Basic Newbie question (this should not take long to answer) - Help

This is a discussion on Basic Newbie question (this should not take long to answer) - Help ; I am ver new to linux (coming from a Windows world). The basic question that I have is that I am quickly noticing the differences with windows vs linux. The issue that currently has me stumped is how to install ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Basic Newbie question (this should not take long to answer)

  1. Basic Newbie question (this should not take long to answer)

    I am ver new to linux (coming from a Windows world). The basic question that
    I have is that I am quickly noticing the differences with windows vs linux.
    The issue that currently has me stumped is how to install simple programs.
    Can someone walk me through the process (step by step) on how to install
    downloaded software (for example, I just downloaded Opera and Mozilla and I
    have the files sitting on my computer and I do not know what to do next)

    Again, I stress the fact that I am a newbie which means that I kindly ask if
    you would not foward me a web link that covers the information that I am
    requestion, but it is written for people who have some years of experience
    in linux.

    Again thank you for your help in this matter!




  2. Re: Basic Newbie question (this should not take long to answer)

    "dsterling1" wrote in message news:<32_Jb.3100$uF6.1373592@news1.news.adelphia.net>...
    > I am ver new to linux (coming from a Windows world). The basic question that
    > I have is that I am quickly noticing the differences with windows vs linux.
    > The issue that currently has me stumped is how to install simple programs.
    > Can someone walk me through the process (step by step) on how to install
    > downloaded software (for example, I just downloaded Opera and Mozilla and I
    > have the files sitting on my computer and I do not know what to do next)


    From the instructions:

    Linux Installation Instructions
    -------------------------------

    Note: If you install in the default directory (which is
    usually /usr/local/mozilla), or any other directory where
    only the root user normally has write-access, you must
    start Mozilla first as root before other users can start
    the program. Doing so generates a set of files required
    for later use by other users.


    To install Mozilla by downloading the Mozilla installer,
    follow these steps:

    1. Create a directory named mozilla (mkdir mozilla)
    and change to that directory (cd mozilla).

    2. Click the link on the site you're downloading
    Mozilla from to download the installer file
    (called mozilla-1686-pc-linux-gnu-installer.tar.gz)
    to your machine.

    3. Change to the mozilla directory (cd mozilla) and
    decompress the archive with the following command:

    tar zxvf moz*.tar.gz

    The installer is now located in a subdirectory of
    Mozilla named mozilla-installer.

    4. Change to the mozilla-installer directory
    (cd mozilla-installer) and run the installer with the
    ./mozilla-installer command.

    5. Follow the instructions in the install wizard for
    installing Mozilla.

    Note: If you have a slower machine, be aware that the
    installation may take some time. In this case, the
    installation progress may appear to hang indefinitely,
    even though the installation is still in process.

    6. To start Mozilla, change to the directory where you
    installed it and run the ./mozilla command.


    To install Mozilla by downloading the tar.gz file:

    1. Create a directory named "mozilla" (mkdir mozilla)
    and change to that directory (cd mozilla).

    2. Click the link on the site you're downloading
    Mozilla from to download the non-installer
    (mozilla*.tar.gz) file into the mozilla directory.

    3. Change to the mozilla directory (cd mozilla) and
    decompress the file with the following command:

    tar zxvf moz*.tar.gz

    This creates a "mozilla" directory under your mozilla
    directory.

    4. Change to the mozilla directory (cd mozilla).

    5. Run Mozilla with the following run script:

    ./mozilla


    To hook up Mozilla complete with icon to the GNOME Panel,
    follow these steps:

    1. Click the GNOME Main Menu button, open the Panel menu,
    and then open the Add to Panel submenu and choose Launcher.

    2. Right-click the icon for Mozilla on the Panel and
    enter the following command:
    directory_name./mozilla

    where directory_name is the name of the directory
    you downloaded mozilla to. For example, the default
    directory that Mozilla suggests is /usr/local/mozilla.

    3. Type in a name for the icon, and type in a comment
    if you wish.

    4. Click the icon button and type in the following as
    the icon's location:

    directory_name/icons/mozicon50.xpm

    where directory name is the directory where you
    installed Mozilla. For example, the default directory
    is /usr/local/mozilla/icons/mozicon50.xpm.

  3. Re: Basic Newbie question (this should not take long to answer)

    On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 19:43:59 +0000, dsterling1 wrote:

    > I am ver new to linux (coming from a Windows world). The basic question
    > that I have is that I am quickly noticing the differences with windows
    > vs linux. The issue that currently has me stumped is how to install
    > simple programs. Can someone walk me through the process (step by step)
    > on how to install downloaded software (for example, I just downloaded
    > Opera and Mozilla and I have the files sitting on my computer and I do
    > not know what to do next)


    Not enough info is given.

    What distribution are you using? The answer to this question will
    make a big difference in the answer to your question. Package management
    varies between distros.

