Where to buy linux CDs? - Help

This is a discussion on Where to buy linux CDs? - Help ; So I've got a urge to buy Debian. I'm attracted to dpkg (apt, etc.) and the possibility of having an easy way to keep my computer up-to-date, and a distro that does the same. I think that Debian will get ...

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Thread: Where to buy linux CDs?

  1. Where to buy linux CDs?

    So I've got a urge to buy Debian. I'm attracted to dpkg
    (apt, etc.) and the possibility of having an easy way
    to keep my computer up-to-date, and a distro that does
    the same. I think that Debian will get me closer to that
    state than the other distros, including Ubuntu.

    So the next question is, where do I buy the CDs?

    Debian lists lots of resellers, and I hardly know anything
    about most of them. Except that I know a cousin of mine
    used LinuxCentral and was satisfied; also I searched for
    some comments about various resellers on various web forums
    and have seen some satisfied and unsatisfied comments, and
    I've seen a complaint that EasyLinuxCDs has slow delivery
    times because they're in Canada.

    http://www.debian.org/CD/vendors/#us

    Has anyone had any good or bad experiences with any
    of these resellers? I'd like a reseller in the US, who
    stands behind the CDs that they sell (defects with the CD,
    not defects with the software), and price is a factor,
    of course.

    --
    Life is guaranteed to change, which
    gives us the opportunity to improve.
    __/_ _ _ Life is also guaranteed to end, which
    _) /(- \/(- _) . gives urgency to our goals.
    -----------------------------------------------------------

  2. Re: Where to buy linux CDs?

    "Steve S." wrote in message
    > news:11de8$44ce2ec8$ce946c3b$3590@DIALUPUSA.NET...
    > So I've got a urge to buy Debian. I'm attracted to dpkg
    > (apt, etc.) and the possibility of having an easy way
    > to keep my computer up-to-date, and a distro that does
    > the same. I think that Debian will get me closer to that
    > state than the other distros, including Ubuntu.
    >
    > So the next question is, where do I buy the CDs?




    Do you not have access to a fast Internet connection?
    and a cdr or dvdr burner?

    Get the cd's from a friend or user group in your area.
    Don't buy them. Just make sure whoever makes them
    does validate them before you use them. That way if
    you run into problems, it won't be the cd/dvd's.

    You can get the Internet install cd if your connection has
    sufficient speed.

    Keeping Ubuntu updated is a snap. It does it automatically,
    (like auto update in XP).

    Since you didn't say what kind of hardware you plan to run
    there are lots of possibilities. You also didn't say if you are
    client oriented or server oriented.

    On the server side I would suggest keeping up with RH, Suse,
    Ubuntu and Debian. For the client side I would keep up with
    Ubuntu and Debian if you want. For the moment RH has the
    biggest chunk of the server market but that mey change with
    the new releases of Ubuntu.

    later,
    charles......



  3. Re: Where to buy linux CDs?

    Steve S. wrote:
    > So I've got a urge to buy Debian. I'm attracted to dpkg
    > (apt, etc.) and the possibility of having an easy way
    > to keep my computer up-to-date, and a distro that does
    > the same. I think that Debian will get me closer to that
    > state than the other distros, including Ubuntu.
    >
    > So the next question is, where do I buy the CDs?


    It might be the wrong question. Have you noticed that Linux
    CD-publishing is a much smaller business than it used to be? There are
    reasons for that:

    o Everyone now has access to cheap, reliable CD burners and media.
    Most people have at least 56kbps modem access to the Internet,
    which in the USA and Canada (at least) is cheap and reliable.

    o Everyone now knows how to verify that you did a good download
    (checking the MD5 or SHA1 hash value) and a good burn (checking
    cdrecord output).

    o People learned the hard way that the CDs you get from mail order CD
    vendors often turn out to be either outdated or prerelease versions.
    Plus, they take a long time to reach you, and you have to pay the media
    cost, vendor markup, and shipping.

    A full CD is about 701MB, and you need only disk1 to do a reasonable
    Debian install. Admittedly, that's a long download on modem dial-up --
    but maybe you can leave the dial-up session running? Or maybe you have
    broadband access?

