KMail - Help

This is a discussion on KMail - Help ; For the past week, KMail has not been able to connect to the smtp servers (I have tried 3). Thunderbird works. KMail worked for about 18 months and then suddenly could not connect to the smtp servers. Any ideas on ...

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Thread: KMail

  1. KMail

    For the past week, KMail has not been able to connect to the smtp
    servers (I have tried 3). Thunderbird works. KMail worked for about 18
    months and then suddenly could not connect to the smtp servers.

    Any ideas on how to get it connecting again.

    Thanks,
    Terry
    --
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++
    ================================================== ====
    ************************************************** ****
    If you are always rushing towards the future,
    Then you never have any Now.

    Terry
    ************************************************** ****
    Paraphrasing Ben Franklin:

    Those who sacrifice freedom for safety, have neither.

    The exact quote:

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
    temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790),
    US author, diplomat, inventor, physicist, politician, & printer
    Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

    ************************************************** ****

  2. Re: KMail

    On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 16:58:07 -0500, "Terry D. Boldt"
    wrote:

    >Any ideas on how to get it connecting again.


    Check with your ISP. Your servers may now require authentication.

    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns

    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns
    Kill as many as you can; I have a morbid love of excess.
    http://www.lasfs.org http://home.earthlink.net/~sidebrnz
    http://www.lasfs.org http://home.earthlink.net/~sidebrnz

  3. Re: KMail

    Joe Zeff wrote:
    > On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 16:58:07 -0500, "Terry D. Boldt"
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Any ideas on how to get it connecting again.

    >
    >
    > Check with your ISP. Your servers may now require authentication.
    >


    Yes - they are great - they have a standard reply "We don't support
    Linux". I knew that when I signed up, but ANYTHING I ask, their reply is
    unwaveringly the same. I have now signed up with flxtek.net - they at
    least claim to support Linux. KMail doesn't work with them either, but
    Thunderbird does.

    I tried authentication on and off - no difference.

    I have noticed something rather odd though - When I check the KMail
    settings for the ISP, and click on the button to "check what the server
    supports" on the second page, then go back to the first page, the smpt
    port as been changed from 25 to something really weird, Not always the
    same port number. Like KMail is changing it to a random number, usually
    in the 400 range. This didn't happen that I noticed before. Maybe
    somehow, the KMail binary got whacked in some obscure fashion. If I
    could find the KMail configuration file, I would copy and delete and see
    if that changes anything.

    Unfortunately KMail is bundled in a whole bunch of other KDE apps, so
    upgrading KMail alone isn't practical (it is included in the kdepim
    package and upgrading that package is 74 MB which would take about 5 or
    6 hours to download). The one great flaw in KDE that I have discovered
    over the years. They bundle everything into VERY large packages. You get
    it all or upgrade all or nothing. This is insane unless you have
    broadband - DSL isn't an option and ComCast prices are equally insane.

    I have asked my vendor for a new drop on FC. Currently using FC3 and
    asked for a drop of their FC4 CD-ROMs. Beyond doing a new re-install of
    FC3, that is about the only solution I have come up with.

    Thanks,
    Terry

    --
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++
    ================================================== ====
    ************************************************** ****
    If you are always rushing towards the future,
    Then you never have any past.

    Terry Boldt
    ************************************************** ****
    Paraphrasing Ben Franklin:

    Those who sacrifice freedom for safety, have neither.

    The exact quote:

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
    temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790),
    US author, diplomat, inventor, physicist, politician, & printer
    Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

    ************************************************** ****

  4. Re: KMail

    On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 19:35:12 -0500, "Terry D. Boldt"
    wrote:

    >Yes - they are great - they have a standard reply "We don't support
    >Linux". I knew that when I signed up, but ANYTHING I ask, their reply is
    >unwaveringly the same. I have now signed up with flxtek.net - they at
    >least claim to support Linux. KMail doesn't work with them either, but
    >Thunderbird does.


    Don't tell them you're using Linux. Tell them that you're using XP
    and Outlook. The answer will probably be a set of "click here, click
    there" instructions, but you should be able to translate it into
    what's really going on. Either that, or find a copy of the old
    Fakemail faq and follow its instructions on how to log onto an SMTP
    server via Telnet and see what's really going on. Back when I did
    phone support for Earthlink, I had any number of callers do that
    simply because Outlook's error messages were useless.

    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns
    Debating unix flavors in the context of anything Microsoft is like
    talking about which ice cream flavor tastes least like sawdust with
    turpentine sauce.
    http://www.lasfs.org http://home.earthlink.net/~sidebrnz

  5. Re: KMail

    Joe Zeff wrote:
    > On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 19:35:12 -0500, "Terry D. Boldt"
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Yes - they are great - they have a standard reply "We don't support
    >> Linux". I knew that when I signed up, but ANYTHING I ask, their reply is
    >> unwaveringly the same. I have now signed up with flxtek.net - they at
    >> least claim to support Linux. KMail doesn't work with them either, but
    >> Thunderbird does.

