building on your own a large data storage ... - Hardware

This is a discussion on building on your own a large data storage ... - Hardware ; > > Many school physics books and some of those "for engineers" are very > > simple and basic even about relatively over-simplistic (and > > simplified) Mechanics ~ > Ah, so my University Physics books are Physics for Dummys. ...

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Thread: building on your own a large data storage ...

  1. Re: building on your own a large data storage ...

    > > Many school physics books and some of those "for engineers" are very
    > > simple and basic even about relatively over-simplistic (and
    > > simplified) Mechanics

    ~
    > Ah, so my University Physics books are Physics for Dummys. I see. Did I mention Mechanics, by Symon, is a grad school book?

    ~
    I don't know about this particular book, but you could see what I
    meant. Even the wikipedia entry for the explanation of what "torque"
    is was so basic that it read like an odd joke to me
    ~
    > > I think what your books missed was that the angular momentum of a
    > > solid body you calculate over an integration and in this integration
    > > are considered

    ~
    > When you are dealing with a non-rigid body, you have a point. The
    > platter(s) of a hard drive are quite rigid, therefore you do not have a
    > point when dealing with hard drives.

    ~
    Actually no. There is a form factor that factors (no pun intended)
    into the integral to calculate the angular momentum
    ~
    > > * gravity
    > > * lever
    > > * objects volumetric form as "perceived" by the rotating axis

    ~
    > Please, do explain. I'm still waiting for your explainantion of how
    > gravity can affect energy requirements for spinning a small aluminum
    > disk, inre disk parallel to gravity vector vs. disk perpendicular to
    > gravity vector.

    ~
    I still owe you those ones
    ~
    > > Got a Kill-O-Watt and a couple volt meters. Maybe I'll try that.

    ~
    > I would bet half of my right gut ;-) that you need to do more work,

    ~
    > The phrase is "bet my right nut", as in gonad. I would suggest betting
    > something less important, like maybe a box of Krispy Kremes.

    ~
    ;-)
    ~
    > > therefore there will ultimately be more power consumption, but both
    > > spindle the hard drive's platter and its reading magnetic arm while
    > > having the drive horizontally placed. How much more I don't know

    ~
    > Probably non-existant, but most certainly smaller than a Kill-o-Watt
    > (digital), cheap digital multi-meter (digital), or the Voltmeter on my
    > engine analyzer (analogue) can resolve.

    ~
    Hmm! You see now we are talking! That is interesting to me! How did
    you make the drive spin? Issuing internal assembler code to just make
    it spin without any rw work and keeping its arm parked?
    ~
    lbrtchx


  2. Re: building on your own a large data storage ...

    > cosmic rays ...
    ~
    in his excellent book about soft not hardware:
    ~
    Why Programs Fail: A Guide to Systematic Debugging; ISBN-10:
    1558608664
    ~
    Andreas Zeller states cosmic rays don't affect computers ...
    ~
    I had read otherwise @@
    ~
    lbrtchx


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