Corrupted Partition Table? - Hardware

This is a discussion on Corrupted Partition Table? - Hardware ; I tried to install Kubuntu 6.06 on my system, but the installer was unable to read the partition table for my hard drive. I did fdisk to find out that my 55GB partition (hdb7) turned into a 31Kb partition. Here ...

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Thread: Corrupted Partition Table?

  1. Corrupted Partition Table?

    I tried to install Kubuntu 6.06 on my system, but the installer was
    unable to read the partition table for my hard drive. I did fdisk to
    find out that my 55GB partition (hdb7) turned into a 31Kb partition.
    Here is the output of fdisk:
    Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/hdb1 * 1 1095 8795556 83 Linux
    /dev/hdb2 1096 1146 409657+ 82 Linux swap /
    Solaris
    /dev/hdb3 1147 2648 12064815 5 Extended
    /dev/hdb5 1648 2648 8040501 83 Linux
    /dev/hdb6 1147 1647 4024219+ 83 Linux
    /dev/hdb7 1648 1648 31 83 Linux

    Partition table entries are not in disk order


    I also did the following:

    $ dmesg | tail
    [ 9199.252441] EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
    [ 9598.353573] EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
    [ 9598.452241] kjournald starting. Commit interval 5 seconds
    [ 9601.294008] kjournald starting. Commit interval 5 seconds
    [ 9601.294984] EXT3 FS on hdb1, internal journal
    [ 9601.295205] EXT3-fs: recovery complete.
    [ 9601.295397] EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
    [ 9904.223672] SQUASHFS error: Can't find a SQUASHFS superblock on hdb7
    [ 9932.247583] VFS: Can't find ext3 filesystem on dev hdb7.
    [ 9946.863511] VFS: Can't find an ext2 filesystem on dev hdb7.

    I hope someone would suggest me a way to recover my data on this
    partition.

    TIA

    --Nadir


  2. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?

    nadircruise@gmail.com wrote:

    > I tried to install Kubuntu 6.06 on my system, but the installer was
    > unable to read the partition table for my hard drive. I did fdisk to
    > find out that my 55GB partition (hdb7) turned into a 31Kb partition.
    > Here is the output of fdisk:
    > Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    >
    > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > /dev/hdb1 * 1 1095 8795556 83 Linux
    > /dev/hdb2 1096 1146 409657+ 82 Linux swap /
    > Solaris
    > /dev/hdb3 1147 2648 12064815 5 Extended
    > /dev/hdb5 1648 2648 8040501 83 Linux

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > /dev/hdb6 1147 1647 4024219+ 83 Linux
    > /dev/hdb7 1648 1648 31 83 Linux

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >

    [...]
    >
    > I hope someone would suggest me a way to recover my data on this
    > partition.

    Looks like that /dev/hdb5 overlaps /dev/hdb7.
    But there seems to be lots of unused space behind cylinder 2648.
    If hdb7 occupied that space before a partition recovery tool like testdisk
    or gpart may help you to recover your old partition scheme.





  3. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?

    On Sun, 03 Dec 2006 10:11:22 -0800, nadircruise wrote this:

    > I tried to install Kubuntu 6.06 on my system, but the installer was unable
    > to read the partition table for my hard drive. I did fdisk to find out
    > that my 55GB partition (hdb7) turned into a 31Kb partition. Here is the
    > output of fdisk:
    > Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track,
    > 9733 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    >
    > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

    /dev/hdb1 * 1 1095 8795556 83 Linux
    /dev/hdb2 1096 1146 409657+ 82 Linux swap /Solaris
    /dev/hdb3 1147 2648 12815064 5 Extended

