Trying out linux on a dual boot - Help

This is a discussion on Trying out linux on a dual boot - Help ; I'm currently a win98se user, but I'd like to learn more about linux environments and the differences between that and windows. Can I do a full installation of linux on my current windows system and set it up to offer ...

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Thread: Trying out linux on a dual boot

  1. Trying out linux on a dual boot

    I'm currently a win98se user, but I'd like to learn more about linux
    environments and the differences between that and windows.

    Can I do a full installation of linux on my current windows system and set
    it up to offer me a choice of which OS to use on boot without having to
    format?

    What flavor of linux would be considered the overall better choice to use?

    Can I manage this without having to burn a CD? (my current mobo won't see
    my burner... at least not in windows or msdos)

    Can I fit this into around 2GB of space or less?

    I'll probably end up with boatloads of questions, but this will do for a
    start.

  2. Re: Trying out linux on a dual boot

    * Joe Fox wrote in alt.comp.os.linux:
    > I'm currently a win98se user, but I'd like to learn more about linux
    > environments and the differences between that and windows.


    A good start already. Knowing that Windows and Linux are different is
    half the battle.

    > Can I do a full installation of linux on my current windows system and set
    > it up to offer me a choice of which OS to use on boot without having to
    > format?


    Absolutely. By default most of the major distributions (distros) will
    do most of that for you. If you have a free partition it will make life
    easier.

    > What flavor of linux would be considered the overall better choice to use?


    That is a religous questions in *nix groups. I would suggest you have a
    look at one of the many Live distributions Like Knoppix, Mandriva or
    Ubuntu come to mind. These allow you to boot into a running linux
    environment and play around before you decide.

    > Can I manage this without having to burn a CD? (my current mobo won't see
    > my burner... at least not in windows or msdos)


    Its likely that Linux will just recognize it. You can get some boot
    disks to start the install and it will download hat it needs. Again,
    most major distros support this feature. Have a look at
    http://www.distrowatch.com for reviews, news and rankings.

    > Can I fit this into around 2GB of space or less?


    Yes.

    > I'll probably end up with boatloads of questions, but this will do for a
    > start.


    Indeed you will, and you should subscribe to and lurk in some of the
    more popular newsgroups.

    alt.os.linux
    comp.os.linux.misc

    are good, non distro specific groups.

    Good luck and welcome to Linux.
    --
    David
    She has an alarm clock and a phone that don't ring -- they applaud.

  3. Re: Trying out linux on a dual boot

    On Wed, 24 Aug 2005 14:28:44 -0500, Joe Fox
    wrote:

    >I'm currently a win98se user, but I'd like to learn more about linux
    >environments and the differences between that and windows.
    >
    >Can I do a full installation of linux on my current windows system and set
    >it up to offer me a choice of which OS to use on boot without having to
    >format?
    >
    >What flavor of linux would be considered the overall better choice to use?
    >
    >Can I manage this without having to burn a CD? (my current mobo won't see
    >my burner... at least not in windows or msdos)
    >
    >Can I fit this into around 2GB of space or less?
    >
    >I'll probably end up with boatloads of questions, but this will do for a


    If you can't burn a CD, the cheapest way to sample Linux is to
    find a local user who will give you a Knoppix or other "live CD"
    distro. These let you experiment without installing anything to
    your hard disk. If you don't like what you find, just eject the
    CD and reboot. If you don't know a Linux user, the Ubuntu
    project will mail you a CD gratis. Last time I looked, they
    didn't even charge for postage. See www.ubuntu.com for details.
    I have Ubuntu Linux on my laptop, and everything works except
    for the touchpad pointing device (which I don't like) and the
    Broadcom Wi-Fi tranceiver. It's possible to get unsupported
    devices to work in Linux by means of a hack called ndiswrapper,
    which allows a copy of the Windows driver to run in Linux, but I
    haven't got around to it yet.

    2GB is a little tight for a full Linux installation, but most
    Linux distros incude a lot of software that you may never use.
    Most of them let you do a less-than-full install. There are
    some distros, like Puppy and Damn Small Linux, that need only
    about 50MB of disk space. A good place to see what's available
    is www.distrowatch.com


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