OpenSuSE for older computer? - Hardware

This is a discussion on OpenSuSE for older computer? - Hardware ; Hardware: 466MHz Celeron CPU 384MB RAM 20GB HDD 40GB HDD NVIDIA GeForce4 video card Creative SBPCI sound card D-Link DFE-530TX+ PCI NIC Intel 82371AB/EB PCI USB Universal Host Controller HP Deskjet 5550 I have not used Linux and wish to ...

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Thread: OpenSuSE for older computer?

  1. OpenSuSE for older computer?

    Hardware:
    466MHz Celeron CPU
    384MB RAM
    20GB HDD
    40GB HDD
    NVIDIA GeForce4 video card
    Creative SBPCI sound card
    D-Link DFE-530TX+ PCI NIC
    Intel 82371AB/EB PCI USB Universal Host Controller
    HP Deskjet 5550

    I have not used Linux and wish to set this computer up as a dual-boot
    Linux/Win98SE. I need a stable OS that can handle my basic computing
    needs: OpenOffice, internet access via a small home network, listening
    to CDs while I work, occasional burning of data CDs, and printing via
    a USB port. I also need to access my Windows created data. A Live CD
    distro is preferred but not required.

    The Linux Distribution Chooser at www.zegeniestudios.net suggested
    OpenSuSE. Are there others I should consider?

    TIA,
    Harry

  2. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 16:56:08 -0500, HarryB wrote:

    > Hardware:
    > 466MHz Celeron CPU
    > 384MB RAM
    > 20GB HDD
    > 40GB HDD
    > NVIDIA GeForce4 video card
    > Creative SBPCI sound card
    > D-Link DFE-530TX+ PCI NIC
    > Intel 82371AB/EB PCI USB Universal Host Controller HP Deskjet 5550
    >
    > I have not used Linux and wish to set this computer up as a dual-boot
    > Linux/Win98SE. I need a stable OS that can handle my basic computing
    > needs: OpenOffice, internet access via a small home network, listening
    > to CDs while I work, occasional burning of data CDs, and printing via a
    > USB port. I also need to access my Windows created data. A Live CD
    > distro is preferred but not required.
    >
    > The Linux Distribution Chooser at www.zegeniestudios.net suggested
    > OpenSuSE. Are there others I should consider?
    >
    > TIA,
    > Harry


    Yes. Elive would work a lot better with your somewhat antiquated hardware.
    Debian, Damn Small, Puppy and Vector would also be better. At any rate,
    you won't want to run KDE or Gnome desktops - or at least be prepared for
    lethargic performance if you do. I'd recommend XFCE or Enlightenment or
    one of the other 'lighter' desktops instead.

  3. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 16:56:08 -0500, HarryB wrote:

    > Hardware:
    > 466MHz Celeron CPU
    > 384MB RAM
    > 20GB HDD
    > 40GB HDD
    > NVIDIA GeForce4 video card
    > Creative SBPCI sound card
    > D-Link DFE-530TX+ PCI NIC
    > Intel 82371AB/EB PCI USB Universal Host Controller HP Deskjet 5550
    >
    > I have not used Linux and wish to set this computer up as a dual-boot
    > Linux/Win98SE. I need a stable OS that can handle my basic computing
    > needs: OpenOffice, internet access via a small home network, listening
    > to CDs while I work, occasional burning of data CDs, and printing via a
    > USB port. I also need to access my Windows created data. A Live CD
    > distro is preferred but not required.
    >
    > The Linux Distribution Chooser at www.zegeniestudios.net suggested
    > OpenSuSE. Are there others I should consider?
    >
    > TIA,
    > Harry


    Although OpenSuse and Suse, in general, are good distros, which can also
    be said of most major Linux distributions, for your older system, it may
    be a little too demanding on the hardware. I would suggest a distro like
    XUbuntu with the "lightweight" graphic interface XFCE instead of the
    "heavier" KDE or GNOME desktops that are normally installed by default.

    With most any Linux distros, you can pick which graphic interface you
    want to install (by using the "custom" option), but XUbuntu comes
    optimized for XFCE by default. So, it makes installation for someone who
    has never installed or worked with Linux before simple: just point and
    click. Plus, Ubuntu is a popular, user-friendly distro.

    FWIW, I did a custom install of Debian with XFCE on an IBM Thinkpad 240X
    (500mHz PIII, 192MB RAM, 12GB hard drive) dual booting with Windows 2000
    Pro, and Linux runs just fine.

