New Motherboard: some newbie advice - Hardware

This is a discussion on New Motherboard: some newbie advice - Hardware ; I am almost to the point of buying the parts for a minitower build, and just wanted to ease my mind about drivers. 1. Does Linux have all the drivers for the interfaces like IDE, SATA, PCI, etc? Cuz, most ...

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Thread: New Motherboard: some newbie advice

  1. New Motherboard: some newbie advice

    I am almost to the point of buying the parts for a minitower build, and just
    wanted to ease my mind about drivers. 1. Does Linux have all the drivers
    for the interfaces like IDE, SATA, PCI, etc? Cuz, most of the mobos only
    come with Windohs drivers.


    *R* *H*

    --
    "I'll take the nice ones with simple installers etc, because to me, thats the
    whole and only point of using a distribution in the first place."
    Linus Torvalds (2007)

  2. Re: New Motherboard: some newbie advice

    On Jul 24, 9:21 am, Rockinghorse Winner
    wrote:
    > I am almost to the point of buying the parts for a minitower build, and just
    > wanted to ease my mind about drivers. 1. Does Linux have all the drivers
    > for the interfaces like IDE, SATA, PCI, etc? Cuz, most of the mobos only
    > come with Windohs drivers.
    >
    > *R* *H*
    >
    > --
    > "I'll take the nice ones with simple installers etc, because to me, thats the
    > whole and only point of using a distribution in the first place."
    > Linus Torvalds (2007)


    You must be specific about what hardware you are talking about. You
    are using very very general terms.
    Linux nowadays support "almost" everything windows supports out of the
    box, but there are different issues about different hardware,
    therefore you must be specific



  3. Re: New Motherboard: some newbie advice

    Rockinghorse Winner wrote:
    > I am almost to the point of buying the parts for a minitower build, and just
    > wanted to ease my mind about drivers. 1. Does Linux have all the drivers
    > for the interfaces like IDE, SATA, PCI, etc? Cuz, most of the mobos only
    > come with Windohs drivers.
    >
    >
    > *R* *H*
    >

    Best Option:
    Grab a live CDrom of Mepis (Ubuntu +1% goodness) and start sticking it
    into computers you encounter in stores. If they balk, you walk.
    I do it hundreds of times each year, in dozens of large stores.
    Handing out the LiveCDroms after the demo. Got five minutes? Watch
    Mepis boot a top of the line system in the computer section at a major
    chain store. Crowds gather.

    Have yet to find a system that won't boot and run. I love the positive
    comments from folks who already are disgusted with those commercial
    bundled systems that only slow their work, or worse, won't provide any
    support! Mepis, like most Linux distros, provides online forums; plus,
    support from users, by email; and a database of resolved questions.

    Recently went on the web (pricewatch.com and bought from newegg, 3btech,
    computergate) and bought several system boards, some with cpu included.

    I purchase by price, not by technology. That's how much I trust Linux
    to have the gonads to run stuff, as all hardware really must comply to
    ISO. Most systems were built, including all updates, in less than 20
    minutes. There is no trial ware nor nag screens. Immune to all
    "Microsoft virus, malware, trojans, and exploits".

    I toss out all winmodems, winprinters. Thrift stores, and charity
    shoppes, garage sales, in my local community all have multifunction
    Laser printers at less than the cost of a crappy Lexmark printer.

    There are too many genuine parts for cheap prices. Yes, many of the
    brain dead objects can be run using Linux, but, there is so much
    available good, proper, stuff, that I don't care to fuss with cheesy crap.

    So, I have running systems with MSI, Chaintech, PcChips, ECS, ASUS, FIC,
    Intel, and other makers boards here, without any problems. All Dell,
    HP, Compaq, and white box systems simply boot and run with the Live
    CDRoms of GNU/Linux.

    I also pick up donated & curbside recovered computers of Pentium Class,
    and they all run, though I recommend at least a 350 Mhz processor for
    quick response. Slower units become Ipcop boxes, and/or Thin Client
    terminals. I place the surplus systems into homes of single parents
    with kids, plus local private schools and charities.

    This unit is my first incursion into modern 64 bit systems, running
    Mepis Version 6.5, 64 bit version. Sweet! It is an MSI K8NGM2-FID with
    Sempron 3000+, a 64 bit, 939 pin socket, running with 768Mb of DDR 400
    RAM. Double sweet!

    I also have a 1993 DEC Alpha, running Linux. Also Sweet.

    Bottom line, grab a LiveCDrom from http://livecdlist.com and examine
    systems with it. Look up the system specs, and you will find that the
    component parts for that Compaq, HP, Dell, etc. system, are on the web
    much cheaper, and that they all run Linux.

