Cleaning out the old HD - Help

This is a discussion on Cleaning out the old HD - Help ; I have a great operating FC3 install on a box I use in my workshop. /dev/hda is a 20GB 10,000 rpm drive and /dev/hdb is a 100GB 7,500 rpm drive. I am happy with everything EXCEPT all of the "try ...

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  1. Cleaning out the old HD

    I have a great operating FC3 install on a box I use in my
    workshop. /dev/hda is a 20GB 10,000 rpm drive and /dev/hdb is a 100GB
    7,500 rpm drive.

    I am happy with everything EXCEPT all of the "try out" applications I have
    downloaded and then fiddled with.

    I have a list (actually a ****pot as we say here in the South) of
    application folders just taking up potential free space.

    I've tried the rpm command to seek out and delete rpm's but there still
    seems to be a lot of loose stuff around.

    #1 I would like to just go to the folder, say "jabber", or "winetools" where
    I downloaded the application and then used the make routine to install it.
    After discovering that what ever the program was, either didn't work right
    or I didn't like it or didn't need it, I want to douche it away.

    What to do? What to do?

    TIA,

    Dave




    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Study History - Know the Future

  2. Re: Cleaning out the old HD

    On Mon, 05 Jun 2006 21:13:07 -0500, CWO4 Dave Mann Cried: Read These Runes!:
    > I have a great operating FC3 install on a box I use in my
    > workshop. /dev/hda is a 20GB 10,000 rpm drive and /dev/hdb is a 100GB
    > 7,500 rpm drive.
    >
    > I am happy with everything EXCEPT all of the "try out" applications I have
    > downloaded and then fiddled with.
    >
    > I have a list (actually a ****pot as we say here in the South) of
    > application folders just taking up potential free space.
    >
    > I've tried the rpm command to seek out and delete rpm's but there still
    > seems to be a lot of loose stuff around.
    >
    > #1 I would like to just go to the folder, say "jabber", or "winetools" where
    > I downloaded the application and then used the make routine to install it.
    > After discovering that what ever the program was, either didn't work right
    > or I didn't like it or didn't need it, I want to douche it away.


    A couple of things I do.

    I build a lot of trial stuff. I always build in /usr/local/src so that
    keeps things fairly centralized as far as source and config files go.
    Additionally I look at Makefiles to see if there is a make uninstall. If
    not, make -n install > install.log so I have a record of what went where if
    I need to remove by hand. If you were using slackware you could use a
    utility like checkinstall to make a removable slackware package. FC should
    have a similar method of making home rolled rpms.

    Just some thoughts.

    Thorn
    --
    Worst Vegetable of the Year:
    The brussels sprout. This is also the worst vegetable of next
    year.
    -- Steve Rubenstein

  3. Re: Cleaning out the old HD

    On Mon, 05 Jun 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in article
    <1265580.ugYkjQADaU@Fedora.Core.Three.Linux.System>, CWO4 Dave Mann wrote:

    >I have a list (actually a ****pot as we say here in the South) of
    >application folders just taking up potential free space.


    Normal procedure here is to build the package as a non-user (I use one
    called 'builder' that owns nothing except the /usr/local/src/, which is
    where we do unpacking and building of tarballs and other sources). This
    user has no 'write' permission outside of the build directory. When it's
    time to install a compiled tarball, become root, and touch a file like
    'touchstone', then run the 'make install' then IMMEDIATELY run a find
    to verify where stuff got put:

    find / -newer ./touchstone -exec ls -ld {} \; > ./where.it.went

    I say 'verify' because you _do_ read those makefiles at least, don't
    you?

    >I've tried the rpm command to seek out and delete rpm's but there still
    >seems to be a lot of loose stuff around.


    'rpm -e' should remove all vestiges of an rpm installed binary package, but
    does nothing for rpm source packages, never mind tarballs.

    >#1 I would like to just go to the folder, say "jabber", or "winetools" where
    >I downloaded the application and then used the make routine to install it.
    >After discovering that what ever the program was, either didn't work right
    >or I didn't like it or didn't need it, I want to douche it away.


    The better makefiles have an 'uninstall' target, so 'make uninstall' should
    remove the stuff that got installed. Then, remove the source directory.

    No 'uninstall' target? Fine - read the makefile and see what the
    install command is going to do, and reverse that.

    Lost the makefile? OK, find the binary that you compiled - hopefully,
    it's in /usr/local/bin/ or something like that. Use the find command
    to find files with the same date. Use the date command to figure out how
    many days ago the reference file is:

    [compton ~]$ date +%D --date="10 days ago"
    05/27/06
    [compton ~]$ date +%D --date="100 days ago"
    02/26/06
    [compton ~]$ date +%D --date="1000 days ago"
    09/10/03
    [compton ~]$

    then use 'find / -ctime 100 -daystart -exec ls -ld {} \;' to find files and
    what-not created that day. Not much fun, but incentive to be more careful
    the next time. See the man pages for these commands to see what I'm doing.