    Stef

  4. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On 17 Oct 2008 22:43:26 GMT, ray wrote:

    >On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 16:56:08 -0500, HarryB wrote:
    >

    [snip]
    >>
    >> The Linux Distribution Chooser at www.zegeniestudios.net suggested
    >> OpenSuSE. Are there others I should consider?
    >>
    >> TIA,
    >> Harry

    >
    >Yes. Elive would work a lot better with your somewhat antiquated hardware.
    >Debian, Damn Small, Puppy and Vector would also be better. At any rate,
    >you won't want to run KDE or Gnome desktops - or at least be prepared for
    >lethargic performance if you do. I'd recommend XFCE or Enlightenment or
    >one of the other 'lighter' desktops instead.


    I didn't know there were so many flavors of Linux! At this point I've
    ruled out Elive because I see no reason to pay for a distro when I can
    try others for free. DSL won't work because the refresh rate is too
    low for my monitor, and Puppy doesn't appeal to me because as an avid
    bicyclist I know that cute little puppies can grow up into big mean
    dogs that sometimes hurt cyclists ;-) .

    For starters I'm going to try XUbuntu, Vector, and possibly Debian.
    I'm not in a hurry and intend to take my time to learn Linux so that I
    can eventually switch my other computers over to a non-Windows OS.

    Thank you for the advice.
    Harry

  5. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 23:31:57 GMT, Stefan Patric
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 16:56:08 -0500, HarryB wrote:
    >

    [snip]
    >>
    >> The Linux Distribution Chooser at www.zegeniestudios.net suggested
    >> OpenSuSE. Are there others I should consider?
    >>
    >> TIA,
    >> Harry

    >
    >Although OpenSuse and Suse, in general, are good distros, which can also
    >be said of most major Linux distributions, for your older system, it may
    >be a little too demanding on the hardware. I would suggest a distro like
    >XUbuntu with the "lightweight" graphic interface XFCE instead of the
    >"heavier" KDE or GNOME desktops that are normally installed by default.
    >
    >With most any Linux distros, you can pick which graphic interface you
    >want to install (by using the "custom" option), but XUbuntu comes
    >optimized for XFCE by default. So, it makes installation for someone who
    >has never installed or worked with Linux before simple: just point and
    >click. Plus, Ubuntu is a popular, user-friendly distro.
    >
    >FWIW, I did a custom install of Debian with XFCE on an IBM Thinkpad 240X
    >(500mHz PIII, 192MB RAM, 12GB hard drive) dual booting with Windows 2000
    >Pro, and Linux runs just fine.
    >
    >Stef


    Since I have never used Linux, I didn't know anything about the
    different types of desktops. I don't understand how or why one GUI
    would use more resources than another, but a little research convinced
    me that there can be big differences. So, your suggestion to look for
    a light GUI was very helpful.

    As I note in my other response, I am going to try XUbuntu, Vector, and
    maybe Debian. I know that it is possible to set up the computer to
    dual boot Windows and Linux, and seem to remember reading somewhere
    that it is possible to have multiple Linux distros using something
    like XOSL as the bootloader, but maybe I'm trying to walk before I've
    learned to crawl.

    Thank you for helping out this newbie.
    Harry

  6. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    HarryB wrote:

    > Puppy doesn't appeal to me because as an avid
    > bicyclist I know that cute little puppies can grow up into big mean
    > dogs that sometimes hurt cyclists ;-) .


    Puppy Linux is actually very good. I use classic Pentium 120s here and
    have had a working desktops on these machines, even though they have
    only conventional 640x480 VGA graphics cards.

    I use Debian for more general use across the network (again on
    Intel Pentium 120 machines.)

    > For starters I'm going to try XUbuntu, Vector, and possibly Debian.


    Ok.

    > I'm not in a hurry and intend to take my time to learn Linux so that I
    > can eventually switch my other computers over to a non-Windows OS.


    Thats the way I would go. Get one machine working as you want it, before
    converting the others. When you encounter a problem, stick with it and
    try and find a working solution. Use google, reference documentation and
    ask on usenet. Keep your other machines intact until you are confident
    enough to make the migration. Ensure that you have one machine that can
    access the internet, and make changes to one machine, and test before
    rolling out changes network wide.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    Linux User: #370818 http://markhobley.yi.org/


  7. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:09:27 -0500, HarryB wrote:

    > On 17 Oct 2008 22:43:26 GMT, ray wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 16:56:08 -0500, HarryB wrote:
    >>

    > [snip]
    >>>
    >>> The Linux Distribution Chooser at www.zegeniestudios.net suggested
    >>> OpenSuSE. Are there others I should consider?
    >>>
    >>> TIA,
    >>> Harry

    >>
    >>Yes. Elive would work a lot better with your somewhat antiquated
    >>hardware. Debian, Damn Small, Puppy and Vector would also be better. At
    >>any rate, you won't want to run KDE or Gnome desktops - or at least be
    >>prepared for lethargic performance if you do. I'd recommend XFCE or
    >>Enlightenment or one of the other 'lighter' desktops instead.