    What kind of software are you trying to install? Is is a precompiled,
    binary package, or are you wanting to compile and install from the source?

    If it is the latter, is it a simple tarball, or is it a source package?

    > Again, I stress the fact that I am a newbie which means that I kindly
    > ask if you would not foward me a web link that covers the information
    > that I am requestion, but it is written for people who have some years
    > of experience in linux.
    >
    > Again thank you for your help in this matter!


    You should either have a good book on linux (preferably one focused on
    whichever distro you are using), or get comfortable using tldp.org,
    google.com, groups.google.com, and any support docs the maker of your
    distro may provide. They'll make learning linux much easier than posting
    each question you have here and waiting for an answer.

  4. Re: Basic Newbie question (this should not take long to answer)

    take a look at http://www.linuxselfhelp.com

    That is a pretty good site for information on doing different things
    with Linux.

    Al Butler
    ka0ies

  5. Re: Basic Newbie question (this should not take long to answer)

    "dsterling1" wrote in message news:<32_Jb.3100$uF6.1373592@news1.news.adelphia.net>...
    > I am ver new to linux (coming from a Windows world). The basic question that
    > I have is that I am quickly noticing the differences with windows vs linux.
    > The issue that currently has me stumped is how to install simple programs.
    > Can someone walk me through the process (step by step) on how to install
    > downloaded software (for example, I just downloaded Opera and Mozilla and I
    > have the files sitting on my computer and I do not know what to do next)
    >
    > Again, I stress the fact that I am a newbie which means that I kindly ask if
    > you would not foward me a web link that covers the information that I am
    > requestion, but it is written for people who have some years of experience
    > in linux.
    >
    > Again thank you for your help in this matter!


    Usually software that you want to install consists of more than one
    file, including executables, configuration files, scripts,
    documentation, etc. What you actually download, however, is often
    just a single file, which consists of all the files mentioned above
    bundled together in some way to make a single file.

    One way of bundling files together is with tar, a sandard unix
    utility. So if you see ".tar" or ".tar.gz" or something like that at
    the end of the file you download, it was bundled together with tar.

    Another way of bundling files together is with a "package manager", of
    which the Red Hat Package Manager (rpm) is one of the most common.
    rpm is the standard method of installing packages on Red Hat, Mandrake
    and other distributions, but SuSE and other vendors use different
    package managers. See http://www.rpm.org/max-rpm/p111.html for more
    info about rpm. Packages created by rpm are files that end with
    ".rpm", so you can recognize them that way. For a newbie, these are
    the easiest to install; you just download the package (for example,
    blah.rpm), then execute (as root): rpm -U blah.rpm (there are
    variations on this).

    The ".gz" mentioned above refers to the programs gzip and gunzip,
    which are standard unix compression/decompression utilities. Thus a
    file ending with ".tar.gz" is a set of files bundled together with
    tar, then compressed with gzip. So if you download a file named
    "blah.tar.gz" you should put it in some directory, and first run
    gunzip blah.tar.gz, which should decompress the file and replace it
    with a file named blah.tar. Then you should run tar xf blah.tar,
    which will unpack the package, and will create (usually) lots of files
    contained in the package. Often these files are placed in a (new)
    directory below the directory you are working in, named something like
    blah-version69.96-rev4.9. Then cd to that directory and see what is
    in it. Usually it will contain some file named README or INSTALL (or
    both), which contain instructions for further installation. Usually
    there is some kind of script you run (often named install), note you
    usually have to run this as root.

    Such installation will fail (usually with some message) if you don't
    have the right run-time libraries on your system (or they are out of
    date). If this is the case, you have to update your system with the
    required libraries (or the right versions) and try installing again.
    Obviously this is less of a problem if you have a recent distribution,
    which will tend to have relatively up-to-date libraries.

    Sometimes the software unbundled from a tar package (or "tar ball") is
    in the form of binary files that just need to be placed in the right
    directories with the right configuration files. Sometimes the
    software is presented as source code, which you have to compile. Then
    there will usually be some kind of "make" script to do the compiling,
    and further scripts for doing the actual installation. This latter
    case is the most complicated (for a newbie), since in addition to the
    right run time libraries you will also need the right header files etc
    for compiling the source code.

    Hope this helps. --- Nessuno

  6. Re: Basic Newbie question (this should not take long to answer)

    On 6 Jan 2004 10:41:26 -0800, nessuno@wigner.berkeley.edu (nessuno)
    wrote:

    > So if you download a file named
    >"blah.tar.gz" you should put it in some directory, and first run
    >gunzip blah.tar.gz, which should decompress the file and replace it
    >with a file named blah.tar.


    Or, you can do things the easy way and just put the proper option on
    the command line for tar and let it do that for you.

    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns
    Unix doesn't prevent you from doing something stupid because
    that would prevent me from doing something clever.
    http://www.lasfs.org http://home.earthlink.net/~sidebrnz

+ Reply to Thread