    Download the .iso file's accompanying md5sum file, and (if on a Linux
    or other *ix box) check like this: "md5sum -c md5sumfilename"

    Experienced Debianistas tend (or at least, those with reliable and
    fairly decent Internet access) tend to use the small "netinst" images,
    instead. These weigh in at only around 100MB, and include only the
    essential core required to run the installer. Why? Well, software on a
    distro CD image is likely to be slightly outdated and soon be replaced
    by downloaded update packages anyway, so why not skip the overstuffed
    CD contents and fetch current packages directly from the online
    package mirrors, instead?

    I haven't used a CD vendor in quite a few years, personally, and think
    of them as a middle-90s sort of thing.

    --
    Cheers, Your eyes are weary from staring at the CRT. You feel
    Rick Moen sleepy. Notice how restful it is to watch the cursor
    rick@linuxmafia.com blink. Close your eyes. The opinions stated above are
    yours. You cannot imagine why you ever felt otherwise.

  4. Re: Where to buy linux CDs?

    On Thursday 03 August 2006 4:48, ***** charles
    wrote:
    > "Steve S." wrote in
    > message
    >> news:11de8$44ce2ec8$ce946c3b$3590@DIALUPUSA.NET...
    >> So I've got a urge to buy Debian. I'm attracted to dpkg
    >> (apt, etc.) and the possibility of having an easy way
    >> to keep my computer up-to-date, and a distro that does
    >> the same. I think that Debian will get me closer to that
    >> state than the other distros, including Ubuntu.
    >>
    >> So the next question is, where do I buy the CDs?

    >
    >
    > Do you not have access to a fast Internet connection?
    > and a cdr or dvdr burner?
    >
    > Get the cd's from a friend or user group in your area.
    > Don't buy them.


    I've downloaded a Linux distro before through my 56k
    modem and it took two weeks (maybe 500 MB), including
    disconnects. My local LUG (CINLUG) likes Ubuntu, and I
    don't like Ubuntu. I've got a CD burner and no decent
    way to label them, just a sharpie. And, BTW, I'm not
    shopping for a way to label them either. Therefore I will
    be buying some nice thermally labeled, commercially burned,
    USPS delivered CD-ROMs (and not DVDs).


    > Just make sure whoever makes them
    > does validate them before you use them. That way if
    > you run into problems, it won't be the cd/dvd's.
    >


    Yes, I'm discovering that. But basically the resellers
    have got to watch their costs in order to keep operating
    and so their QA habits tend toward testing a burnt
    disk every once-in-a-while, or perhaps using a more
    statistically significant rate than that. I'm asking them
    for who manufactures their discs, and they just give me
    a vague "We use quality manufacturers" sort of answers,
    so far.

    And before you write, know that I have already read
    about the cyanine, phthalocyanine, and metalized azo
    dyes and read about their colors, and read about their
    patent owners, and read that the shorter data-life that
    one of them was addressed by adding some preservative,
    and read about the fact that the dye based CDs haven't
    been around long enough to actually know, with certainty,
    that they would hold data for 10 or 100 years, and so
    manufactures claims (as always) should be taken with
    skepticism, especially when they make bold absolute claims
    such as "This CD WILL..." rather than a reasonable "The
    CD probably will...".

    Read the cdrfaq or other google results if you want to
    learn about those topics: http://www.cdrfaq.org/faq07.html


    > You can get the Internet install cd if your connection has
    > sufficient speed.
    >
    > Keeping Ubuntu updated is a snap. It does it
    > automatically, (like auto update in XP).
    >


    What's XP?

    Here is one of the top misunderstandings in this thread.
    "Keeping Ubuntu updated is a snap." Updated with what?
    Updated corresponding to what? Matching who's Linux?
    Who's, Ubuntu's Linux? Updating Ubuntu to match the latest
    Ubuntu is a snap? (And I know that getting Ubuntu discs
    is a snap too.) But the misunderstanding here is that I
    don't want to be updated with Ubuntu's Linux nor anyone's
    else's distribution. Instead I want to be updated with
    the original software author's code, and not the distro's
    version of it. And it is Debian that gives me the best
    chance of being up-to-date with the software author, due to
    the near ubiquity of their .deb file (as opposed to the RPM
    ..spec file's lack of ubiquity after years of popularity).
    So, that decision has already been made.