    /dev/hdb6 1147 1647 4024219+ 83 Linux
    /dev/hdb7 1648 1648 31 83 Linux
    /dev/hdb5 1648 2648 8040501 83 Linux
    >
    > Partition table entries are not in disk order
    >
    >
    > I also did the following:
    >
    > $ dmesg | tail
    > [ 9199.252441] EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. [
    > 9598.353573] EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. [
    > 9598.452241] kjournald starting. Commit interval 5 seconds [
    > 9601.294008] kjournald starting. Commit interval 5 seconds [
    > 9601.294984] EXT3 FS on hdb1, internal journal [ 9601.295205] EXT3-fs:
    > recovery complete. [ 9601.295397] EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with
    > ordered data mode. [ 9904.223672] SQUASHFS error: Can't find a SQUASHFS
    > superblock on hdb7 [ 9932.247583] VFS: Can't find ext3 filesystem on dev
    > hdb7. [ 9946.863511] VFS: Can't find an ext2 filesystem on dev hdb7.
    >
    > I hope someone would suggest me a way to recover my data on this
    > partition.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > --Nadir


    I think it's too late for /dev/hb7 the partition is set.
    Mounting a boot CD for the existing Linux system, booting to
    linux rescue mode, then mounting /dev/hdb7 as an ext2 filesystem, ie,
    mount -t ext2 would have allowed you to take a look at what you have. But
    Dmesg says it can't find a Ext2 fs either.

    Is this a complete fdisk report? The /dev/hdb5 that looks like
    the remainder of a 12G extended partition. IMO, you still have
    55G around just not part of /dev/hdb3, because totals don't add up to 80Gb.

    I think /dev/hdb7 is left over from something but you haven't allocated
    the remaining 55G as part of the extended partition.

    /dev/hdb7 should've started af 2649 not 1648. For your 80Gb
    /dev/hdb7 should look something like start 2649 / end 9733 or better
    /dev/hbb3 start 1143 / end 9733 67815604 5 Extended.

    Maybe you should try the Gparted LiveCD, for a non-destructive resize
    of the Hd. Or MbtTool to change the partition attributes and size or at
    least take a better look at what's been done.






  4. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?

    On Sun, 03 Dec 2006 10:11:22 -0800, nadircruise wrote:

    > I tried to install Kubuntu 6.06 on my system, but the installer was
    > unable to read the partition table for my hard drive. I did fdisk to
    > find out that my 55GB partition (hdb7) turned into a 31Kb partition.
    > Here is the output of fdisk:
    > Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    >
    >


    I had a similar problem and was able to sort it out. I don't recall the
    name of the utility I used, but I was thinking it was something like
    'testdisk' - pretty sketchy, I know, but hope that helps. I've also had
    good experience with the gparted Live CD.


  5. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?

    > Is this a complete fdisk report? The /dev/hdb5 that looks like
    > the remainder of a 12G extended partition. IMO, you still have
    > 55G around just not part of /dev/hdb3, because totals don't add up to 80Gb.


    Yes i think this is the complete fdisk report. Actually hdb7 was
    supposed to be a part of the extended partition. it was something like
    :
    hdb1 was 8GB, hdb2 was .5GB (swap), and there was an extended partition
    which contained hdb5 and hdb6 which were 12 GB (4+8), and the rest was
    given to hdb7. Now since fdisk doesn't show any free space, and hdb7
    partition only has 31Kb, that made me feel that somehow the partition
    table is corrupted. Anyway thanks for helping!


    > I think /dev/hdb7 is left over from something but you haven't allocated
    > the remaining 55G as part of the extended partition.
    >
    > /dev/hdb7 should've started af 2649 not 1648. For your 80Gb
    > /dev/hdb7 should look something like start 2649 / end 9733 or better
    > /dev/hbb3 start 1143 / end 9733 67815604 5 Extended.
    >
    > Maybe you should try the Gparted LiveCD, for a non-destructive resize
    > of the Hd. Or MbtTool to change the partition attributes and size or at
    > least take a better look at what's been done.


    Will try gparted, and let you know if it gets fixed!
    Thanks once again!
    --Nadir


  6. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?

