Folder Permissions help - Help

This is a discussion on Folder Permissions help - Help ; hello, I have a very limited understanding of file permissions in linux and i am messing around with php on a linux server. I have created a folder and put files in a folder through php on the server. The ...

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Thread: Folder Permissions help

  1. Folder Permissions help

    hello,
    I have a very limited understanding of file permissions in linux and i am
    messing around with php on a linux server. I have created a folder and put
    files in a folder through php on the server. The owner is 80 and i cannot
    delete the file due to permission denied. I get permission denied for chmod
    and chown.

    How would i go about deleting these files?

    Thanks
    Ricky



  2. Re: Folder Permissions help

    In the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.help, in article
    , Rivera wrote:

    >I have a very limited understanding of file permissions in linux and i am
    >messing around with php on a linux server.


    Well, that's one way to learn. But you'd have a heck of a lot better
    luck if you started reading.

    http://tldp.org/guides.html

    drwxrwxr-x 2 gferg ldp 4096 Feb 19 2004 Pocket-Linux-Guide
    drwxrwxr-x 2 gferg ldp 4096 May 25 08:31 intro-linux
    drwxrwsr-x 4 gferg ldp 4096 Jul 26 14:11 system-admin-guide
    drwxrwsr-x 3 gferg ldp 4096 Feb 14 1999 users-guide

    Each one of those directories holds a book in several print formats.

    >I have created a folder and put files in a folder through php on the server.


    It's called a directory, not a folder. Xerox called them folders in their
    GlobalView system used by secretaries in the 1970s, then Apple copied the
    concept/name. When Bill Gates copied the Mac desktop, he was to lazy to
    rename things.

    >The owner is 80 and i cannot delete the file due to permission denied. I
    >get permission denied for chmod and chown.


    1. Become the user that owns the directory. Delete the files.

    2. Become a member of the group that owns the directory. You can delete
    the files if the group has write permissions to the directory.

    3. Become the owner of the file and delete it.

    Becoming this or that involves using the 'su' command. If you are not the
    owner of the file, only root can change permissions or delete it. If you
    have SELinux extensions running (Fedora for example) even root can't do
    that.

    If the user is identified as a UID 80 rather than a person named '80',
    this probably means a screwup in /etc/passwd. This often happens in a
    chrooted environment. In that case, become root outside, and reach into
    the chrooted environment and correct the chrooted /etc/passwd file.

    >How would i go about deleting these files?


    Depends on information you haven't mentioned.

    Old guy

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