    >
    > Don't tell them you're using Linux. Tell them that you're using XP
    > and Outlook. The answer will probably be a set of "click here, click
    > there" instructions, but you should be able to translate it into
    > what's really going on. Either that, or find a copy of the old
    > Fakemail faq and follow its instructions on how to log onto an SMTP
    > server via Telnet and see what's really going on. Back when I did
    > phone support for Earthlink, I had any number of callers do that
    > simply because Outlook's error messages were useless.
    >


    At the suggestion of PogoLinux (By the way this is an unabashed plug for
    PogoLinux. They have the BEST tech support I have encountered ANYWHERE
    and they actually do help - all of their tech support people are very
    knowledgeable) When you need a new Linux computer (workstation, server,
    etc) you cannot go wrong with PogoLinux. I have no financial interest in
    the company whatsoever. I am a really contented PogoLinux buyer and User).

    I tried telnet to the smtp servers: got the following:

    telnet smtp.intergate.com 25
    Trying 216.139.64.8...
    Connected to smtp.intergate.com (216.139.64.8).
    Escape character is '^]'.
    220 corpweb.trip.net ESMTP Sendmail 8.13.5/8.13.5; Thu, 2 Feb 2006
    09:35:37 -0600 (CST)
    quit
    221 2.0.0 corpweb.trip.net closing connection
    Connection closed by foreign host.

    So their smtp server appears to be working properly or at least it
    responded properly.

    Also, Thunderbird works okay with their smtp server - its only KMail and
    Evolution that don't.


    --
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++
    ================================================== ====
    ************************************************** ****
    If you are always rushing towards the future,
    Then you never have any past.

    Terry Boldt
    ************************************************** ****
    Paraphrasing Ben Franklin:

    Those who sacrifice freedom for safety, have neither.

    The exact quote:

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
    temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790),
    US author, diplomat, inventor, physicist, politician, & printer
    Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

    ************************************************** ****

  6. Re: KMail

    On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 11:25:02 -0500, "Terry D. Boldt"
    wrote:

    >So their smtp server appears to be working properly or at least it
    >responded properly.


    That tells you nothing except that it responds. Get the fakemail faq,
    read the instructions on how to log onto an SMTP server vial telnet
    and send an email message; it's not at all hard, I've done it hundreds
    of times. Then, log onto that server and try to send a message to
    yourself. See if it's accepted, and sent. If not, you'll see the
    error messages and know what's going on. Until you've done that, you
    have no idea why you're being refused access.

    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns
    Never give up! Never surrender!
    -Galaxy Quest
    http://www.lasfs.org http://home.earthlink.net/~sidebrnz

  7. Re: KMail

    On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 19:46:13 GMT, Joe Zeff
    wrote:

    >That tells you nothing except that it responds. Get the fakemail faq,
    >read the instructions on how to log onto an SMTP server vial telnet
    >and send an email message; it's not at all hard, I've done it hundreds
    >of times.


    Just in case you've had trouble finding it, here's the whole thing:

    (1) Can people send "fake" mail on the Internet?

    Yes. People can send mail that looks like it came from someone else.
    People can
    send mail that looks like it was received by more people than actually
    received
    it. HOWEVER, only very rarely is this mail truly indistinguishable
    from mail that
    really DID come from the person in question.

    In any case the ONLY real way to be completely sure a message is from
    a
    particular person is to have that person digitally "sign" the message
    with
    something like PGP.


    (2) How do you know if a message you have is "fake"?

    You can't always tell for sure. If the person was sloppy the message
    will have a
    line in the the header block (the text above the message with date and
    subject,
    etc information) that says something like "Apparently-To:". You can
    also compare
    the full headers of the message to the full set of headers on another
    message
    that you have received from that person. If they don't come close to
    matching
    then ONE OF THEM is probably "fake". Also look for computer names in
    the headers
    that have nothing to do with your information provider or his
    information
    provider.

    In order to be better able to spot fake mail you need to understand
    how it is
    sent. To do that see the section on sending fake mail below.

    The above don't always work. If the person sending the "fake" message
    is
    particularly crafty he can make the headers look so similar it is
    nearly
    impossible to catch. In this case you would have to ask the person who
    'sent' you
    the message whether or not it was really him.


    (3) Why is it possible to "fake" mail?