    On Sun, 03 Dec 2006 10:11:22 -0800, nadircruise wrote:

    > I tried to install Kubuntu 6.06 on my system, but the installer was
    > unable to read the partition table for my hard drive. I did fdisk to
    > find out that my 55GB partition (hdb7) turned into a 31Kb partition.
    > Here is the output of fdisk:
    > Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    >
    > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > /dev/hdb1 * 1 1095 8795556 83 Linux
    > /dev/hdb2 1096 1146 409657+ 82 Linux swap /
    > Solaris
    > /dev/hdb3 1147 2648 12064815 5 Extended
    > /dev/hdb5 1648 2648 8040501 83 Linux
    > /dev/hdb6 1147 1647 4024219+ 83 Linux
    > /dev/hdb7 1648 1648 31 83 Linux
    >
    > Partition table entries are not in disk order
    >
    > [snip]


    Your main problem is that hdb7 has no place to reside, since hdb5 and hdb6
    totally occupy the Extended Partition hdb3. (There can be only one
    extended partition per drive.) Look at the starting and ending cylinders:
    hdb3 starts at 1147 and ends at 2648; hdb6 goes from 1147 to 1647; and
    hdb5 from 1648 to 2648. That's it. No more space. The hard drive has a
    total of 9733 cylinders. Did you intend to end hdb3 where you ended it?
    Most of the time when one uses an extended partition, its end is set at
    the end of the hard drive. You didn't do this.

    My suggestion is to try this, first: As root, use fdisk and delete hdb7;
    then recreate it as a Primary Partition hdb4 starting at cylinder 2649 and
    ending at 9733, the end of the drive. Save the changes. Do NOT format
    it!!! Now see if it can be read. If it can, recover your data by whatever
    means that works. If it doesn't, get back to us here with what happened
    (or didn't happen), and we'll take the next step towards a solution.

    You could also change the ending point of hdb3 from 2648 to 9733, then you
    could leave hdb7 as a Logical partition and set its start and end as
    above, but this involves more steps and could corrupt partitions 5 and 6.

    You might also consider changing the partition ID of hdb3 from 5,
    Extended, to 85, Linux Extended.

    Stef

  7. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?


    Stefan Patric wrote:
    > On Sun, 03 Dec 2006 10:11:22 -0800, nadircruise wrote:
    >
    > > I tried to install Kubuntu 6.06 on my system, but the installer was
    > > unable to read the partition table for my hard drive. I did fdisk to
    > > find out that my 55GB partition (hdb7) turned into a 31Kb partition.
    > > Here is the output of fdisk:
    > > Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    > > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    > > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    > >
    > > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > > /dev/hdb1 * 1 1095 8795556 83 Linux
    > > /dev/hdb2 1096 1146 409657+ 82 Linux swap /
    > > Solaris
    > > /dev/hdb3 1147 2648 12064815 5 Extended
    > > /dev/hdb5 1648 2648 8040501 83 Linux
    > > /dev/hdb6 1147 1647 4024219+ 83 Linux
    > > /dev/hdb7 1648 1648 31 83 Linux
    > >
    > > Partition table entries are not in disk order
    > >
    > > [snip]

    >
    > Your main problem is that hdb7 has no place to reside, since hdb5 and hdb6
    > totally occupy the Extended Partition hdb3. (There can be only one
    > extended partition per drive.) Look at the starting and ending cylinders:
    > hdb3 starts at 1147 and ends at 2648; hdb6 goes from 1147 to 1647; and
    > hdb5 from 1648 to 2648. That's it. No more space. The hard drive has a
    > total of 9733 cylinders. Did you intend to end hdb3 where you ended it?
    > Most of the time when one uses an extended partition, its end is set at
    > the end of the hard drive. You didn't do this.
    >
    > My suggestion is to try this, first: As root, use fdisk and delete hdb7;
    > then recreate it as a Primary Partition hdb4 starting at cylinder 2649 and
    > ending at 9733, the end of the drive. Save the changes. Do NOT format
    > it!!! Now see if it can be read. If it can, recover your data by whatever
    > means that works. If it doesn't, get back to us here with what happened
    > (or didn't happen), and we'll take the next step towards a solution.
    >
    > You could also change the ending point of hdb3 from 2648 to 9733, then you
    > could leave hdb7 as a Logical partition and set its start and end as
    > above, but this involves more steps and could corrupt partitions 5 and 6.
    >
    > You might also consider changing the partition ID of hdb3 from 5,
    > Extended, to 85, Linux Extended.
    >
    > Stef



