Format Hard Drive for Linux ONLY OS Install - Help

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Thread: Format Hard Drive for Linux ONLY OS Install

  1. Format Hard Drive for Linux ONLY OS Install

    How do I partition and format for a Linux only OS(no dual boot) Install?
    Thanx,
    Rick




  2. Re: Format Hard Drive for Linux ONLY OS Install

    On Sun, 01 Aug 2004 17:57:54 -0400, Windwood wrote:

    > How do I partition and format for a Linux only OS(no dual boot) Install?
    > Thanx,
    > Rick


    You can use fdisk.

    See the Partition HOWTO for detailed information.

    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Partition/index.html

    --
    Thomas D. Shepard
    Sorry, you can't email me.
    (Email address is fake.)


  3. Re: Format Hard Drive for Linux ONLY OS Install

    On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 17:57:54 -0400, Windwood wrote:
    > How do I partition and format for a Linux only OS(no dual boot) Install?
    > Thanx,
    > Rick


    Pretty much any distro will do that for you. Pop in the disc and follow
    the instructions.
    --
    Registered Linux user #266531

  4. Re: Format Hard Drive for Linux ONLY OS Install

    Windwood wrote:

    > How do I partition and format for a Linux only OS(no dual boot) Install?
    > Thanx,
    > Rick


    You can download something like knoppix liveCD
    boot up on the liveCD and using Qtparted, do all the
    work in a neat comfort of a graphical environment.

    But also as others have said, installers all come
    with software to set up and format partitions.

  5. Re: Format Hard Drive for Linux ONLY OS Install

    Windwood wrote:

    > How do I partition and format for a Linux only OS(no dual boot)
    > Install? Thanx,
    > Rick



    The answer would depend on how your distribution behaves with respect to
    default partitioning, A modern distribution should take an empty disk
    (one from which all partitions have been removed) and partition it
    according to the partitioning philosophy of the people who wrote the
    distribution's installer.

    If you are building from scratch, and therefore have to do your own
    partitioning, a good starting philosophy would be to make a root
    partition (mounted as /) that is large enough to hold your root system
    plus ample room for additions plus a swap partition that is twice the
    size of your installed memory (to a max swap of 1 gig) plus the
    remainder of the disk as a single partition mounted as /home. The
    biggest partition is /home because that is the one that will grow the
    most as you add users and their preferences, bookmarks, profiles and
    work product.

    Partitioning philosophy can get arcane and can be ripe ground for
    disputation. You actually can put the whole tree into a single
    partition and that would probably be the default in a minimal system on
    a very small drive (such as the 2 gig drive on which I installed my
    first linux system) Having /home in a separate partition allows you to
    remove a system and re-install without disturbing the /home tree and
    therefor without losing your profiles, preferences, bookmarks and work
    product.

    If you are using Mandrake, simply remove all partitions then insert your
    install disk 1 and accept the default partitioning. Then when you get
    to the package selection screen, choose all the workstation options,
    chose at least one desktop (KDE or Gnome or both, Mandrake preselects
    KDE by default) and choose no server option. That will give you a good
    and reasonably complete system with a wealth of applications and, with
    KDE, an easy migration from windows without too steep a learning curve.

    Clive



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