    >
    > I didn't know there were so many flavors of Linux! At this point I've
    > ruled out Elive because I see no reason to pay for a distro when I can
    > try others for free. DSL won't work because the refresh rate is too low
    > for my monitor, and Puppy doesn't appeal to me because as an avid
    > bicyclist I know that cute little puppies can grow up into big mean dogs
    > that sometimes hurt cyclists ;-) .


    I don't know how many "flavors" of Linux there are, but according to
    distrowatch.com there are about 330 active Linux distributions.

    So if you don't want to pay for Elive, then don't it is possible to
    download it without paying.

    >
    > For starters I'm going to try XUbuntu, Vector, and possibly Debian. I'm
    > not in a hurry and intend to take my time to learn Linux so that I can
    > eventually switch my other computers over to a non-Windows OS.
    >
    > Thank you for the advice.
    > Harry


    You might browse around distrowatch.com and learn about some more as well.
    FWIW - a year or so ago I installed Elive (from free download) on a P166
    with 64mb of RAM. It was no screaming eagle, but it was certainly usable.

  8. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:12:41 -0500, HarryB wrote:

    > On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 23:31:57 GMT, Stefan Patric
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 16:56:08 -0500, HarryB wrote:
    >>

    > [snip]
    >>>
    >>> The Linux Distribution Chooser at www.zegeniestudios.net suggested
    >>> OpenSuSE. Are there others I should consider?
    >>>
    >>> TIA,
    >>> Harry

    >>
    >>Although OpenSuse and Suse, in general, are good distros, which can also
    >>be said of most major Linux distributions, for your older system, it may
    >>be a little too demanding on the hardware. I would suggest a distro
    >>like XUbuntu with the "lightweight" graphic interface XFCE instead of
    >>the "heavier" KDE or GNOME desktops that are normally installed by
    >>default.
    >>
    >>With most any Linux distros, you can pick which graphic interface you
    >>want to install (by using the "custom" option), but XUbuntu comes
    >>optimized for XFCE by default. So, it makes installation for someone
    >>who has never installed or worked with Linux before simple: just point
    >>and click. Plus, Ubuntu is a popular, user-friendly distro.
    >>
    >>FWIW, I did a custom install of Debian with XFCE on an IBM Thinkpad 240X
    >>(500mHz PIII, 192MB RAM, 12GB hard drive) dual booting with Windows 2000
    >>Pro, and Linux runs just fine.
    >>
    >>Stef

    >
    > Since I have never used Linux, I didn't know anything about the
    > different types of desktops. I don't understand how or why one GUI would
    > use more resources than another, but a little research convinced me that
    > there can be big differences. So, your suggestion to look for a light
    > GUI was very helpful.


    It has a lot to do with 'eye candy'. Is a heavier desktop any more useful?
    Not in my mind - it just might look a little more appealing.

    >
    > As I note in my other response, I am going to try XUbuntu, Vector, and
    > maybe Debian. I know that it is possible to set up the computer to dual
    > boot Windows and Linux, and seem to remember reading somewhere that it
    > is possible to have multiple Linux distros using something like XOSL as
    > the bootloader, but maybe I'm trying to walk before I've learned to
    > crawl.
    >
    > Thank you for helping out this newbie. Harry


    It is certainly possible (easy, even) to set up a dual boot. With a little
    more computer, you could also install as a virtual machine inside what you
    already have - it's much more convenient that way.


  9. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:12:41 -0500, HarryB wrote:

    > Since I have never used Linux, I didn't know anything about the different
    > types of desktops. I don't understand how or why one GUI would use more
    > resources than another, but a little research convinced me that there can
    > be big differences. So, your suggestion to look for a light GUI was very
    > helpful.


    so the first thing youare going to want to find is a installation that
    allows you to choose which GUI(windows manager) you want and offers you a
    choice. That choice may consist of rejecting all guis on install, then
    usue an internet updater (apt-get on debian, rpm on redhat, ??? uses yum)
    that allows you to go get the very light weight windows manager you want.

    I currently rn iec icewm on Debian sarge and etch on PII with 256Mb of ram
    with thunderbird for mail, firefox for browser and pan for usenet.

    However, my P120, with only 64MB of ran still runs twm and is very, very
    slow, I suspect that low ram is the real issue, but as that isn't a
    desktop boxen any more, the WM rarely gets used (oh, it still works sort
    of test).

    the enlightenment WM was around at the time that this boxen was setup and
    it was just too bloaty, even then. No experience with XFCE.

