How can I recover my lost partitions? - Help

This is a discussion on How can I recover my lost partitions? - Help ; Hi, I had Fedora Core 2 and Win 2000 installed dual mode in two HDs in my PC, they both worked fine. I made a NTFS portion active by mistake yesterday, as a result some of my Linux partitions including ...

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Thread: How can I recover my lost partitions?

  1. How can I recover my lost partitions?

    Hi,

    I had Fedora Core 2 and Win 2000 installed
    dual mode in two HDs in my PC, they both
    worked fine. I made a NTFS portion active by
    mistake yesterday, as a result some of my
    Linux partitions including root and home
    disappeared, they became part of a free,
    unformatted space. How can undo the change to
    recover my lost Linux partitions? I had some
    important data in my Home directory !

    Any help/advice would be highly appreciated.

    Please reply to the group only.

    Thanks.

    Jim




  2. Re: How can I recover my lost partitions?

    "Jim" writes:

    > I had Fedora Core 2 and Win 2000 installed
    > dual mode in two HDs in my PC, they both
    > worked fine. I made a NTFS portion active by
    > mistake yesterday, as a result some of my
    > Linux partitions including root and home
    > disappeared, they became part of a free,
    > unformatted space. How can undo the change to
    > recover my lost Linux partitions? I had some
    > important data in my Home directory !
    >
    > Any help/advice would be highly appreciated.
    >
    > Please reply to the group only.


    Short answer: recreate them using a Linux fdisk (or equivalent). You'll
    have to know exactly where they were and how big they were. If you can't
    boot Linux somehow, use the fdisk on a Linux rescue disk or installation
    CD-ROM. (To use the installation CD-ROM, boot from it and and answer
    enough questions until you get a shell on virtual console 2--it won't have
    touched the disk yet. I prefer to tell it to do a text install.)

    Don't use a Windows FDISK! I don't know if it's still true, but the last
    time I checked, after it created a partition, it wrote zeros to certain
    blocks of that partition to make the file system invalid, to try to force
    the user to do a format.

    To test your partition table, mount the file system read-only manually
    in the rescue environment. You can then use fsck in a non-destructive
    mode. If the file system passes, then you've correctly located the
    beginning of the partition.

    Needless to say, read all the man pages for the programs you use, making
    sure they don't write to the disk until you're ready for them to. Writing
    to a file system that is improperly identified by the partition table is
    sure to cause corruption. Writing the partition table itself isn't so
    dangerous, as long as you leave your Windows partitions alone.

    Scott
    --
    Scott Hemphill hemphill@alumni.caltech.edu
    "This isn't flying. This is falling, with style." -- Buzz Lightyear

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