    >What to do? What to do?


    Audit the source files beforehand - then use the 'touchstone' and 'find'
    trick to see what got installed where. Note that if the binary is downloading
    other stuff, creating logs, and similar crap, this won't show up in any of
    these methods - but you should know what's going on with your system. My
    home systems are pretty stable, but there is a weekly cron job that runs a
    'find' over the file system to locate changed/new stuff that occurred during
    the previous week.

    Old guy

  4. Re: Cleaning out the old HD

    Moe Trin wrote:

    > On Mon, 05 Jun 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in
    > article <1265580.ugYkjQADaU@Fedora.Core.Three.Linux.System>, CWO4 Dave
    > Mann wrote:
    >
    >>I have a list (actually a ****pot as we say here in the South) of
    >>application folders just taking up potential free space.

    >
    > Normal procedure here is to build the package as a non-user (I use one
    > called 'builder' that owns nothing except the /usr/local/src/, which is
    > where we do unpacking and building of tarballs and other sources). This
    > user has no 'write' permission outside of the build directory. When it's
    > time to install a compiled tarball, become root, and touch a file like
    > 'touchstone', then run the 'make install' then IMMEDIATELY run a find
    > to verify where stuff got put:
    >
    > find / -newer ./touchstone -exec ls -ld {} \; > ./where.it.went
    >
    > I say 'verify' because you _do_ read those makefiles at least, don't
    > you?
    >
    >>I've tried the rpm command to seek out and delete rpm's but there still
    >>seems to be a lot of loose stuff around.

    >
    > 'rpm -e' should remove all vestiges of an rpm installed binary package,
    > but does nothing for rpm source packages, never mind tarballs.
    >
    >>#1 I would like to just go to the folder, say "jabber", or "winetools"
    >>#where
    >>I downloaded the application and then used the make routine to install it.
    >>After discovering that what ever the program was, either didn't work right
    >>or I didn't like it or didn't need it, I want to douche it away.

    >
    > The better makefiles have an 'uninstall' target, so 'make uninstall'
    > should remove the stuff that got installed. Then, remove the source
    > directory.
    >
    > No 'uninstall' target? Fine - read the makefile and see what the
    > install command is going to do, and reverse that.
    >
    > Lost the makefile? OK, find the binary that you compiled - hopefully,
    > it's in /usr/local/bin/ or something like that. Use the find command
    > to find files with the same date. Use the date command to figure out how
    > many days ago the reference file is:
    >
    > [compton ~]$ date +%D --date="10 days ago"
    > 05/27/06
    > [compton ~]$ date +%D --date="100 days ago"
    > 02/26/06
    > [compton ~]$ date +%D --date="1000 days ago"
    > 09/10/03
    > [compton ~]$
    >
    > then use 'find / -ctime 100 -daystart -exec ls -ld {} \;' to find files
    > and
    > what-not created that day. Not much fun, but incentive to be more
    > careful
    > the next time. See the man pages for these commands to see what I'm
    > doing.
    >
    >>What to do? What to do?

    >
    > Audit the source files beforehand - then use the 'touchstone' and 'find'
    > trick to see what got installed where. Note that if the binary is
    > downloading other stuff, creating logs, and similar crap, this won't show
    > up in any of
    > these methods - but you should know what's going on with your system. My
    > home systems are pretty stable, but there is a weekly cron job that runs a
    > 'find' over the file system to locate changed/new stuff that occurred
    > during the previous week.
    >
    > Old guy




    Hooo Boy ....

    Did I learn a lot in these two messages.

    First: I am a clueless packrat and "make" freak;

    Second: I have a LOT of work ahead of me;

    Third: WHY do I never read the instructions first?

    Now, in the September of my Years, I wonder if perhaps I should just take
    my /home folder and load FC4 on a clean drive. I know, this smacks so much
    of Effing Windows behavior .. and I apologize in advance for the rapid
    surrender to the Redmond Disease -- when in doubt, re-install. At least
    I'll get an FC4 system in place of a perfectly well running FC3 (... 254)
    system ....

    I am going to go ruminate .. back to you all tomorrow ....

    Cheers,

    Dave





    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Study History - Know the Future

  5. Re: Cleaning out the old HD

    On Tue, 06 Jun 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in article
    <3252328.xcdGIohk5z@Fedora.Core.Three.Linux.System>, CWO4 Dave Mann wrote:

    >Hooo Boy ....
    >
    >Did I learn a lot in these two messages.
    >
    >First: I am a clueless packrat and "make" freak;


    Hmmm, you're new in this racket? Remember those old RP06 diskpacks?
    That's why I'm still in the habit of being rather frugal with diskspace.

