What the ~/ is that???

    I've been trying to create default login scripts for my debian system.
    I've figured out that i can edit the scripts using "ae ~/.bashrc" or
    "ae ~/.profile". Trouble is what the heck does the ~/ stand for???

    I would like to know, because I would like to be able to locate the
    files directly. That way, I can create a backup disk with (for
    example) folders named /bash /etc /bin (etc) and then do a "cp -av .
    /" from the backup drive to restore all of my configuration files and
    folders.

    Any help on this would be GREAT!

    Thanks
    Christopher

  2. Re: What the ~/ is that???

    Christopher wrote:

    > I've been trying to create default login scripts for my debian system.
    > I've figured out that i can edit the scripts using "ae ~/.bashrc" or
    > "ae ~/.profile". Trouble is what the heck does the ~/ stand for???
    >
    > I would like to know, because I would like to be able to locate the
    > files directly. That way, I can create a backup disk with (for
    > example) folders named /bash /etc /bin (etc) and then do a "cp -av .
    > /" from the backup drive to restore all of my configuration files and
    > folders.


    "~" in several shells is a symbol which is expanded to the user's home
    directory. E.g., since my home directory is /home/casey, ~/.profile would
    be expanded to /home/casey/.profile.

    --
    ZZzz |\ _,,,---,,_ Travis S. Casey
    /,`.-'`' -. ;-;;,_ No one agrees with me. Not even me.
    |,4- ) )-,_..;\ ( `'-'
    '---''(_/--' `-'\_)

  3. Re: What the ~/ is that???

    > "~" in several shells is a symbol which is expanded to the user's home
    > directory. E.g., since my home directory is /home/casey, ~/.profile would
    > be expanded to /home/casey/.profile.


    you might want to try "echo ~" to provide the precise path that ~ expands
    to.



+ Reply to Thread