  4. Re: New Motherboard: some newbie advice

    In comp.os.linux.hardware, Oldtech had the audacity to say that:

    > Rockinghorse Winner wrote:
    >> I am almost to the point of buying the parts for a minitower build, and just
    >> wanted to ease my mind about drivers. 1. Does Linux have all the drivers
    >> for the interfaces like IDE, SATA, PCI, etc? Cuz, most of the mobos only
    >> come with Windohs drivers.
    >>
    >>
    >> *R* *H*
    >>

    > Best Option:
    > Grab a live CDrom of Mepis (Ubuntu +1% goodness) and start sticking it
    > into computers you encounter in stores. If they balk, you walk.
    > I do it hundreds of times each year, in dozens of large stores.
    > Handing out the LiveCDroms after the demo. Got five minutes? Watch
    > Mepis boot a top of the line system in the computer section at a major
    > chain store. Crowds gather.
    >
    > Have yet to find a system that won't boot and run. I love the positive
    > comments from folks who already are disgusted with those commercial
    > bundled systems that only slow their work, or worse, won't provide any
    > support! Mepis, like most Linux distros, provides online forums; plus,
    > support from users, by email; and a database of resolved questions.
    >
    > Recently went on the web (pricewatch.com and bought from newegg, 3btech,
    > computergate) and bought several system boards, some with cpu included.
    >
    > I purchase by price, not by technology. That's how much I trust Linux
    > to have the gonads to run stuff, as all hardware really must comply to
    > ISO. Most systems were built, including all updates, in less than 20
    > minutes. There is no trial ware nor nag screens. Immune to all
    > "Microsoft virus, malware, trojans, and exploits".
    >
    > I toss out all winmodems, winprinters. Thrift stores, and charity
    > shoppes, garage sales, in my local community all have multifunction
    > Laser printers at less than the cost of a crappy Lexmark printer.
    >
    > There are too many genuine parts for cheap prices. Yes, many of the
    > brain dead objects can be run using Linux, but, there is so much
    > available good, proper, stuff, that I don't care to fuss with cheesy crap.
    >
    > So, I have running systems with MSI, Chaintech, PcChips, ECS, ASUS, FIC,
    > Intel, and other makers boards here, without any problems. All Dell,
    > HP, Compaq, and white box systems simply boot and run with the Live
    > CDRoms of GNU/Linux.
    >
    > I also pick up donated & curbside recovered computers of Pentium Class,
    > and they all run, though I recommend at least a 350 Mhz processor for
    > quick response. Slower units become Ipcop boxes, and/or Thin Client
    > terminals. I place the surplus systems into homes of single parents
    > with kids, plus local private schools and charities.
    >
    > This unit is my first incursion into modern 64 bit systems, running
    > Mepis Version 6.5, 64 bit version. Sweet! It is an MSI K8NGM2-FID with
    > Sempron 3000+, a 64 bit, 939 pin socket, running with 768Mb of DDR 400
    > RAM. Double sweet!
    >
    > I also have a 1993 DEC Alpha, running Linux. Also Sweet.
    >
    > Bottom line, grab a LiveCDrom from http://livecdlist.com and examine
    > systems with it. Look up the system specs, and you will find that the
    > component parts for that Compaq, HP, Dell, etc. system, are on the web
    > much cheaper, and that they all run Linux.


    Yea, ok, you convinced me. I'm pretty much settled on a nvidia/nforce mb
    and a X2 3800+ cpu. Heard the lower X2's don't run too hot w/ stock cooler.
    The only other thing (other than SATA compatibility) is whether the PSU that
    comes with the case is up to the job (450 watts, but cheap!).

    *R* *H*

    --
    "I'll take the nice ones with simple installers etc, because to me, thats the
    whole and only point of using a distribution in the first place."
    Linus Torvalds (2007)

  5. Re: New Motherboard: some newbie advice

    On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 04:21:02 +0000, Rockinghorse Winner wrote:

    > I am almost to the point of buying the parts for a minitower build, and just
    > wanted to ease my mind about drivers. 1. Does Linux have all the drivers
    > for the interfaces like IDE, SATA, PCI, etc? Cuz, most of the mobos only
    > come with Windohs drivers.
    >
    >
    > *R* *H*


    I don't think the 6100-chipsets are well supported. The ASUS-m2n series
    mobos are prime offenders.

    nss
    ********


  6. Re: New Motherboard: some newbie advice

    on Friday 03 August 2007 22:47
    in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.hardware
    noshellswill wrote:

    > On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 04:21:02 +0000, Rockinghorse Winner wrote:
    >
    >> I am almost to the point of buying the parts for a minitower build, and
    >> just
    >> wanted to ease my mind about drivers. 1. Does Linux have all the drivers
    >> for the interfaces like IDE, SATA, PCI, etc? Cuz, most of the mobos only
    >> come with Windohs drivers.
    >>
    >>
    >> *R* *H*

    >
    > I don't think the 6100-chipsets are well supported. The ASUS-m2n series
    > mobos are prime offenders.


    Did you mean the 500 series chipsets?

    I have an ASUS M2N-E with an n-force 570 ultra that is not quite
    reliable.


    --
    sig goes here...
    Peter D.

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