    Depending on your skill level, there is nothing wrong with using tarballs
    and 'make'. It certainly gives you access to a _much_ wider selection of
    neet stuff. I'm a network admin - I have six different applications that
    will do a traceroute, in addition to Van Jacobson's original LBL version.
    Each offer somewhat different features. A quick grep at ibiblio.org
    (formerly metalab.unc.edu, and before that sunsite.unc.edu) shows some
    650 rpms, 260 debs, and over 8000 tarballs. If you are familiar with the
    old sunsite, this excludes the /pub/Linux/distributions/ tree that has
    been moved to a different server.

    >Second: I have a LOT of work ahead of me;


    "that depends" - if you still have the makefiles, it often takes less than
    a minute to scan through it (uninstall target? oh, this will be quick - or
    seeing what the install target did, which may require a bit of extra time
    to translate, but is still relatively quick), and get the job done. If you
    have used the 'touchstone/find' trick, things may even be quicker. The
    drudgery comes in when you have no makefile, and have to (effectively) do
    the job by hand.

    >Third: WHY do I never read the instructions first?


    Human nature

    >Now, in the September of my Years, I wonder if perhaps I should just take
    >my /home folder and load FC4 on a clean drive. I know, this smacks so much
    >of Effing Windows behavior .. and I apologize in advance for the rapid
    >surrender to the Redmond Disease -- when in doubt, re-install. At least
    >I'll get an FC4 system in place of a perfectly well running FC3 (... 254)
    >system ....


    You're going to hate me for this...

    [compton ~]$ df -ah /home/ibuprofin
    Filesystem Size Used Avail Capacity Mounted on
    /dev/hda7 595M 524M 40M 93% /home
    [compton ~]$ du -sm /home/ibuprofin
    72 /home/ibuprofin
    [compton ~]$

    Home is on a separate partition - there's actually six users sharing that
    space. Another partition is /usr/local/src/archive (which has a list of
    where I found packages in addition to the source tarballs), while
    /usr/local/src/ itself is another partition. I don't do upgrade type
    installs. Just unmount the "special" partitions, pop in the CD/DVD, and
    have it install over the old system. Afterwards, create the mount points
    for the "special" partitions and entries in /etc/fstab, and away we go.

    As for The September of my Years, unless you remember the original Walter
    Huston version, or even the Bing Crosby (1946) or the _much_ later Jimmy
    Durante version (Frank Sinatra is a newbie), you may not be as far gone
    as you think - see the geriatrician, and maybe they can help. ;-)

    >I am going to go ruminate .. back to you all tomorrow ....


    Somehow, I'm hearing Bugs Bunny singing "Good night, sweet dreams, tomorrow's
    another day, till then, sweet dreams, good night" (Hair Raining Hare - 1945)

    Old guy

  6. Re: Cleaning out the old HD

    Moe Trin wrote:

    > On Tue, 06 Jun 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in
    > article <3252328.xcdGIohk5z@Fedora.Core.Three.Linux.System>, CWO4 Dave
    > Mann wrote:
    >
    >>Hooo Boy ....
    >>
    >>Did I learn a lot in these two messages.
    >>
    >>First: I am a clueless packrat and "make" freak;

    >
    > Hmmm, you're new in this racket? Remember those old RP06 diskpacks?
    > That's why I'm still in the habit of being rather frugal with diskspace.


    Not new, but new in the sense that I am finally trying to be organized.
    Previously I have done BeOS, QNX, Linux as far back as the early 90's ...
    all in a kind of "botique" manner. Meaning I would download, say QNX.
    Install it, dick around with it, say, Oh, ok, that's nice ... or what ever
    and then move on.

    Sort of an ADD hobby ...

    Now that my business system have all been placed on a Linux machine (per my
    Ukase, of course), I have got to be a smart user. That is why I finally am
    checking out books from the library and actually reading the man and help
    files.

    Diskpacks ... OMG ... we ain't even going there ... the pain and agony of it
    all. :-)

    >
    > Depending on your skill level, there is nothing wrong with using tarballs
    > and 'make'. It certainly gives you access to a _much_ wider selection of
    > neet stuff. I'm a network admin - I have six different applications that
    > will do a traceroute, in addition to Van Jacobson's original LBL version.
    > Each offer somewhat different features. A quick grep at ibiblio.org
    > (formerly metalab.unc.edu, and before that sunsite.unc.edu) shows some
    > 650 rpms, 260 debs, and over 8000 tarballs. If you are familiar with the
    > old sunsite, this excludes the /pub/Linux/distributions/ tree that has
    > been moved to a different server.
    >
    >>Second: I have a LOT of work ahead of me;

    >
    > "that depends" - if you still have the makefiles, it often takes less than
    > a minute to scan through it (uninstall target? oh, this will be quick -
    > or seeing what the install target did, which may require a bit of extra
    > time to translate, but is still relatively quick), and get the job done.
    > If you
    > have used the 'touchstone/find' trick, things may even be quicker. The
    > drudgery comes in when you have no makefile, and have to (effectively) do
    > the job by hand.
    >
    >>Third: WHY do I never read the instructions first?

