the options correspond which file system? - Hardware

This is a discussion on the options correspond which file system? - Hardware ; the options correspond which file system? i only know msdos_partition correspond FAT. static int (*check_part[])(struct gendisk *hd, struct block_device *bdev, unsigned long first_sect, int first_minor) = { #ifdef CONFIG_ACORN_PARTITION acorn_partition, #endif #ifdef CONFIG_EFI_PARTITION efi_partition, /* this must come before msdos ...

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Thread: the options correspond which file system?

  1. the options correspond which file system?

    the options correspond which file system? i only know msdos_partition
    correspond FAT.

    static int (*check_part[])(struct gendisk *hd, struct block_device *bdev,
    unsigned long first_sect, int first_minor) = {
    #ifdef CONFIG_ACORN_PARTITION
    acorn_partition,
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_EFI_PARTITION
    efi_partition, /* this must come before msdos */
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_LDM_PARTITION
    ldm_partition, /* this must come before msdos */
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_MSDOS_PARTITION
    msdos_partition,
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_OSF_PARTITION
    osf_partition,
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_SUN_PARTITION
    sun_partition,
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_AMIGA_PARTITION
    amiga_partition,
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_ATARI_PARTITION
    atari_partition,
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_MAC_PARTITION
    mac_partition,
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_SGI_PARTITION
    sgi_partition,
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_ULTRIX_PARTITION
    ultrix_partition,
    #endif
    #ifdef CONFIG_IBM_PARTITION
    ibm_partition,
    #endif
    NULL
    };




  2. Re: the options correspond which file system?

    freegnu wrote:
    > the options correspond which file system? i only know msdos_partition
    > correspond FAT.


    Nope. The MSDOS partition table structure is common on PC hardware,
    whether you're using FAT filesystems or ext2, ReiserFS, or whatever.

    The other partition types come from other operating systems, typically
    running on other hardware platforms. The SGI partition type, for
    example, is most commonly found in machines with MIPS processors running
    IRIX. You can put those disks into a Linux box and read them just fine
    if you enable the SGI partition type support. Likewise the Sun
    partition type is for interoperability with disks used under Solaris (on
    either Sparc or x86 processors).

    There's some documentation to be found in the kernel sources in the file
    /usr/src/linux/fs/partitions/Kconfig (assuming the kernel sources are in
    /usr/src/linux). If you still have further questions after reading that
    file, feel free to ask follow-up questions here.

  3. Re: the options correspond which file system?

    On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 15:44:51 +0800, freegnu staggered into the Black Sun
    and said:
    > [These] options correspond [to] which file system? [I] only know
    > [that] msdos_partition [corresponds to] FAT.
    >
    > static int (*check_part[])(struct gendisk *hd, struct block_device *bdev,
    > unsigned long first_sect, int first_minor) = {
    > #ifdef CONFIG_ACORN_PARTITION

    [snip code that looks like it's kernel code]

    These are partition table layouts IIRC, *not* filesystem layouts. Get
    your terminology right; that makes it much easier for people to
    understand you. An MS-DOS partition layout is the partition layout used
    on the x86 and x86-64, 446 bytes of real-mode code, 64 bytes of
    partition table, 2 bytes of signature. The partitions described in the
    table there *do not* have to be FAT; they usually aren't.

    The BSD partition table is different; on an x86 running *BSD, you
    usually set one primary partition up as a BSD partition and you have
    "slices" within that partition. Acorn, Sun, Atari, and MacOS partition
    layouts all have their own strange quirks--usually to deal with
    artifacts introduced in a particular arch's boot firmware.

    In the real world, you usually choose to say Y to your arch's preferred
    partition layout and the MS-DOS/x86 partition layout (which is
    ubiquitous on keychain drives and external hard disks.) If you're
    dealing with weird or special circumstances, say Y to the other
    partition layouts you're likely to come across. HTH,

    --
    If you're looking for trouble, I can offer you a wide selection.
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see

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