HD Temps - Help

This is a discussion on HD Temps - Help ; I notice that three of my 4 hard drives consistently run in a temperature range of 104 to 108 degrees F. or about 37 to 42 degrees C. The 4th drive, /dev/sda a 10,000 rpm runs around 35 C or ...

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Thread: HD Temps

  1. HD Temps

    I notice that three of my 4 hard drives consistently run in a
    temperature range of 104 to 108 degrees F. or about 37 to 42 degrees C.
    The 4th drive, /dev/sda a 10,000 rpm runs around 35 C or 100 degrees F.

    Any comments? My CPU -- An AMD64 2.1GHz -- seems to run right at 115
    degrees F all the time.

    Any thoughts from you all about my need for more temperature control and
    cooling?

    Thanks in advance,

    Dave

  2. Re: HD Temps

    On Tue, 20 Feb 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in article
    , CWO4 Dave Mann wrote:

    >I notice that three of my 4 hard drives consistently run in a
    >temperature range of 104 to 108 degrees F. or about 37 to 42 degrees C.
    >The 4th drive, /dev/sda a 10,000 rpm runs around 35 C or 100 degrees F.


    Most hard drives are rated 0-50C ambient - so you're well within the
    allowed ranges. Experimentally, increasing temperatures in the 40's
    marginally increases the failure rates, though how much of an increase
    and whether or not it's significant is open to wide debate.

    >Any comments? My CPU -- An AMD64 2.1GHz -- seems to run right at 115
    >degrees F all the time.


    I don't have the CPU specs handy, but that also sounds within reason.

    >Any thoughts from you all about my need for more temperature control and
    >cooling?


    Lessee, ARIN says you're in Tennessee, and the weather channel doesn't
    seem to indicate unusual temperatures, while the National Geographic
    atlas suggests an _average_ high in summers into the low 30s (or 90F
    for us old types). I'm guessing that you MAY have air conditioning for
    the summer, and thus, the ambient inside temperatures are likely to
    remain below +33C/91F under the worst cases. In winter, we have no
    worries about high temperatures unless your computer is setting in
    front of a heater duct. ;-)

    I'm near Phoenix, and external summer temps can hit +45C and sometimes
    higher. Consequently, we've got central air, but the cost of electricity
    makes it wise to hold internal temps to a max of +30C/86F ("It's not the
    heat, it's the humidity!" - famous local saying). My home setup does
    have additional (filtered) fans blowing ambient into the front of the
    boxes, exhausting over the drives and the power supply. For the servers
    in a tower case, this is a box that fits over the front of the case and
    made out of furnace filter material (mainly to keep pet hair and dust
    bunnies out) along with a 4.7 inch fan (Rotron MU2B1, Papst 4606X or
    similar, nominal 100 CFM fan with ball bearings). The workstations are
    similar, but have a lower horsepower fan (50-80 CFM Rotron WR2A1, Papst
    4800X or similar) which is also quieter. I had experimented with hard
    drive carriers that had tiny (1.5 inch dia) fans, but think they're not
    worth the expense. Instead, the bezels that would cover the front of
    the drive bay are replaced with window screen. With an external fan
    pressurizing the case, this causes air to exhaust over the drives.

    Part of the question is how do you _reliably_ measure temperatures.
    Many of the built-in sensors as well as the garden variety thermometers
    are inaccurate. I used an old photo chemicals thermometer to calibrate
    a cheap thermocouple based indicator. Temps in a computer case can
    vary significantly in static conditions, based on all the cards,
    ribbon cables, and what-not mucking with the airflow. Taking the case
    cover off is almost always detrimental to cooling as you disrupt the
    desired cool air flow. Basic goal is to have the exhaust temperatures
    less than 50C/122F under all circumstances. As the exhaust is (or
    _should_ be) exiting over the hottest components, that ensures the
    rest of the box is cooler. For rough figures, I see my drive temps
    running about 5-8C (10-15F) higher than room temperatures. This
    might be overkill for you, depending on how hot things are. The fan
    noise is slightly noticeable, but that just means I turn the stereo up
    a tiny bit. At work, they simply crank the air conditioner up a notch,
    at keep the work areas around 75-78F - the server rooms are of course
    cooled below zero (or so it seems) though we've been adding more rack
    mounted blade servers - the typical dinosaur pit mode (air up through
    the floors).

    Old guy

  3. Re: HD Temps

    Moe Trin wrote:
    > On Tue, 20 Feb 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in article
    > , CWO4 Dave Mann wrote:
    >
    >> I notice that three of my 4 hard drives consistently run in a
    >> temperature range of 104 to 108 degrees F. or about 37 to 42 degrees C.
    >> The 4th drive, /dev/sda a 10,000 rpm runs around 35 C or 100 degrees F.