    The other problem will be that having loaded your windows manager, you may
    find that applications like firefox are not usable as they themselves are
    just too much bloatware, or that you can only use one at a time.

    You should be able to install multiple linux installations with lilo,
    grub, etc. The only gotcha might be you hardware seeing the boot
    partitions, e.g. you might have to set up a small /boot (10Mb?) for each
    of the distros as the first fewpartitions. This relats to older hardware
    not being able to see the full, modern hard disks, so you fudged the
    bios HD figures to make it look like one that it could handle and within
    that 'size' you installed the linux loaders that could then use the
    full hard disk.

    Good luck. you will get to try a lot of the linux windows managers.




  10. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:09:27 -0500, HarryB wrote:

    > DSL won't work because the refresh rate is too low for my
    > monitor,

    what monitor?
    what error?
    Refresh rates are an X server setting qand highly modifiable, or they
    were.


  11. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2008 08:46:32 +1000, terryc
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:12:41 -0500, HarryB wrote:
    >
    >> Since I have never used Linux, I didn't know anything about the different
    >> types of desktops. I don't understand how or why one GUI would use more
    >> resources than another, but a little research convinced me that there can
    >> be big differences. So, your suggestion to look for a light GUI was very
    >> helpful.

    >
    >so the first thing youare going to want to find is a installation that
    >allows you to choose which GUI(windows manager) you want and offers you a
    >choice. That choice may consist of rejecting all guis on install, then
    >usue an internet updater (apt-get on debian, rpm on redhat, ??? uses yum)
    >that allows you to go get the very light weight windows manager you want.
    >

    [snip]

    It seems to me that if I find a distro (I assume that is the same as
    "installation") that will allow me to reject all GUIs upon
    installation, I would first have to learn to use the command line
    before being able to install my choice of windows managers. I'm not
    above learning Linux's basic commands (I had to learn many DOS
    commands when I "upgraded" from my Commodore128 to Windows 3.1), but
    I'll have to think through that option before trying it.

    I'll just have to tinker with my system to see what will work best for
    my 466MHz/386MB RAM system. I'm presently running Windows 98SE and the
    only complaint I have vis-a-vis speed is that some complex web pages
    run slowly. All other apps run at an acceptable speed.

    Harry

  12. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2008 08:49:28 +1000, terryc
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:09:27 -0500, HarryB wrote:
    >
    >> DSL won't work because the refresh rate is too low for my
    >> monitor,

    >what monitor?
    >what error?
    >Refresh rates are an X server setting qand highly modifiable, or they
    >were.


    My monitor is a Dell E773 CRT. I don't know what the present refresh
    rate is because the setting is "Optimal". However, when I force it to
    60Hz, which according to the following link is DSL's fixed setting,
    the flicker is very annoying.

    https://damnsmalllinux.org/wiki/inde...sked_Questions

    It appears that there may be a way to fix this problem, but as a total
    newbie to Linux, I don't fancy sitting in front of a flickering
    monitor trying to fix the flicker so I can learn how to use Linux.

    Harry

  13. Re: OpenSuSE for older computer?

    HarryB wrote:

    > It seems to me that if I find a distro (I assume that is the same as
    > "installation") that will allow me to reject all GUIs upon
    > installation, I would first have to learn to use the command line
    > before being able to install my choice of windows managers. I'm not
    > above learning Linux's basic commands


    In Debian things are very easy. It has a non-graphical installation,
    and has a non-graphical package manager available.

    Logged in as root from the command prompt, type:

    aptitude

    You can now select the X windowing system, appropriate window manager
    and any other packages that you require.

    > I'll just have to tinker with my system to see what will work best for
    > my 466MHz/386MB RAM system. I'm presently running Windows 98SE and the
    > only complaint I have vis-a-vis speed is that some complex web pages
    > run slowly.


    Microsoft Windows '98 is very very slow. In my experience it runs about
    three times slower than Microsoft Windows '95. I had a 450MHz Cyrix 686 that I
    was told to upgrade to Microsoft Windows '98 by one of their engineers. I was
    never happy with this and I eventually downgraded back to Microsoft Windows
    '95, having purchased additional machines so that I could run different
    application types.

    Now of course, I am using Linux on the machine, and it runs very quickly
    (way quicker than it ever did with Microsoft Windows), and it never
    crashes. (It would blue screen every 20 minutes running Microsoft
    Windows '95 and every four days using Microsoft Windows '98). I can now
    run all of my applications on one machine. (Using Microsoft Windows, I
    needed one machine for browser, mail client and document editor, a
    second machine for running the webserver, and a third machine to handle
    media files, otherwise the computer would just crash.)

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    Linux User: #370818 http://markhobley.yi.org/


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