Cleaning Out my Dstribution - Help

This is a discussion on Cleaning Out my Dstribution - Help ; I've been reading various on-line articles about building a kernel. I d/l the Linux from Scratch pdf and am still reading through it. What I would like to do is take my existing kernal and remove the non-essential applications, load ...

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  1. Cleaning Out my Dstribution

    I've been reading various on-line articles about building a kernel. I
    d/l the Linux from Scratch pdf and am still reading through it.

    What I would like to do is take my existing kernal and remove the
    non-essential applications, load only those applications on start-up
    that are necessary, etc.

    I am thinking maybe this would give me a system lean and more efficient.

    However, My system works fine now, at least until I load Blender, which
    then eats up the last of my 4GB of RAM ....

    Linux seems so efficient that doing a clean up job doesn't seem needed
    -- at least to me. I ran Kleen Sweep and have lists of so much stuff
    KleenSweep found that I don't know if they are anomolies or not.

    Here is an example of a KleenSweep log just to show you what I am
    talking about -- in other words, to remove or not to remove??



    Here is an example -- Kleepsweep found over 4,000 duplicated files on my
    system:

    [-] 9 /usr/include/sys/unistd.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/wine/msvcrt/sys/unistd.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/swdisp.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/swdisp.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/rawld.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/rawld.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/gbfrtf.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/gbfrtf.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/utf8html.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/utf8html.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/listkey.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/listkey.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/gbfheadings.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/gbfheadings.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/swconfig.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/swconfig.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/utf16utf8.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/utf16utf8.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/zld.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/zld.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/swversion.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/swversion.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/regex.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/regex.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/osisheadings.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/osisheadings.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/thmlplain.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/thmlplain.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/swcom.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/swcom.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/nullim.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/nullim.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/localemgr.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/localemgr.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/gbfmorph.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/gbfmorph.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/osishtmlhref.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/osishtmlhref.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/thmlwordjs.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/thmlwordjs.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/gbfwebif.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/gbfwebif.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/plainhtml.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/plainhtml.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/thmlhtml.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/thmlhtml.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/Greek2Greek.h
    [-] 9 /usr/local/include/sword/Greek2Greek.h
    [-] 9 /usr/include/sword/swld.h


    Thanks for any advice ..

    Dave

  2. Re: Cleaning Out my Dstribution

    On Mon, 12 Feb 2007 10:06:53 -0600, CWO4 Dave Mann
    wrote:

    >
    >What I would like to do is take my existing kernal and remove the
    >non-essential applications, load only those applications on start-up
    >that are necessary, etc.


    You're talking apples and oranges here. The kernal is the central
    program that runs everything else and mediates between the software
    and the hardware. What you're talking about is stopping various
    applications and/or services you don't need from running at boot.

    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns
    You know it's Enterprise Software when the vendor freebie is a red shirt.
    http://www.lasfs.info http://www.zeff.us

  3. Re: Cleaning Out my Dstribution

    Joe Zeff wrote:
    > On Mon, 12 Feb 2007 10:06:53 -0600, CWO4 Dave Mann
    > wrote:
    >
    >> What I would like to do is take my existing kernal and remove the
    >> non-essential applications, load only those applications on start-up
    >> that are necessary, etc.

    >
    > You're talking apples and oranges here. The kernal is the central
    > program that runs everything else and mediates between the software
    > and the hardware. What you're talking about is stopping various
    > applications and/or services you don't need from running at boot.
    >


    Hi Joe, aha! OK, I understand. When people talk about rebuilding their
    kernel, what I find from reading through various sources is that
    non-essential parts of the kernel are removed and then the kernel is
    re-built.

    I think what I want to do is what you said! I know how to make sure
    non-wanted applications and services don't run unless they are called
    upon, but what about duplicates, empty groups, and all of theother
    "problems" which KleepSweep finds?

    I realize that even after using Linux exclusively for almost 5 years, I
    am most likely still thinking like a MS Windows user.


    TIA!

    Dave

  4. Re: Cleaning Out my Dstribution

    On Tue, 13 Feb 2007 08:44:10 -0600, CWO4 Dave Mann
    wrote:

    >I think what I want to do is what you said! I know how to make sure
    >non-wanted applications and services don't run unless they are called
    >upon, but what about duplicates, empty groups, and all of theother
    >"problems" which KleepSweep finds?


    I've never heard of that and a quick googlemancy found no hits.

    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns
    "Is this one of those times when i should be crying out "Ugol!!" ?
    http://www.lasfs.info http://www.zeff.us

  5. Re: Cleaning Out my Dstribution

    On Mon, 12 Feb 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in article
    , CWO4 Dave Mann wrote:

    >I've been reading various on-line articles about building a kernel. I
    >d/l the Linux from Scratch pdf and am still reading through it.
    >
    >What I would like to do is take my existing kernal and remove the
    >non-essential applications, load only those applications on start-up
    >that are necessary, etc.


