Hardware for Linux server - Hardware

This is a discussion on Hardware for Linux server - Hardware ; Hello Group, I've decided to setup a machine as server (Linux base). I will appreciate if sombody could give me some advice. What type of hardware do I need to buy? in terms of mainboard brand and other necessary requriements ...

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Thread: Hardware for Linux server

  1. Hardware for Linux server


    Hello Group,

    I've decided to setup a machine as server (Linux base). I will
    appreciate if sombody could give me some advice.

    What type of hardware do I need to buy? in terms of mainboard brand and
    other necessary requriements that it must meet. Currently, I'm kind of
    confused since some say AMD and some say Intel. I personally think
    linux works fine on both but for long run I need to choose something
    acceptable.

    Should I go with dual-core or just the single core mainboard?


    I switched to linux two year ago and what I have so far has been
    software development only. Now, it is time to learn admin tasks as well
    so thinking to setup such a server at home (inluding: webserver, email
    server).

    Thanks,
    amit


  2. Re: Hardware for Linux server

    On Mon, 08 Jan 2007 17:54:14 -0800, Amit wrote:

    > Hello Group,
    >
    > I've decided to setup a machine as server (Linux base). I will
    > appreciate if sombody could give me some advice.
    >
    > What type of hardware do I need to buy? in terms of mainboard brand and
    > other necessary requriements that it must meet. Currently, I'm kind of
    > confused since some say AMD and some say Intel. I personally think
    > linux works fine on both but for long run I need to choose something
    > acceptable.
    >
    > Should I go with dual-core or just the single core mainboard?
    >
    >
    > I switched to linux two year ago and what I have so far has been
    > software development only. Now, it is time to learn admin tasks as well
    > so thinking to setup such a server at home (inluding: webserver, email
    > server).
    >
    > Thanks,
    > amit


    You'll have to be more specific about the performance requirements of your
    server.

    All of the Intel Core2 Duos are dual core, AMD Athlon 64s are available in
    both single and dual core versions. The single and dual core A64s are pin
    compatible so your choice of motherboard doesn't limit you to one or the
    other. The Core2 and A64s motherboards can support up to 8G of memory. The
    number of SATA ports is also about the same, my Core2 motherboard has 9
    SATA ports for example. Intel is offering a quad core part which is two
    Core2 Duos in the same package. It's pin compatible with the regular
    Core2s so you can build a 4 core system with an ordinary desktop
    motherboard. If you need a bigger system then the AMD Opteron and Intel
    Xeon systems are what you would want. The Opteron and Xeon systems have
    two or more CPU sockets and larger memory capacities.

    The Core2 is 25-30% faster on a clock for clock basis then the Athlon 64s.
    Athlon 64 motherboards have fewer compatibility issues then Core2
    motherboards. The NVidia Nforce motherboards for A64 are pretty much
    problem free. The Intel 965 motherboards for the Core2 have a number of
    issues that can be worked around. One problem is that the 965 doesn't
    support PATA so all of the motherboards add a JMicron PATA chip. The
    driver for the JMicron chip isn't in the installers for even the most upto
    date distros like FC6. There is a simple workaround for this, don't use
    any PATA devices. I used a Lite On SATA DVD ROM in my box, it's cheap
    ($29) and it worked fine with the FC6 installer. The next issue is the
    Ethernet chips that are used on the Core2 motherboards. The most popular
    chip is a Realtek chip that isn't supported in the 2.6.18 kernel which is
    what FC6 uses. It is supported in the 2.6.19 kernel. After I did my FC6
    install I put the 2.6.19.1 kernel onto my box using a PCI Ethernet card (a
    USB FLASH key will also work). With the 2.6.19.1 kernel the Ethernet works
    fine. The next two problems that I'm having may be specific to the Abit AB9
    Pro. One is that LM Sensors doesn't work so you have no way of monitoring
    the CPU temperature. The next problem is more serious, I pretty sure that
    the On Demand CPU frequency scaling governor has a bug on the Abit AB9 Pro
    and possibly on other Core2 motherboards. I've had my my system for
    several weeks now. When I first got it I experienced several crashes. I
    tried a number of things, including underclocking the memory and reducing
    the CPU speed. That didn't help. However when I switched from the On
    Demand governor to the Performance Governor (which keeps the CPU at the
    the maximum clock rate) my crashes went away. In fact after a week I
    bumped the clock rate up from 2.66GHz (the speced speed for an E6700) to
    3GHz. It's be running for a week at that speed under heavy load and it's
    been stable which increases my confidence that the stability problems are
    due entirely to the On Demand governor.

  3. Re: Hardware for Linux server



    On Mon, 8 Jan 2007, Amit wrote:

    >
    > Hello Group,
    >
    > I've decided to setup a machine as server (Linux base). I will
    > appreciate if sombody could give me some advice.
    >
    > What type of hardware do I need to buy? in terms of mainboard brand and
    > other necessary requriements that it must meet. Currently, I'm kind of
    > confused since some say AMD and some say Intel. I personally think
    > linux works fine on both but for long run I need to choose something
    > acceptable.


    You need to clarify your requirements. Do you mean a small home file
    server? Or something else?

    AMD/Intel: What really matters is the chipset. Make sure that the chipset
    is well supported. Slightly older hardware tends to be better supported.

    >
    > Should I go with dual-core or just the single core mainboard?


    If you need your server to do a lot of computing, then dual-core is the
    way to go. However, file serving does not stress the CPU to any degree.

    My home server runs on a 800MHz Via processor and this is plenty fast
    enough for my requirements. However, if you wanted to do something like
    video processing, then a much faster processor would be required.


  4. Re: Hardware for Linux server


    Amit wrote:
    > Hello Group,
    >
    > I've decided to setup a machine as server (Linux base). I will
    > appreciate if sombody could give me some advice.
    >
    > What type of hardware do I need to buy? in terms of mainboard brand and
    > other necessary requriements that it must meet. Currently, I'm kind of
    > confused since some say AMD and some say Intel. I personally think
    > linux works fine on both but for long run I need to choose something
    > acceptable.
    >
    > Should I go with dual-core or just the single core mainboard?
    >

    Depends on what you want to do. With intel if you get a dual cpu
    socket mobo (Xeon only???) and drop two quads you
    can have an 8 core system. Must be a selling point for people
    who use entry level Sun servers.

    Does Sun hardware do more in flight system consistency checks
    than ECC by Intel on 975X?

    In any event get a board with heatpipes from northbridge going
    somewhere.
    The northbridge on G965 is getting VERY hot. Maybe try 975X ?


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