Linux questions - Hardware

This is a discussion on Linux questions - Hardware ; Hi, We are trying make decisions around Linux. We have the following questions: - Which distro is best for software development Redhat or SUSE ( We only have these alternatives)? - Shall we use the desktop or server version. What ...

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  1. Linux questions

    Hi,

    We are trying make decisions around Linux. We have the following questions:

    - Which distro is best for software development Redhat or SUSE ( We only
    have these alternatives)?

    - Shall we use the desktop or server version. What is the main difference?

    - What is the main reason to use the 64-bit version over the 32-bit?

    - In solaris there is something called jumpstart ( when upgrading och
    reinstalling the os). Is there something similair for Linux?


    All advice is greatly appreciated.

    cheers,

    //mikael

  2. Re: Linux questions

    Petterson Mikael wrote:

    You probably asked this to the wrong group,but here goes:

    > Hi,
    >
    > We are trying make decisions around Linux. We have the following
    > questions:
    >
    > - Which distro is best for software development Redhat or SUSE ( We only
    > have these alternatives)?


    Ubuntu.

    Given your restrictions, then Redhat/Fedora. I don't know what SuSE is like
    these days, but I thought it was a horrible system back in v7.2

    > - Shall we use the desktop or server version. What is the main difference?


    Pretty much what packages you get installed. Wroksation=fat install,
    server=thin (generally anyway). You probably want "workstation" for
    development. The kernel or kernel settings might be tweaked differently,
    server=load, workstation=good interactive response - again you want
    workstation.

    > - What is the main reason to use the 64-bit version over the 32-bit?


    One has a 32 bit arch and the other 64 bits. The 32 bit ix86 distros will
    run on ix86 and amd64 (including Core 2 Duo etc). The 64 bit amd64 distro
    will run on AMD 64 bit CPUs (Athlon 64, Opteron etc) and Core 2 Duo (plus
    other radom EMT64 enable intel CPUs). You need to defined whether this
    affects what you are targetting with your development - you need at least
    one build/test system for each arch you target a product towards.

    64 bit will give you > 2GB memory address space, better performance for data
    hungry applications in some classes (eg MySQL with loads of data). It may
    gain nothing or be slightly less efficient in some other cases.

    You really have to try this yourselves.

    > - In solaris there is something called jumpstart ( when upgrading och
    > reinstalling the os). Is there something similair for Linux?


    Redhat has "kickstart" which is comparable.

    SuSE used to have some hideous thing called "Alice" - don't know what it has
    now, but it will certainly have something.

    The principles are the same as jumpstart - config files + distribution cache
    on a server, DHCP tweakage and a custom boot floppy/CD/USB-thing or PXE
    boot off a TFTP server (depending on distro, hardware etc).

    You can get a pretty custom and repeatable install with kickstart.

    Cheers

    Tim



  3. Re: Linux questions

    Tim Southerwood wrote:
    > Petterson Mikael wrote:
    >
    > You probably asked this to the wrong group,but here goes:
    >
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>We are trying make decisions around Linux. We have the following
    >>questions:
    >>
    >>- Which distro is best for software development Redhat or SUSE ( We only
    >>have these alternatives)?

    >
    >
    > Ubuntu.
    >
    > Given your restrictions, then Redhat/Fedora. I don't know what SuSE is like
    > these days, but I thought it was a horrible system back in v7.2
    >
    >
    >>- Shall we use the desktop or server version. What is the main difference?

    >
    >
    > Pretty much what packages you get installed. Wroksation=fat install,
    > server=thin (generally anyway). You probably want "workstation" for
    > development. The kernel or kernel settings might be tweaked differently,
    > server=load, workstation=good interactive response - again you want
    > workstation.
    >
    >
    >>- What is the main reason to use the 64-bit version over the 32-bit?

    >
    >
    > One has a 32 bit arch and the other 64 bits. The 32 bit ix86 distros will
    > run on ix86 and amd64 (including Core 2 Duo etc). The 64 bit amd64 distro
    > will run on AMD 64 bit CPUs (Athlon 64, Opteron etc) and Core 2 Duo (plus
    > other radom EMT64 enable intel CPUs). You need to defined whether this
    > affects what you are targetting with your development - you need at least
    > one build/test system for each arch you target a product towards.
    >
    > 64 bit will give you > 2GB memory address space, better performance for data
    > hungry applications in some classes (eg MySQL with loads of data). It may
    > gain nothing or be slightly less efficient in some other cases.
    >
    > You really have to try this yourselves.
    >
    >
    >>- In solaris there is something called jumpstart ( when upgrading och
    >>reinstalling the os). Is there something similair for Linux?