    It is possible to fake mail becuase all computer on the internet send
    mail around
    using something called SMTP - Simple Mail Transfer Protocal - and it
    is possible
    for a human to connect to a computer and pretend that it is another
    computer by
    speaking SMTP. This problem will not go away. Mail programs (both
    clients and
    SendMail servers) will probably learn to better recognize when someone
    is trying
    to send fake mail, but they will most likely never be able to detect
    EVERYTHING.


    (4) How can I "fake" mail?

    That is perhaps the question that is hardest to answer and will take
    the longest,
    so I will start with the basic and most detectable technique and work
    up to the
    most complicated and hard to detect technique. Of course, faking mail
    REALLY well
    is not such an easy and mechanical process. It requirs some amount of
    creativity
    in the techniques you apply. So, lets start with the basics....

    (a) The Basics

    To send fake mail you need to pretend that you are a computer
    transfering mail
    legitimatly. You start by telnetting to the SMTP socket (25) on the
    remote
    computer. For example, if I wanted to telnet to Cornell's SMTP port I
    would type
    the following from a UNIX prompt:
    -> telnet cornell.edu 25

    Once you have connected you ussually have to issue a "helo" command.
    You
    basically are saying hello to the other computer an telling it who you
    are. For
    now lets just claim to be the computer that we are sending mail
    "from". For this
    example lets pretend to be rf34+@andrew.cmu.edu. Lets send this
    message to
    "jmk17@cornell.edu" (he loves getting junk mail):
    < helo andrew.cmu.edu

    Sometimes there is an error entering that command. Enter it again and
    it will
    work. After that we have to move on to starting the message and
    annoucing who it
    is from. We do this with the "mail" command. The syntax is "mail from:
    " where the <>'s are optional on most systems. In
    out example
    we would type:
    < mail from: rf34+@andrew.cmu.edu

    After specifying who the mail it from we must specify who the mail is
    to. We do
    this by using the "rcpt" command. The syntax of this command is "rcpt
    to:
    " where the <>'s are once again optional. This has
    nothing to do
    with who it APPEARS to get the message. The addresses specified with
    this command
    will actually receive the message. In our example we would issue the
    command like
    so:
    < rcpt to: jmk17@cornell.edu

    Next comes the actual message. To specify the content of the message
    you first
    issue the "data" command. You follow the data command with the test of
    the message
    ending with a "." on line by itself. In our example we would do the
    following:
    < data
    > (answerback garbage)

    < You suck. I hate you.
    < .

    Now we're almost done. All we have to do now is quit. We do this by
    typing
    "quit".
    < quit

    (b) What about the headers?

    The above message will be easy to spot as "fake". Instead of saying
    "To:
    jmk17@cornell.edu" it will say "Apparently To: jmk17@cornell.edu".
    Similar will
    happen with from and there will be no subject. To fix these problems
    we must
    manually enter headers for the message. Here I will just talk about
    the most
    important headers - To:, From:, Cc:, and Subject:.

    The "To:" header will be who the recipient sees that the message is
    "To:". If the
    recipient "group replies" he will reply to all people listed after
    "To:" and
    "Cc:" other than himself.

    The "From:" header specifies who the message is from. You should
    always have the
    address that you used in the "mail from:" command somewhere here. It
    looks more
    real if you include the persons real name when issuing this command.
    One way to
    do that is to have the email address and then the real name in
    parenthesis.

    The "Subject:" line is what appears to the recipient as the subject.
    End of
    story.

    You enter the header when entering the message. Lets alter our above
    example so
    that we want it to look like bob@nowhere.net gets a carbon copy. We
    don't want
    him to get a copy - we just want jmk17@cornell.edu to think so. All we
    would do
    is change the second to last step so it looks like this:
    < data
    > (answerback garbage)

    < To: jmk17@cornell.edu
    < From: rf34+@andrew.cmu.edu (Randy Fields)
    < Subject: I hate you!
    < Cc: bob@nowhere.net
    <
    < You suck. I hate you.
    < .

    Note the space between the headers and the message. That is very
    important.

    Now when jmk17@cornell.edu gets our message it will look like a normal
    message
    from his friend Randy. If he had extensive knowledge regarding the way
    mail
    worked he's be able to figure out that it came from your computer and
    not
    andrew.cmu.edu by looking at the extended headers. Since
    jmk17@cornell.edu is
    just your average computer user he can look at the message all day and
    not see a
    problem with it.


    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns
    *Sigh* It's almost as if they interpret the Bible as Microsoft does
    RFCs.
    http://www.lasfs.org http://home.earthlink.net/~sidebrnz

  8. Re: KMail

    Joe Zeff wrote:
    > On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 19:46:13 GMT, Joe Zeff
    > wrote:
    >
    >> That tells you nothing except that it responds. Get the fakemail faq,
    >> read the instructions on how to log onto an SMTP server vial telnet
    >> and send an email message; it's not at all hard, I've done it hundreds
    >> of times.