    I have no data on hdb5 or hdb6. Now my primary concern is to save my
    data on hdb1 (which seems pretty safe), and on hdb7, rest i don't care
    about anything. I just want to create a partition table which would
    save my data and make Kubuntu run smoothly. BTW, since i am using
    Kubuntu Live CD right now, i realise that using fdisk would be a better
    option.


  8. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?


    Stefan Patric wrote:
    > On Sun, 03 Dec 2006 10:11:22 -0800, nadircruise wrote:
    >
    > > I tried to install Kubuntu 6.06 on my system, but the installer was
    > > unable to read the partition table for my hard drive. I did fdisk to
    > > find out that my 55GB partition (hdb7) turned into a 31Kb partition.
    > > Here is the output of fdisk:
    > > Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    > > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    > > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    > >
    > > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > > /dev/hdb1 * 1 1095 8795556 83 Linux
    > > /dev/hdb2 1096 1146 409657+ 82 Linux swap /
    > > Solaris
    > > /dev/hdb3 1147 2648 12064815 5 Extended
    > > /dev/hdb5 1648 2648 8040501 83 Linux
    > > /dev/hdb6 1147 1647 4024219+ 83 Linux
    > > /dev/hdb7 1648 1648 31 83 Linux
    > >
    > > Partition table entries are not in disk order
    > >
    > > [snip]

    >
    > Your main problem is that hdb7 has no place to reside, since hdb5 and hdb6
    > totally occupy the Extended Partition hdb3. (There can be only one
    > extended partition per drive.) Look at the starting and ending cylinders:
    > hdb3 starts at 1147 and ends at 2648; hdb6 goes from 1147 to 1647; and
    > hdb5 from 1648 to 2648. That's it. No more space. The hard drive has a
    > total of 9733 cylinders. Did you intend to end hdb3 where you ended it?
    > Most of the time when one uses an extended partition, its end is set at
    > the end of the hard drive. You didn't do this.
    >
    > My suggestion is to try this, first: As root, use fdisk and delete hdb7;
    > then recreate it as a Primary Partition hdb4 starting at cylinder 2649 and
    > ending at 9733, the end of the drive. Save the changes. Do NOT format
    > it!!! Now see if it can be read. If it can, recover your data by whatever
    > means that works. If it doesn't, get back to us here with what happened
    > (or didn't happen), and we'll take the next step towards a solution.
    >
    > You could also change the ending point of hdb3 from 2648 to 9733, then you
    > could leave hdb7 as a Logical partition and set its start and end as
    > above, but this involves more steps and could corrupt partitions 5 and 6.
    >
    > You might also consider changing the partition ID of hdb3 from 5,
    > Extended, to 85, Linux Extended.
    >
    > Stef



    I have no data on hdb5 or hdb6. Now my primary concern is to save my
    data on hdb1 (which seems pretty safe), and on hdb7, rest i don't care
    about anything. I just want to create a partition table which would
    save my data and make Kubuntu run smoothly. BTW, since i am using
    Kubuntu Live CD right now, i realise that using fdisk would be a better
    option.

    -- Nadir


  9. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?