    >
    > Human nature
    >
    >>Now, in the September of my Years, I wonder if perhaps I should just take
    >>my /home folder and load FC4 on a clean drive. I know, this smacks so
    >>much of Effing Windows behavior .. and I apologize in advance for the
    >>rapid
    >>surrender to the Redmond Disease -- when in doubt, re-install. At least
    >>I'll get an FC4 system in place of a perfectly well running FC3 (... 254)
    >>system ....

    >
    > You're going to hate me for this...
    >
    > [compton ~]$ df -ah /home/ibuprofin
    > Filesystem Size Used Avail Capacity Mounted on
    > /dev/hda7 595M 524M 40M 93% /home
    > [compton ~]$ du -sm /home/ibuprofin
    > 72 /home/ibuprofin
    > [compton ~]$
    >
    > Home is on a separate partition - there's actually six users sharing that
    > space. Another partition is /usr/local/src/archive (which has a list of
    > where I found packages in addition to the source tarballs), while
    > /usr/local/src/ itself is another partition. I don't do upgrade type
    > installs. Just unmount the "special" partitions, pop in the CD/DVD, and
    > have it install over the old system. Afterwards, create the mount points
    > for the "special" partitions and entries in /etc/fstab, and away we go.
    >


    Wow .. I am impressed ...

    > As for The September of my Years, unless you remember the original Walter
    > Huston version, or even the Bing Crosby (1946) or the _much_ later Jimmy
    > Durante version (Frank Sinatra is a newbie), you may not be as far gone
    > as you think - see the geriatrician, and maybe they can help. ;-)
    >


    Born in 1944 ... duck tail hair teenager ... etc ...

    >>I am going to go ruminate .. back to you all tomorrow ....

    >
    > Somehow, I'm hearing Bugs Bunny singing "Good night, sweet dreams,
    > tomorrow's
    > another day, till then, sweet dreams, good night" (Hair Raining Hare -
    > 1945)
    >
    > Old guy


    "Good Night, Mrs. Calabash -- Wherever you are ..... "




    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Study History - Know the Future

  7. Re: Cleaning out the old HD

    On Wed, 07 Jun 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in article
    <1795325.rZ1nQlufxI@Fedora.Core.Three.Linux.System>, CWO4 Dave Mann wrote:

    >Not new, but new in the sense that I am finally trying to be organized.


    What the heck do you want to do _that_ for???

    >Install it, dick around with it, say, Oh, ok, that's nice ... or what ever
    >and then move on.


    That's the way you actually discover what it is that will work for you.
    Not all software (and hardware) "fits" every individual.

    >Now that my business system have all been placed on a Linux machine (per my
    >Ukase, of course), I have got to be a smart user. That is why I finally am
    >checking out books from the library and actually reading the man and help
    >files.


    Only thing wrong with that is that dead trees tend to be a minimum of six
    months behind the "current" software. If you're looking at O'Reilly books
    like "Internet Core Protocols", or "IPv6 Network Administration", that's
    probably OK - but something like "Knoppix Hacks" is probably out of date
    (was released in late 2004, and probably written early that year).

    >Diskpacks ... OMG ... we ain't even going there ... the pain and agony of it
    >all. :-)


    Sorry to remind you - last one I saw _running_ was in 1994.

    >Born in 1944 ... duck tail hair teenager ... etc ...


    Young whipper-snapper!

    Depends where - we had TV in the New York metro area by 1946 (someplace in
    my sister's house, there is still a seven inch Admiral table-top - slightly
    larger than a full sized PC-AT case - that was my first TV in the 1950s),
    but I guess that means "The Lone Ranger", "Gene Autry", and "Roy Rogers" on
    the radio (you're probably to young for "The Shadow" or "Jack Armstrong")
    and maybe "Sky King" or "Captain Midnight" - know where your secret
    decoding ring (that cost you _four_ box-tops) is? ;-)

    >"Good Night, Mrs. Calabash -- Wherever you are ..... "


    "Ink, a dinka dink, a dinka dink a dinka doo!" He died in 1980 - the last
    picture he did was "Mad Mad World" in 1963 when he was 70, (well, he also
    dies in that picture, but...) and he did some more TV voice work after
    that into the late 1960s. His radio stuff goes back to the 30's and
    early/mid 40s. I recently came across a picture of him standing with
    one foot on the running board of his late 30's Packard (I think) roadster
    wearing a black suit - big cigar hanging out of his mouth - looked like
    the perfect model for a 30's affiliate of Al Capone.

    Old guy

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