    >
    > Just in case you've had trouble finding it, here's the whole thing:
    >


    >
    >

    Thanks - I used the script and the email was accepted and sent. No
    problem, no hiccup. Received the email.

    Seems like a rather cumbersome method to send email though.

    Here's what transpired:

    telnet smtp.intergate.com 25
    Trying 216.139.64.8...
    Connected to smtp.intergate.com (216.139.64.8).
    Escape character is '^]'.
    220 corpweb.trip.net ESMTP Sendmail 8.13.5/8.13.5; Thu, 2 Feb 2006
    19:35:53 -0600 (CST)
    helo txxxxl
    250 corpweb.trip.net Hello reston-gnap-ip-216015-93.dynamic.ziplink.net
    [216.8.15.93], pleased to meet you
    mail from: faxxxp-fxxxy@yahoo.com
    250 2.1.0 faxxxp-fxxxy@yahoo.com... Sender ok
    rcpt to: faxxxp-fxxxy1@yahoo.com
    250 2.1.5 faxxxp-fxxxy1@yahoo.com... Recipient ok
    data
    354 Enter mail, end with "." on a line by itself
    esting sending email via intergate using telnet.
    ..
    250 2.0.0 k131ZrGR087557 Message accepted for delivery
    quit
    221 2.0.0 corpweb.trip.net closing connection
    Connection closed by foreign host.

    So - that leaves the impression the problem is in KMail somewhere. I
    succeeded in finding the configuration file for KMail (Thanks to help
    from PogoLinux), renamed and booted KMail. Reset-up smtp server. KMail
    still fails to connect.

    As I wrote to PogoLinux, I would like to find the trouble. I am now
    using Thunderbird (1.5) and liking it more all the time. However, I am
    holding my breath waiting for Thunderbird to exhibit the same malady.
    Maybe whatever caused the problem for KMail will cause trouble for
    Thunderbird in the future.

    Thanks for the help. Much appreciated.

    Terry
    --
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++
    ================================================== ====
    ************************************************** ****
    If you are always rushing towards the future,
    Then you never have any past.

    Terry Boldt
    ************************************************** ****
    Paraphrasing Ben Franklin:

    Those who sacrifice freedom for safety, have neither.

    The exact quote:

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
    temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790),
    US author, diplomat, inventor, physicist, politician, & printer
    Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

    ************************************************** ****

  9. Re: KMail

    On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 20:54:36 -0500, "Terry D. Boldt"
    wrote:

    >
    >Seems like a rather cumbersome method to send email though.


    No more so than telnetting to a POP3 server to read your mail, or an
    NNTP server to read news. Not that I'm suggesting any of those as a
    regular habit, mind you, but it's nice to know how in an emergency, or
    to troubleshoot a problem. Back when I did ISP tech support, it was
    common to telnet to the POP3 server to delete a message that's too big
    to download; we all did it regularly until we got a web-based
    interface to do it. I think I was the only one to learn SMTP, but
    once in a while it came in handy as I wrote before.

    In any event, I'm glad I helped; at least you know there's nothing
    wrong at the server.

    --
    Joe Zeff
    The Guy With the Sideburns
    "Always there are two, the BOFH and the PFY."
    http://www.lasfs.org http://home.earthlink.net/~sidebrnz

  10. Re: KMail

    Joe Zeff wrote:
    > On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 20:54:36 -0500, "Terry D. Boldt"
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Seems like a rather cumbersome method to send email though.

    >
    > No more so than telnetting to a POP3 server to read your mail, or an
    > NNTP server to read news. Not that I'm suggesting any of those as a
    > regular habit, mind you, but it's nice to know how in an emergency, or
    > to troubleshoot a problem. Back when I did ISP tech support, it was
    > common to telnet to the POP3 server to delete a message that's too big
    > to download; we all did it regularly until we got a web-based
    > interface to do it. I think I was the only one to learn SMTP, but
    > once in a while it came in handy as I wrote before.
    >
    > In any event, I'm glad I helped; at least you know there's nothing
    > wrong at the server.
    >


    You're right. Having more than one hammer to fix a job is always a good
    thing. One reason I remain committed to Linux and FOSS. KMail has
    expired for some mysterious reason, but I still have slypheed or
    Evolution or Thunderbird.

    Thanks for the help, I will keep your suggestions in mind for future
    reference and as an added tool.

    Terry

    --
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++
    ================================================== ====
    ************************************************** ****
    If you are always rushing towards the future,
    Then you never have any past.

    Terry Boldt
    ************************************************** ****
    Paraphrasing Ben Franklin:

    Those who sacrifice freedom for safety, have neither.

    The exact quote:

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
    temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790),
    US author, diplomat, inventor, physicist, politician, & printer
    Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

    ************************************************** ****

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