    After deleting hdb7 using fdisk, i created hdb4 as Stefan said. After
    mounting it as ext3, i am still not able to find my data. Here's the
    fdisk output:

    Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/hdb1 * 1 1095 8795556 83 Linux
    /dev/hdb2 1096 1146 409657+ 82 Linux swap /
    Solaris
    /dev/hdb3 1147 2648 12064815 5 Extended
    /dev/hdb4 2649 9733 56910262+ 83 Linux
    /dev/hdb5 1648 2648 8040501 83 Linux
    /dev/hdb6 1147 1647 4024219+ 83 Linux

    Partition table entries are not in disk order


    $ dmesg | tail
    [ 284.612741] EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
    [ 293.859941] hdb: dma_intr: status=0x51 { DriveReady SeekComplete
    Error }
    [ 293.859964] hdb: dma_intr: error=0x84 { DriveStatusError BadCRC }
    [ 293.859977] ide: failed opcode was: unknown
    [ 335.008720] hdb: dma_intr: status=0x51 { DriveReady SeekComplete
    Error }
    [ 335.008744] hdb: dma_intr: error=0x84 { DriveStatusError BadCRC }
    [ 335.008757] ide: failed opcode was: unknown
    [ 335.033646] hdb: dma_intr: status=0x51 { DriveReady SeekComplete
    Error }
    [ 335.033672] hdb: dma_intr: error=0x84 { DriveStatusError BadCRC }
    [ 335.033685] ide: failed opcode was: unknown


  10. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?

    nadircruise@gmail.com wrote:
    > [ 284.612741] EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
    > [ 293.859941] hdb: dma_intr: status=0x51 { DriveReady SeekComplete
    > Error }
    > [ 293.859964] hdb: dma_intr: error=0x84 { DriveStatusError BadCRC }


    Any time you start seeing BadCRC errors you need to check the SMART
    status of the drive and/or use 'badblocks'. There's a good chance
    you're seeing hardware failure here.

  11. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?


    John-Paul Stewart wrote:
    > nadircruise@gmail.com wrote:
    > > [ 284.612741] EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
    > > [ 293.859941] hdb: dma_intr: status=0x51 { DriveReady SeekComplete
    > > Error }
    > > [ 293.859964] hdb: dma_intr: error=0x84 { DriveStatusError BadCRC }

    >
    > Any time you start seeing BadCRC errors you need to check the SMART
    > status of the drive and/or use 'badblocks'. There's a good chance
    > you're seeing hardware failure here.


    Well though my data on hdb7 is gone, but atleast i now have ubuntu up
    and running with the data on hda1 and hdb1 safe. It seems that there
    was some problem with / being mounted on ext3, i tried to install the
    system on ext2 and it somehow worked. So now my problem is solved. I
    once again thank all of you for supporting me!

    --Nadir


  12. Re: Corrupted Partition Table?

    On Sun, 03 Dec 2006 23:42:21 -0800, nadircruise wrote:

    > After deleting hdb7 using fdisk, i created hdb4 as Stefan said. After
    > mounting it as ext3, i am still not able to find my data. Here's the
    > fdisk output:
    >
    > Disk /dev/hdb: 80.0 GB, 80060424192 bytes
    > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9733 cylinders
    > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    >
    > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > /dev/hdb1 * 1 1095 8795556 83 Linux
    > /dev/hdb2 1096 1146 409657+ 82 Linux swap /
    > Solaris
    > /dev/hdb3 1147 2648 12064815 5 Extended
    > /dev/hdb4 2649 9733 56910262+ 83 Linux
    > /dev/hdb5 1648 2648 8040501 83 Linux
    > /dev/hdb6 1147 1647 4024219+ 83 Linux
    >
    > Partition table entries are not in disk order
    >
    > [snip dmesg output]


    Change hdb4 to filesystem ext2. You don't need a journal right now, and
    you can always create one later. Now run without mounting hdb4, run fsck
    on it. That may correct all or some of the errors you're seeing in dmesg.
    Once that's completed, mount the partition (as ext2) and see if you can
    read it. If you can't, get some Linux file recovery software and run it
    on the partition.

    FWIW, doing something like the above should be done on a COPY (generated
    by using dd) of the bad partition, but you probably don't have an extra
    55GB of hard drive space laying around. So, just go ahead with the above
    scenario.

    Stefan


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