    All Ubuntus, Red Hats, SCOs (a.k.a. "Linux is a copy
    of our Unix, IBM! Now show is the proof of that IBM!)
    , Mandrivas, Suses, etc. are off my list. My list of
    distros is effectively closed. Although, Puppy (because
    it's small and a live CD), Progeny (because they seem to
    have my concern about Linux), and perhaps Slackware's
    work with managing tar.gzs might catch my attention.
    Which leads to the second misunderstanding of this thread.
    I have seen the many "Which to buy?" threads on Google
    groups search and don't want another one of them, but
    instead want a "Where to buy?" thread which the Linus
    Usenet groups have very little of.

    So, please to send this thread your good and bad
    experiences with resellers.


    > Since you didn't say what kind of hardware you plan to run
    > there are lots of possibilities. You also didn't say if
    > you are client oriented or server oriented.
    >
    >

    ---snip---8x---snip---8x---snip---8x---snip---8x---snip---8x---
    > later,
    > charles......
    >


    I didn't say that I run a PII-350 MHz, 1999, home PC, for
    email, amateur flyer design, amateur web design because
    those are criteria in choosing a distro and that choice
    has been made already. So the next question is: Where
    to buy? Thank you Charles for trying to be so helpful,
    and upholding the fine and proud reputation that the Linux
    community has of helping n00bies, with intelligent, sage,
    and accurate advice. But instead of that if you have any
    good/bad personal experiences then please send them into
    this thread.


    On Thursday 03 August 2006 5:45, Rick Moen
    wrote:
    > Steve S. wrote:
    >>
    >> So the next question is, where do I buy the CDs?

    >
    > It might be the wrong question.


    But it isn't the wrong question, it is precisely correct.
    That is the third big misunderstanding of this thread,
    that the newbie sounding question that I posted means
    that I am a noowbie. So my explanation of how I choose
    Debian didn't help to dispel all of your expectations that
    anyone asking a question here must be a noooooobie. But I
    have run Linux for years and have the normal love/hate
    relationship with Tux the mascot penguin (unlike the
    abnormal sick and twisted hate/hate relationship that I
    had with Windows) and so I am not a newooobie, but am
    an electrical engineer with a bit of a hacker impulse
    who wants to be closer to the bleeding edge than what
    Mandriva and the like are rumored to protect us from.
    So lets try to move past the kind-hearted and generous
    advice-to-the-gnubie and get personal.

    Get personal by sending, to here, your personal good and
    bad experiences with Linux resellers who you've bought
    burned CDs from.


    > Have you noticed that Linux
    > CD-publishing is a much smaller business than it used to
    > be? There are reasons for that:
    >
    > o Everyone now has access to cheap, reliable CD burners
    > and media.
    > Most people have at least 56kbps modem access to the
    > Internet, which in the USA and Canada (at least) is
    > cheap and reliable.
    >
    > o Everyone now knows how to verify that you did a good
    > download
    > (checking the MD5 or SHA1 hash value) and a good burn
    > (checking cdrecord output).
    >
    > o People learned the hard way that the CDs you get from
    > mail order CD
    > vendors often turn out to be either outdated or
    > prerelease versions. Plus, they take a long time to
    > reach you, and you have to pay the media cost, vendor
    > markup, and shipping.
    >


    Do you know that current data, and history? I've never
    heard most of that, before.

    On that last point, I realize how out-dated my previous
    distros' (Red Hat 5.1, Caldera eDesktop 2.4, Caldera eD
    3.1, Ubuntu 5.10) packages have been with the software
    authors, which is exactly what I'm trying to avoid
    by avoiding any of the secondary and tertiary distros.
    And I think that the resellers that I'm looking at do have
    a real dedication to the latest distro version, and that
    they discount their over stock of obsoleted versions.
    Debian 3.1r2 is recent enough for me, and Debian 4.0
    doesn't come out until Dec. 2006 (where 8,000 packages are
    supposed to be updated) and I won't wait that long to buy.

    I'm looking at these next resellers, and judging
    them based on the criteria of: do they have a postal
    address?, price, labeling technology (ink-jet, silkscreen,
    thermal, adhesive, etc.), shipping charge, delivery time,
    third-party payment verification (Paypal, etc.), customer
    privacy respected and secured, do they offer education on
    their site?, and reputation...

    http://www.LinuxOnline.biz
    http://www.osdisc.com
    http://www.easylinuxcds.com
    http://linuxcdrs.com
    http://www.frozentech.com
    http://linuxcentral.com
    http://www.cheapbytes.com

    (cheapbytes tells me that, "We have been in business
    over 10 years now and quite literally have served tens of
    thousands of customers." I wonder if that's true?)