    >
    > Most hard drives are rated 0-50C ambient - so you're well within the
    > allowed ranges. Experimentally, increasing temperatures in the 40's
    > marginally increases the failure rates, though how much of an increase
    > and whether or not it's significant is open to wide debate.
    >
    >> Any comments? My CPU -- An AMD64 2.1GHz -- seems to run right at 115
    >> degrees F all the time.

    >
    > I don't have the CPU specs handy, but that also sounds within reason.
    >
    >> Any thoughts from you all about my need for more temperature control and
    >> cooling?

    >
    > Lessee, ARIN says you're in Tennessee, and the weather channel doesn't
    > seem to indicate unusual temperatures, while the National Geographic
    > atlas suggests an _average_ high in summers into the low 30s (or 90F
    > for us old types). I'm guessing that you MAY have air conditioning for
    > the summer, and thus, the ambient inside temperatures are likely to
    > remain below +33C/91F under the worst cases. In winter, we have no
    > worries about high temperatures unless your computer is setting in
    > front of a heater duct. ;-)
    >
    > I'm near Phoenix, and external summer temps can hit +45C and sometimes
    > higher. Consequently, we've got central air, but the cost of electricity
    > makes it wise to hold internal temps to a max of +30C/86F ("It's not the
    > heat, it's the humidity!" - famous local saying). My home setup does
    > have additional (filtered) fans blowing ambient into the front of the
    > boxes, exhausting over the drives and the power supply. For the servers
    > in a tower case, this is a box that fits over the front of the case and
    > made out of furnace filter material (mainly to keep pet hair and dust
    > bunnies out) along with a 4.7 inch fan (Rotron MU2B1, Papst 4606X or
    > similar, nominal 100 CFM fan with ball bearings). The workstations are
    > similar, but have a lower horsepower fan (50-80 CFM Rotron WR2A1, Papst
    > 4800X or similar) which is also quieter. I had experimented with hard
    > drive carriers that had tiny (1.5 inch dia) fans, but think they're not
    > worth the expense. Instead, the bezels that would cover the front of
    > the drive bay are replaced with window screen. With an external fan
    > pressurizing the case, this causes air to exhaust over the drives.
    >
    > Part of the question is how do you _reliably_ measure temperatures.
    > Many of the built-in sensors as well as the garden variety thermometers
    > are inaccurate. I used an old photo chemicals thermometer to calibrate
    > a cheap thermocouple based indicator. Temps in a computer case can
    > vary significantly in static conditions, based on all the cards,
    > ribbon cables, and what-not mucking with the airflow. Taking the case
    > cover off is almost always detrimental to cooling as you disrupt the
    > desired cool air flow. Basic goal is to have the exhaust temperatures
    > less than 50C/122F under all circumstances. As the exhaust is (or
    > _should_ be) exiting over the hottest components, that ensures the
    > rest of the box is cooler. For rough figures, I see my drive temps
    > running about 5-8C (10-15F) higher than room temperatures. This
    > might be overkill for you, depending on how hot things are. The fan
    > noise is slightly noticeable, but that just means I turn the stereo up
    > a tiny bit. At work, they simply crank the air conditioner up a notch,
    > at keep the work areas around 75-78F - the server rooms are of course
    > cooled below zero (or so it seems) though we've been adding more rack
    > mounted blade servers - the typical dinosaur pit mode (air up through
    > the floors).
    >
    > Old guy



    Thank you Moe! Very complete and clear. I think I will not worry about
    temperatures and will not fix something which isn't broken. When I
    built "The Mighty Wurlitzer" last year, I used temp controlled fans --
    big ones. I can hardly hear anything from the box and sometimes will
    move the mouse to see if it is still alive down there.

    So, problem (if I ever had one) is now explained and solved!

    Thanks!

    Dave


  4. Re: HD Temps

    On Wed, 21 Feb 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in article
    , CWO4 Dave Mann wrote:

    >Thank you Moe! Very complete and clear. I think I will not worry about
    >temperatures and will not fix something which isn't broken. When I
    >built "The Mighty Wurlitzer" last year, I used temp controlled fans --
    >big ones. I can hardly hear anything from the box and sometimes will
    >move the mouse to see if it is still alive down there.


    I got transferred here from Nor-Cal in July 1995, we had the thermostats
    set to the customary 74F, and I noted that the air conditioners were
    working very hard. That first electric bill was an eye (as well as the
    wallet) opener. Those thermostats went up to 82 right away. I hacked
    together some dust shields and stuck fans around the cases - Rotron
    "Tarzan" fans (TN3A2, 6.9 inch square, 4 inch deep - 340 CFM) that I had
    as spares from some project. Noisy? You could hear them in the
    hallway with the doors closed. But they did the job until I could get
    some more suitable fans.

    >So, problem (if I ever had one) is now explained and solved!


    Yeah, I don't think you've got a problem. Sure it's cool/cold now,
    but even a 10F higher ambient should keep you within limits.

    >Thanks!


    Welcome!

    Old guy


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