Newbie needs help.. - Hardware

This is a discussion on Newbie needs help.. - Hardware ; I'm a programmer/analyst by trade, so I know a lot about computers, but I'll be the first to admit my basic lack of skills when it comes to configuring and installing new hardware. I just received a brand spanking new ...

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Thread: Newbie needs help..

  1. Newbie needs help..

    I'm a programmer/analyst by trade, so I know a lot about computers, but
    I'll be the first to admit my basic lack of skills when it comes to
    configuring and installing new hardware. I just received a brand
    spanking new 400 GB hard drive, and I want to get to know Linux.

    What I'd appreciate is some pointers to resources that tell me how to
    partition my new hardware, and what other steps I need to take to get
    up and running on Linux. I have a pretty bog standard Dell box, about 2
    years old, and I don't have any fancy peripherals like cameras, etc.; a
    Lexmark printer is about it. So I just need basic information at this
    time.

    Any help would be appreciated, and I'd also like to hear what distro
    you think is easiest for a newbie to install and learn (I did
    successfully install Caldera about five years ago, but that was on
    existing hardware, and I had purchased their manual and CD; this time I
    wanted to try it strictly off the net.) Thanks in advance for your help!


  2. Re: Newbie needs help..

    On 30 Nov 2006 12:07:39 -0800, KevinB wrote:

    Welcome to linux.
    I just poped in because of your poor subject. You may want to read
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    > I'm a programmer/analyst by trade, so I know a lot about computers, but
    > I'll be the first to admit my basic lack of skills when it comes to
    > configuring and installing new hardware. I just received a brand
    > spanking new 400 GB hard drive, and I want to get to know Linux.


    Download iso, verify iso checksum matches, burn iso
    http://sourceforge.net/project/showf...kage_id=173828
    boot iso, create some free space for your linux install.

    md5sum and sha1sum checksum programs
    ftp://ftp.gnupg.org/gcrypt/binary/sha1sum.exe
    http://etree.org/md5com.html
    http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1321.html


    Do same for any of the 300+ linux distribution you want to play with.
    http://distrowatch.com/ can provide some research material.


    During linux installs, I alwasy pick a custom install during the
    partitioning phase.
    I click the Empty free/unformated/unknown part of my disk and allocate
    about 6 to 10 gig for each linux root partition (/)

    That allows me to add on partitions when I need space, and allows for
    installation of new releases and other linux installations and still
    be able to boot current OS installes.

    Since you indicated programmer/analyst you might look here
    http://www.mandrake.tips.4.free.fr/install100.html
    For Mandriva Linux install screen shots.

    Here is another screen shot set showing the custom partition phase
    with other linux distribution screen shot links at bottom of
    page
    http://www.howtoforge.com/perfect_setup_mandriva_2007

  3. Re: Newbie needs help..

    > this time I wanted to try it strictly off the net.

    www.distrowatch.com

    I use debian, but if you're not a tech guy, it might not be the distro for
    you. Otherwise knoppix or gnoppix, redhat / fedora / centOS, mandriva,
    SuSE, ubuntu, gentoo and others seems popular. Knoppix is good in that it
    runs from a live CD and you don't have to partition your drive to use it.
    Although it doesn't seem to boot on my laptop. The reason I stopped using
    SuSE all those years ago.

    As far as the lexmark, they're not always so good with linux.

    printing: linuxprinting.org

    kernel: kernel.org

    sound: alsa-project.org

    usb: www.linux-usb.org

    .... and many other sites for individual hardware.

    software homepages/sources location search: freshmeat.net

    HTH,
    S7

  4. Re: Newbie needs help..

    On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 12:07:39 -0800, KevinB wrote:

    > I'm a programmer/analyst by trade, so I know a lot about computers, but
    > I'll be the first to admit my basic lack of skills when it comes to
    > configuring and installing new hardware. I just received a brand
    > spanking new 400 GB hard drive, and I want to get to know Linux.
    >
    > What I'd appreciate is some pointers to resources that tell me how to
    > partition my new hardware, and what other steps I need to take to get
    > up and running on Linux. I have a pretty bog standard Dell box, about 2
    > years old, and I don't have any fancy peripherals like cameras, etc.; a
    > Lexmark printer is about it. So I just need basic information at this
    > time.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated, and I'd also like to hear what distro
    > you think is easiest for a newbie to install and learn (I did
    > successfully install Caldera about five years ago, but that was on
    > existing hardware, and I had purchased their manual and CD; this time I
    > wanted to try it strictly off the net.) Thanks in advance for your help!


    FWIW - there isn't any 'best' or 'easiest' or whatever. There are over 350
    active Linux distributions - it's naive to think there is a 'best'
    solution on such meager criteria. I suggest you go to distrowatch.com and
    look around for a bit and see what appeals.

    Since you're new to Linux (or will be) I'd recommend you take the simplest
    partitioning approach for your first few installs - all you need is a swap
    partition and one for root (/). I suggest you allot about 10-20 gb per
    distro and reuse the same swap for all. Pick out several interesting
    distros and install them - it is quite simple to multiboot.


  5. Re: Newbie needs help..

    On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 12:07:39 -0800, KevinB wrote:

    > I'm a programmer/analyst by trade, so I know a lot about computers, but
    > I'll be the first to admit my basic lack of skills when it comes to
    > configuring and installing new hardware. I just received a brand
    > spanking new 400 GB hard drive, and I want to get to know Linux.
    >
    > What I'd appreciate is some pointers to resources that tell me how to
    > partition my new hardware, and what other steps I need to take to get
    > up and running on Linux. I have a pretty bog standard Dell box, about 2
    > years old, and I don't have any fancy peripherals like cameras, etc.; a
    > Lexmark printer is about it. So I just need basic information at this
    > time.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated, and I'd also like to hear what distro
    > you think is easiest for a newbie to install and learn (I did
    > successfully install Caldera about five years ago, but that was on
    > existing hardware, and I had purchased their manual and CD; this time I
    > wanted to try it strictly off the net.) Thanks in advance for your help!


    I suggest that first you buy this book: RUNNING LINUX; I think it's up to
    the 5th edition. IMHO, it's the best newbie introductory reference book
    to Linux.

    Also, check out The Linux Documentation Project: www.tldp.org; lots of
    HOWTOs and online books for free.

    As to partitioning, keep it simple: swap and / (root) or swap, /, /home.

    Stef


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