    I would hope you don't have any applications running in kernel space,
    as _applications_ are a user activity. Running applications are found
    using the 'ps' command, and 'ps afuwx' may give you a clue where they
    are being started. From a system point of view, these would be started
    in the boot scripts, or out of the 'super-server' (most likely xinetd
    in your case). Your 'user' level applications are probably being
    started out of your desktop.

    >I am thinking maybe this would give me a system lean and more efficient.


    The average Linux distribution provides what are called "kitchen sink"
    kernels, with nearly every option known to man-kind included, MOST OFTEN
    AS A KERNEL MODULE THAT IS LOADED ON DEMAND ONLY. If you look in
    /lib/modules/$KERNEL_VERSION/ you are likely to find eleven jillion
    modules that are available, but if you use the command 'lsmod' to see
    what is actually being loaded, you'd find there is very little.

    >However, My system works fine now, at least until I load Blender, which
    >then eats up the last of my 4GB of RAM ....


    man top and look at the '-m' command to see what's eating memory.
    '/bin/ps' will also provide clues - especially if your memory hogs are
    consuming more than one or two hundred lines in a 'top' display.

    As far as compiling a lean/mean kernel, wander over to the Linux
    Documentation Project (http://tldp.org/guides.html), and look for the
    kernel documentation.

    [compton ~]$ grep ' \*' temp/new/guides.txt.01.04.07 | grep -i kernel
    * The Linux Kernel Module Programming Guide
    * Linux Kernel 2.4 Internals
    * The Linux Kernel Hackers' Guide
    * The Linux Kernel
    [compton ~]$

    Yes, you can make a leaner system. This is the rational for the 'gentoo'
    distribution, where you install a very minimalist startup system, and
    then compile EVERYTHING for lean/mean. Takes a lot more effort, and
    makes you responsible for any security problems - as your system is now
    more-or-less unique.

    >Here is an example -- Kleepsweep found over 4,000 duplicated files on my
    >system:


    I think you'll find a lot of those are due to installing *-devel*
    packages on your system, and most of those are not in real-time use.
    Try 'rpm -qa | grep devel' and see how many of those packages you
    have. Generally, they're only required when compiling/building stuff.

    Old guy


  6. Re: Cleaning Out my Dstribution

    Moe Trin wrote:
    > On Mon, 12 Feb 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in article
    > , CWO4 Dave Mann wrote:
    >
    >> I've been reading various on-line articles about building a kernel. I
    >> d/l the Linux from Scratch pdf and am still reading through it.
    >>
    >> What I would like to do is take my existing kernal and remove the
    >> non-essential applications, load only those applications on start-up
    >> that are necessary, etc.

    >
    > I would hope you don't have any applications running in kernel space,
    > as _applications_ are a user activity. Running applications are found
    > using the 'ps' command, and 'ps afuwx' may give you a clue where they
    > are being started. From a system point of view, these would be started
    > in the boot scripts, or out of the 'super-server' (most likely xinetd
    > in your case). Your 'user' level applications are probably being
    > started out of your desktop.
    >
    >> I am thinking maybe this would give me a system lean and more efficient.

    >
    > The average Linux distribution provides what are called "kitchen sink"
    > kernels, with nearly every option known to man-kind included, MOST OFTEN
    > AS A KERNEL MODULE THAT IS LOADED ON DEMAND ONLY. If you look in
    > /lib/modules/$KERNEL_VERSION/ you are likely to find eleven jillion
    > modules that are available, but if you use the command 'lsmod' to see
    > what is actually being loaded, you'd find there is very little.
    >
    >> However, My system works fine now, at least until I load Blender, which
    >> then eats up the last of my 4GB of RAM ....

    >
    > man top and look at the '-m' command to see what's eating memory.
    > '/bin/ps' will also provide clues - especially if your memory hogs are
    > consuming more than one or two hundred lines in a 'top' display.
    >
    > As far as compiling a lean/mean kernel, wander over to the Linux
    > Documentation Project (http://tldp.org/guides.html), and look for the
    > kernel documentation.
    >
    > [compton ~]$ grep ' \*' temp/new/guides.txt.01.04.07 | grep -i kernel
    > * The Linux Kernel Module Programming Guide
    > * Linux Kernel 2.4 Internals
    > * The Linux Kernel Hackers' Guide
    > * The Linux Kernel
    > [compton ~]$
    >
    > Yes, you can make a leaner system. This is the rational for the 'gentoo'
    > distribution, where you install a very minimalist startup system, and
    > then compile EVERYTHING for lean/mean. Takes a lot more effort, and
    > makes you responsible for any security problems - as your system is now
    > more-or-less unique.
    >
    >> Here is an example -- Kleepsweep found over 4,000 duplicated files on my
    >> system:

    >
    > I think you'll find a lot of those are due to installing *-devel*
    > packages on your system, and most of those are not in real-time use.
    > Try 'rpm -qa | grep devel' and see how many of those packages you
    > have. Generally, they're only required when compiling/building stuff.
    >
    > Old guy
    >



    Thanks Moe, I've printed off your replies to my query and am now working
    my way through the tutorial.

    Many thanks to you and others,

    Dave


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