Newbie advice and installing on a RAID-0 Array - Help

This is a discussion on Newbie advice and installing on a RAID-0 Array - Help ; Built a new system over the holidays, and I figure why not dedicate a partition to Linux so I can start learning it and hopefully find something to use it for. I have never messed with it before and have ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Newbie advice and installing on a RAID-0 Array

  1. Newbie advice and installing on a RAID-0 Array

    Built a new system over the holidays, and I figure why not dedicate a
    partition to Linux so I can start learning it and hopefully find something
    to use it for. I have never messed with it before and have basically zero
    knowledge of the OS itself. I have no doubt I'll be able to figure out
    whatever installation directions there are, but the problem lies with
    selecting which distribution of Linux to use. I'm pretty quick on picking
    up things once I get into it so I don't want something completely dumbed
    down, but just something where I'll be able to operate simple programs at
    first without having to know everything at once, but I would like a full
    feature set. If anyone has any suggestions for that it would be great.
    Also, should a 10gig partition be enough to handle it or is more needed. I
    have no idea how much space Linux apps take up or anything so I'm in the
    dark here.

    The second question involves the fact that I'm in a RAID-0 Array, and is
    there any special drivers for Linux that I need to use or any difference in
    installing the OS? I don't see any Linux specific drivers on my boards
    manufacturer's site (it's an ABIT IC7-G), so I'm guessing maybe there are
    some universal drivers out there or something? Once again, I know
    absolutely nothing about Linux so I'm completely in the dark. Any guidance
    you guys could give would be much appreciated.

    Thanks a lot,




    Derek Heimlich



  2. Re: Newbie advice and installing on a RAID-0 Array

    On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 10:55:53 -0500, Be.Al.Zeebub read and pondered:

    > Built a new system over the holidays, and I figure why not dedicate a
    > partition to Linux so I can start learning it and hopefully find something
    > to use it for. I have never messed with it before and have basically zero
    > knowledge of the OS itself. I have no doubt I'll be able to figure out
    > whatever installation directions there are, but the problem lies with
    > selecting which distribution of Linux to use. I'm pretty quick on picking
    > up things once I get into it so I don't want something completely dumbed
    > down, but just something where I'll be able to operate simple programs at
    > first without having to know everything at once, but I would like a full
    > feature set. If anyone has any suggestions for that it would be great.
    > Also, should a 10gig partition be enough to handle it or is more needed. I
    > have no idea how much space Linux apps take up or anything so I'm in the
    > dark here.
    >
    > The second question involves the fact that I'm in a RAID-0 Array, and is
    > there any special drivers for Linux that I need to use or any difference in
    > installing the OS? I don't see any Linux specific drivers on my boards
    > manufacturer's site (it's an ABIT IC7-G), so I'm guessing maybe there are
    > some universal drivers out there or something? Once again, I know
    > absolutely nothing about Linux so I'm completely in the dark. Any guidance
    > you guys could give would be much appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks a lot,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Derek Heimlich


    Try Mandrake 9.2. For your requirements its probably the best. I recently
    upgraded my computer with a GA 8IPE Pro1000 MB, P4 2.8C cpu, ATI Radeon
    9200SE VGA card and 1024Mb dual channel PC400 DDR DSRAM. Dual booting with
    WinXP. OK, so Mandrake looked at the new hardware and *ate it*; WinXP shat
    itself and refused to boot. Reinstalled Mandrake after a power problem
    splattered too many system files to recover from (with WinXP brooding and
    butt ugly back in the old box), now I have three kernels to boot into. An
    'enterprise' kernel to take advantage of all the RAM, an SMP kernel for
    the HT cpu, and a vanilla Linux kernel. Impressive. As an OS its pretty
    user friendly too. Before you make any decisions try out Knoppix first,
    and go for a full install later. Knoppix is a full Linux OS that runs
    entirely off a CD.
    http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html
    http://www.mandrakelinux.com/en/

    --
    B.Al.Zeebub
    Registered Linux User #339345
    Who are you going to believe, me or your own eyes?-Groucho Marx


+ Reply to Thread