    >
    >
    > Redhat has "kickstart" which is comparable.
    >
    > SuSE used to have some hideous thing called "Alice" - don't know what it has
    > now, but it will certainly have something.
    >
    > The principles are the same as jumpstart - config files + distribution cache
    > on a server, DHCP tweakage and a custom boot floppy/CD/USB-thing or PXE
    > boot off a TFTP server (depending on distro, hardware etc).
    >
    > You can get a pretty custom and repeatable install with kickstart.
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Tim
    >
    >

    Thanks for your answer. The only thing I need an answer to is if you can
    jumpstart SUSE. If anyone can tell me I appreciate it. By the way is it
    hw or sw depening function ( jumstart)?

    cheers,

    //mikael

  4. Re: Linux questions

    Petterson Mikael wrote:
    > Thanks for your answer. The only thing I need an answer to is if you
    > can jumpstart SUSE. If anyone can tell me I appreciate it. By the way
    > is it hw or sw depening function ( jumstart)?


    SUSE has AutoYaST for automated installs. See:
    http://www.suse.de/~ug/autoyast_doc/index.html
    Automated install is a software function, if you want
    completely "hands-free" operation you need network booting support in
    the hardware/BIOS.

    --
    Markku Kolkka
    markku.kolkka@iki.fi



  5. Re: Linux questions

    On Wed, 25 Apr 2007 13:12:03 +0200, Petterson Mikael wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > We are trying make decisions around Linux. We have the following questions:
    >
    > - Which distro is best for software development Redhat or SUSE ( We only
    > have these alternatives)?


    From my experience doing scientific software and support, I'd say there is
    not much difference. Every major distro has all the tools you'd need
    available. Some of them may not come pre-installed, but that's not a big
    deal in the long run.

    >
    > - Shall we use the desktop or server version. What is the main difference?


    Yes. For software development, IMHO - you'd be better off with a desktop -
    select 'workstation' profile or similar if it's available.

    >
    > - What is the main reason to use the 64-bit version over the 32-bit?


    Cause it's there? I really can't see any major advantage for most folks.

    >
    > - In solaris there is something called jumpstart ( when upgrading och
    > reinstalling the os). Is there something similair for Linux?


    I'm glad to know there is something called jupstart. Now, what does it do
    - and what of that functionality do you want/need?

    >
    >
    > All advice is greatly appreciated.
    >
    > cheers,
    >
    > //mikael



  6. Re: Linux questions

    "Petterson Mikael" wrote in
    message news:f0nd24$87l$1@news.al.sw.ericsson.se...
    > Hi,
    >
    > We are trying make decisions around Linux. We have the following

    questions:
    >
    > - Which distro is best for software development Redhat or SUSE ( We only
    > have these alternatives)?


    I would chose RedHat mostly for the political issues.

    > - Shall we use the desktop or server version. What is the main difference?


    Chose desktop. Server version is just older verified versions of the same
    software. If you are getting into the commercial world, verify your
    software
    against the server version also.

    > - What is the main reason to use the 64-bit version over the 32-bit?


    At the moment, big memory. If you software needs big/lots of RAM
    go for amd64 versions of FC6/7. Otherwise, doesn't matter.
    Driver availability/quality is still iffy for 64bit linux but getting
    better.

    > - In solaris there is something called jumpstart ( when upgrading och
    > reinstalling the os). Is there something similair for Linux?


    There are all kinds of tricks for installing Linux (images, net/lan based,
    cd, scripts etc...)

    later.....

    > All advice is greatly appreciated.
    >
    > cheers,
    >
    > //mikael




  7. Re: Linux questions

    "***** charles" writes:
    >Driver availability/quality is still iffy for 64bit linux but getting
    >better.


    Here's my experience:

    On x86-64, we have run 64-bit Linux for three years, with currently
    eight different models of machines, and have had no problems with
    drivers. Even my old NE2000-compatible PCI card works without
    problems, and that has not been supported in any Windows version I
    have tried.

    Moreover, we have used 64-bit Linux on Alphas (four different models)
    for ten years, and never had a problem with drivers, either, despite
    the funny way that early Alphas did 8-bit and 16-bit memory-mapped
    I/O.

    For proprietary drivers, yes, they usually only support the i386
    architecture, but if a piece of hardware has no free drivers, I would
    not recommend it for Linux anyway.

    - anton
    --
    M. Anton Ertl Some things have to be seen to be believed
    anton@mips.complang.tuwien.ac.at Most things have to be believed to be seen
    http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/anton/home.html

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