    > A full CD is about 701MB, and you need only disk1 to do a
    > reasonable
    > Debian install.


    Sure, thanx, I know. But the ~$25 price for 24 Debian
    CDs is an attractive deal for me and my 56K phone modem.
    My ISP has been kicking me offline lately, probably due
    to my connection times lasting 4-5 hours.


    > Experienced Debianistas tend... tend to use
    > the small "netinst" images,...
    >
    > ... software on a distro CD image is likely to be slightly
    > outdated and soon be replaced by downloaded update
    > packages anyway,


    That could be attractive, I've heard of Debian's net
    install but haven't done it before. Maybe I'll try,
    and make a larger donation to Debian. But I do want
    some CDs to work from when looking for packages.


    >
    > I haven't used a CD vendor in quite a few years,
    > personally, and think of them as a middle-90s sort of
    > thing.
    >


    Maybe me and this thread are just out-dated.

    But if not, then post your good and bad personal
    experiences of buying Linux CDs, answering the "Where to
    buy" question, everyone.

    - steve s.


  5. Re: Where to buy linux CDs?

    On 08/04/2006 10:16 PM, Steve S. wrote:
    > [...]
    > So, please to send this thread your good and bad
    > experiences with resellers.
    > [...]



    http://www.edmunds-enterprises.com/ is good.



  6. Re: Where to buy linux CDs?

    Thanks to all.

    I went blindly ahead after reading Dave Mann's posting and had no
    problem at all. All is well.

    Old guy, I'm going to take your advice about the newsgroup.

    Again, thanks all.

    On Mon, 31 Jul 2006 12:24:44 -0400, Steve S.
    wrote:

    >So I've got a urge to buy Debian. I'm attracted to dpkg
    >(apt, etc.) and the possibility of having an easy way
    >to keep my computer up-to-date, and a distro that does
    >the same. I think that Debian will get me closer to that
    >state than the other distros, including Ubuntu.
    >
    >So the next question is, where do I buy the CDs?
    >
    >Debian lists lots of resellers, and I hardly know anything
    >about most of them. Except that I know a cousin of mine
    >used LinuxCentral and was satisfied; also I searched for
    >some comments about various resellers on various web forums
    >and have seen some satisfied and unsatisfied comments, and
    >I've seen a complaint that EasyLinuxCDs has slow delivery
    >times because they're in Canada.
    >
    >http://www.debian.org/CD/vendors/#us
    >
    >Has anyone had any good or bad experiences with any
    >of these resellers? I'd like a reseller in the US, who
    >stands behind the CDs that they sell (defects with the CD,
    >not defects with the software), and price is a factor,
    >of course.



  7. Re: Where to buy linux CDs?

    < snip >

    > So, please to send this thread your good and bad
    > experiences with resellers.


    If you had said upfront that you were experienced
    my answer would have been different. All questions
    are assumed to come from beginners unless otherwise
    stated.

    My experience with resellers was a long time ago and
    I suspect this is similar to others who are "experienced".
    Most of us now have fast Internet connections or
    friends with fast connections or access to user groups
    in our local geographical area and we also have burners
    (especially now that they are under $30). I dumped my
    dialup account just at the end of last year with a 3Mbs
    DSL line. Downloading iso's only takes about 40 min.

    By the way, I like Ubuntu and have installed it on
    "a lot" of computers. I have also used it to convert a
    lot of Windows people both advanced and beginners.
    None have gone back. Ubuntu usually works best on
    solid hardware.

    So back to answering your original question. I don't
    know since I have done no purchasing of cd's for over
    6 or 7 years. The problem you are facing is that most/
    all of the people who provide answers in a newsgroup
    like this are in a similar boat. I did purchase a big
    "pack" of cd's from a vendor that is no longer in business.
    But I had no troubles.

    Most of the other Linux guru's whom I know use either
    Red Hat, Suse, or Debian. If they need the support it is
    RH or Suse. If they don't it is Debian. I find Debian to
    be more flexible and stable where I can implement it in
    a wider variety of environments/solutions.

    later,
    charles.....



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